How to find and adopt a healthy and happy shelter dog

How to find and adopt a healthy and happy shelter dog

Are you getting a new dog or thinking about it? We’re so excited for you and we know you’ll give your new companion a great, loving home.

Once you’ve decided you’re ready for a dog, the next big decision is where to find this lifelong family member. You’ll want to make sure to NOT get an animal from a puppy mill and that’s not always easy to recognize. Our Animal Rescue and Response team often deploys to rescue abused dogs from puppy mill operations in cooperation with local law enforcement.

Sadly, some places that seem like great puppy sources may not be, but if you follow our top puppy-buying tips, you’ll be far more likely to secure a healthy, well-socialized dog who doesn’t drain your emotions or your wallet.

Sign up to receive our exclusive e-book full of training techniques, problem-solving and important information about caring for your pet.

How to find and adopt a healthy and happy shelter dog

Consider adoption first

Adopting a dog who needs a home is one of the best things you’ll ever do. Your local animal shelter or rescue organization can help you find the right match for your family. There are also breed-specific rescue groups for every breed of dog, including “designer” or “hybrids” like labradoodles and puggles. The Shelter Pet Project can help you find a great dog or puppy in your area!

Find a responsible breeder and visit the premises

Responsible breeders provide a loving and healthy environment for their canine companions, one that they will be proud to show you. You should never buy a puppy without seeing where the dog and their parents were raised and housed with your own eyes, no matter what papers the breeder has. Beware: AKC and other types of registration papers only tell you who a puppy’s parents were, not how they were treated.

Don’t get a puppy from a pet store

Despite what they may tell you, most pet stores do sell puppy mill puppies. Unless the store is “puppy-friendly” by sourcing homeless pups from local animal shelters, you have to be very careful about a pet store’s link to puppy mills.

Don’t believe promises that puppies are “home-raised” or “family-raised”

Many puppy millers pose as small family breeders online and in newspaper and magazine ads. We have often helped local authorities in the rescue of puppy mill dogs. In almost all cases, the puppy mills sold puppies via the internet using legitimate-looking ads or websites that made it look like the dogs came from somewhere happy and beautiful—claims that couldn’t have been further from the truth.

Avoid the temptation to “rescue” a puppy mill dog by buying them

Unfortunately, that just opens up space for another puppy mill puppy and puts money into the pockets of the puppy mill industry. The money you spend goes right back to the puppy mill operator, ensuring they will continue breeding and treating dogs inhumanely. If you see someone keeping puppies in poor conditions, alert your local animal control authorities instead of buying the animal.

Do your part: Pledge to help stop puppy mills!

Choose not to buy your next pet from a pet store or internet site, and refuse to buy supplies from any pet store or internet site that sells puppies.

You can stop this cycle of cruelty by adopting your next pet. You can also donate to help shut down puppy mills and continue our lifesaving work for all animals.

How to find and adopt a healthy and happy shelter dog

Congratulations! You have decided to adopt a dog or puppy. Now you have some other decisions to make. What size dog is best? Will a dog fit your lifestyle?

Perhaps you are not sure if you want to adopt a dog or not. Or, maybe someone in your family wants a dog but others do not think a dog is a good idea. How will you decide what to do?

These questions and many more are answered in our Course on Dog Adoption.

There are lots of reasons for wanting a dog:

You just lost a dog who you considered your best friend and feel frantic to get another dog.

Your friend just got a great dog.

A family member is lobbying for a dog.

You fondly remember a dog you had in earlier years and think that is what you need or what your children need.

Whatever your reasons for wanting a dog, you need to evaluate carefully whether you are prepared to raise a dog and what type of dog fits your current lifestyle or family.

Dog Lovers Training Course

How to find and adopt a healthy and happy shelter dog

If your Dog has become too noisy or disobedient or aggressive, our Dog Lovers Training Course will teach you how to obedience train it and stop it from barking and biting.

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Are You a First-time Dog Owner?

Dog ownership lasts for the whole life of the dog – for many dogs, that is 12 to 15 years. Getting a dog is a lot like having a baby – there is much to do to prepare.

There is a baby stage which is very labor-intensive on your part, there is a toddler stage and an adolescent stage which can both be a bit trying on your patience, then comes the long and happy relationship (if you got through the earlier stages successfully), and then there is a “senior” stage during which your dog may be on medications or need your help. The commitment is long but should be rewarding.

There is nothing like the devotion of a great dog. Be sure you deserve that devotion and unconditional love.

Which Dog to Adopt?

There are lots of dogs from which to choose – over 250 breeds worldwide plus many designer dogs and untold numbers of mixed breed dogs. You can get a puppy, a grown dog, or an older dog. You can get a male or a female. You can get a dog from a shelter, a breeder, or a friend. You need to take your time to get the right dog for you.

Every year 5 to 8 million dogs are relinquished to shelters. Why? In most cases, the family is simply not prepared for the type of dog they have. Many of these dogs are later euthanized.

It is important, therefore, to make sure you know what you are getting. It is just as important to be fully prepared for your dog or puppy and the commitment it will need. The Mini Course on Adopting a Dog will help you learn the costs and demands of dog adoption and ownership.

How to Choose a Good, Ethical Breeder?

Once you decide for sure to get a dog, you will have to figure out where to get it and how to choose the best one for you.

Will you get your dog from a friend or a family?

Do you want to get a puppy from a breeder? If so, how will you select the right breeder?

Is a pet store a good source for a dog?

Are you looking for a rescued dog to adopt?

What questions should you ask at the Pet Store or of the Breeder?

How can you identify a healthy dog or puppy with the right temperament?

And, finally, you will need to know how to prepare your home and your family members before you get the new dog. How to get your dog adjusted to your home environment?

Get access to the FREE Course on Adopting and Owning a Dog and find out answers to all these important questions. This FREE Course on Dog Adoption is meant for people like you who need help locating their best dog. Follow the step-by-step instructions from our Mini Course and you will set the path to a long-lasting and loving relationship with your dog.

What Characteristics do You Want Your Dog to Have?

Herding Dogs

Herding dogs are intelligent and obedient dogs who are gentle and patient with children.

Sporting Dogs

Sporting dogs are active, easily trained, intelligent dogs who love to work and to play games with their owners.

Working Dogs

Working dogs are generally large and well-muscled dogs who desire to work hard and please their owners. Although the energetic.

Hound Dogs

Hound dogs instinctively follow their noses or eyes, they tend to be loving companions who are easily motivated with food.

Terriers

The Terrier personality is feisty and energetic, but they adapt well to apartment life and some are well-suited to allergy sufferers.

Most dog breeds originally had specific jobs for which they were bred. However, in today’s world they do not have those jobs. If you choose a dog from a breed with high energy or very high intelligence, be prepared to keep your dog active and busy.

Join our experts to learn how to decide on the dog that would suit you and your family the best.

Just enter your name and email ID and we will start sending you the mini course through email – straight to your Inbox.

The Adopting and Owning a Dog minicourse will give you:

10 questions to assess your readiness for dog ownership

Sample costs of owning a dog

The myths and truths about neutering and spaying

How to find a veterinarian you will trust

The pros and cons of adopting a puppy versus an adult dog

8 tests to identify the perfect puppy

11 tests to identify the best adult dog

How to prepare your home for a new dog

What you will need to purchase for your new dog

How to find and adopt a healthy and happy shelter dog

Mini-Course on Dog / Puppy Adoption

When you subscribe to our FREE course on Dog / Puppy Adoption, you will discover expert tips on selecting your dream companion!!

Get the first email to your Inbox in the next 3 minutes to learn which dog breed suits you the most, should you adopt a puppy or an adult dog and how to select the one with the right temperament – learn all this from the comfort of your own home!

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By Michele Welton, Dog Trainer, Breed Selection Consultant, Author of 15 Dog Books

How to find and adopt a healthy and happy shelter dog

The right dog from the animal shelter can make a wonderful pet.

Every night you pass the animal shelter on your way home from work. Their sign pleads, “Save a life. Adopt one of our dogs!”

Should you consider adopting a dog from the animal shelter?

An important consideration for many prospective owners is money. Shelter dogs cost much less than a dog from a good breeder.

But what kind of dog will you be getting for so little money?

Maybe the best dog in the world.

Maybe the worst dog in the world.

The biggest disadvantage, you see, of animal shelters and humane societies is the unpredictability of what you’ll find inside.

Why dogs are dropped off at the animal shelter

Some dogs are at the shelter because they had behavior problems.

  • “He’s not housebroken.”
  • “He barks too much.”
  • “He digs holes in our garden.”
  • “He chews things up when we leave him alone.”
  • “He keeps climbing over the fence.”
  • “He’s not good with our cat.”
  • “He’s not good with our other dog.”
  • “He’s not good with our kids.”
  • “He bit me.”

But most dog behavior problems are caused by owners. The owner left the dog alone too much. Or left him outside too much. Or didn’t provide enough exercise or interesting activities to do. Or simply didn’t teach their dog how to be well-behaved or hold the dog accountable (provide consequences) for bad behavior.

If a new owner offers more companionship, an indoor lifestyle, more exercise, and consistent training and consequences, the majority of so-called “problem dogs” change their tune quickly and make fabulous companions.

Some dogs are at the shelter simply because they got lost and were never claimed.

Some dogs are at the shelter because they developed a health problem that their owner couldn’t (or didn’t want to) deal with. The dog might need a special diet, or daily pills, or insulin shots, or surgery, or he might have vision or hearing problems.

Some dogs are at the shelter for some other reason that has nothing to do with the dog’s ability to make a fine pet:

  • “He’s too big for our apartment.”
  • “He sheds too much.”
  • “My child is allergic to him.”
  • “Our other dog doesn’t like him.”
  • “Our landlord says no dogs.”
  • “I’m getting a full time job.”
  • “We have a new baby. I don’t have time for a dog.”
  • “I’m getting married and my new spouse doesn’t like dogs.”

And some dogs are at the shelter simply because they committed the cardinal sin of growing old. They can’t get around so well anymore. They can’t see or hear so well. They’re just “no fun” anymore.

It’s hard to believe that people can be so cruel. Especially when senior dogs can be so calm and well-behaved, which may be exactly the kind of dog you’re looking for.

But you must be careful

How to find and adopt a healthy and happy shelter dogThe dog of your dreams could be sitting in your local animal shelter right now, hoping someone will give him a chance to prove what a wonderful companion he can be.

But you need to go in with your eyes open – not just your heart.

Most dogs at the animal shelter can make great pets for someone who is well-matched to them, but that someone may not be YOU.

Before going to look at shelter dogs, you need to determine the general kind of dog you’re best suited to – how much grooming you’re willing to do, how much shedding you can handle, how much exercise you can provide, and so on.

And you need to know how to evaluate the temperament of a shelter dog, so you can judge whether he or she is likely to make a good pet.

I’ll show you how to do that in my book, Dog Quest: Find The Dog Of Your Dreams.

We’ll talk about how to match you up with the right kind of dog, based on 17 key characteristics.

We’ll talk about whether you should get a male or a female, a puppy or an adult dog.

And I’ll tell you how to use simple personality tests to evaluate a shelter dog’s suitability as a pet. how to test for possessiveness and aggression in a seemingly friendly dog. and how to quickly evaluate a shelter dog’s health

About the author: Michele Welton has over 40 years of experience as a Dog Trainer, Dog Breed Consultant, and founder of three Dog Training Centers. An expert researcher and author of 15 books about dogs, she loves helping people choose, train, and care for their dogs.

I’ve supported animal rescue organizations for many years. I’ve participated in adoption events, community awareness presentations, and animal socialization sessions. I’ve cleaned my fair share of dog runs. I even spent time as the president of the Humane Society of Forsyth County (Georgia), a no-kill shelter. Anything I could do to help a dog or cat get adopted, I have done, and I expect to continue doing so for many years ahead.

How to find and adopt a healthy and happy shelter dog

Often people approach me looking for a specific type of dog. They’ve either had a dog of that breed in the past or know someone who has one now. Sometimes, though not as often as I would like, they’ve put a lot of time into researching various breeds to determine the ones that might be the right fit for their family or individual lifestyle.

I try to persuade them that all dogs have their own personalities, regardless of breed specifics. Many non-purebred dogs are wonderful, healthy, and very smart. These dogs can make wonderful companions for their families.

If they still insist on adopting a purebred, I let them know that they are indeed available at local animal shelters and through animal rescues and breed-specific organizations. You can find a rescue organization for just about every breed of dog out there.

For example, we adopted our most recent Schnauzer, Kramer, from Schnauzer Love Rescue, which focuses on rescuing and adopting Schnauzers throughout the southeastern United States. There are also wonderful organizations like Arizona Golden Rescue, who find homes for Golden Retrievers, and Friends to the Forlorn, who rescue and rehome Pit Bulls.

How to find and adopt a healthy and happy shelter dog

I asked Nancy Delf at Schnauzer Love Rescue how her group finds dogs. “I think few people know to look for a rescue organization if they need to relinquish their dogs,” she says. “I’ve answered several Craigslist ads for rehoming Schnauzers.” Instead of their owners trying to find their dogs new homes online, she offers to take the Schnauzers into her rescue group. “ People just don’t know about, or don’t think about, turning their dog in to a breed-specific rescue. I think more people would turn their dogs in to us instead of taking them to county shelters, too, if they were just aware that this was an option.”

I asked Nancy what she believes to be the biggest misconception people have regarding rescue organizations. “People need to understand that many rescues are run entirely by volunteers,” she says. Her group is completely reliant on donations and adoption fees — and those fees are still probably less than SLR’s veterinarian costs, should a particular dog be kept for any length of time.

Nancy stressed that you’ll need to remain patient with any dog you bring into your home. But she says the upside of going to a group like hers is that you know what you’re getting, since they know the breed and are very familiar with the dogs in their care.

Some breed-specific organizations have operations in several states. “If there is a dog in Florida and someone in Tennessee wants to adopt the dog, we try to arrange transportation to get the dog to Tennessee or at least a little closer to the adopter’s location,” Nancy says. “We have a vast transport network. Ultimately, it would be better for the family to go to where the dog is to meet them initially because the dog would be in a comfortable setting for the first meeting. However, realistically, that can’t always happen.”

Here are five ways to learn more about breed-specific rescue groups and adoption.

1. Petfinder

Search Petfinder to locate specific breeds of dogs as well as breed-specific organizations nationally or in your area.

2. Dogster

Visit Dogster, especially our Dogster Heroes articles, which often deal with breed-specific rescue groups.

3. Web search

Use an Internet search engine to search for specific breeds. Use key words with the breed name, like “adoptable Schnauzers,” “Schnauzer rescues,” or “Schnauzers available for adoption.”

4. Pet supply stores

Visit larger pet supply stores during posted dog adoption events. There’s an adoption event virtually every weekend in my area, and you may find the breed of dog you’re looking for. Be sure to talk with the adoption event coordinator if you don’t see a dog you’re interested in. Often, they’ll have more dogs available for adoption or currently at foster homes.

5. Foster

Nancy also recommends fostering dogs for a local rescue organization. In doing so, you can meet several dogs and eventually you will find one that you cannot live without.

Have you adopted a dog from a breed-specific rescue? Do you have favorite rescues to recommend, or tips to share? Share your stories on Dogster.

Read more about breed-specific rescues and shelters:

Check out these other great Dogster articles by Tim Link:

About Tim Link: All-American guy who loves to rock out to Queen while consuming pizza and Pinot Noir and prefers to associate with open-minded people who love all critters. Considers himself to be the literal voice for all animals. Author, writer, radio host, Reiki Master, Animal Communicator and consultant at Wagging Tales.

Best of Adopting a Dog Posted by Guest Author on September 13th, 2010

Congratulations on choosing to adopt a rescue dog! Rescues and shelters everywhere house wonderful dogs, each of them just waiting to become a member of your household. While shelter dogs come from various backgrounds and experiences, they all share one important fact: they are dogs, and the dog you choose needs to be understood and treated as such. Just like us, dogs need order and leadership. They seek structure, structure which you must provide. Your dog needs to know that you that you have a set of house rules. This makes the transition from the shelter to your home easier, faster and more rewarding.

Below are tips to help ensure a smooth transition for your new furry friend.

  • Hold a family meeting to create rules about caring for the dog. Will he be allowed on the couch, the bed, and in all rooms of the house? Where will he sleep and eat? Who will walk him and clean up after him? As a family, you must all be consistent with your decisions or you will confuse the dog, usually resulting in the dog making his own rules and causing unnecessary tension.
  • Have the necessary items your dog will need from the start: ID tags, a collar and a 6 foot leash, food and water bowls, food, dog toys, a crate and bedding, and basic grooming tools.
  • Bring your new dog home when you can be there for a few days (ideally) so you can supervise him as he learns your house rules.
  • Just before you bring your dog into the home, take him for a walk to tire him out a little. Walks are not only good exercise, but they also serve as a training tool and an opportunity to establish the lines of communication that better educate him.

Establish Ground Rules in the First Days

  • At first, limit your dog to one room or area. This allows him time to become familiar with the smells and sounds of his new home. Try to limit your time away from home those first days; your spending time with him will help him to become more comfortable in his new, unfamiliar home.
  • Keep your dog on leash while inside your home for the first few weeks so you can immediately teach him what behaviors are and are not acceptable by showing and guiding him through the appropriate exercises. For safety’s sake, NEVER leave a leash on your dog when he is unsupervised.
  • Your rescue dog should NOT be left alone in the house with your existing pets until you have carefully monitored and controlled their interactions for a period of time. [See our dog to dog and dog to cat intro articles for tips.]
  • Expect housetraining accidents. Your dog is in a new territory and is establishing a new routine, so accidents probably will happen. Review housetraining information available from the shelter, your veterinarian or your local Bark Busters trainer. [More housetraining tips here.] The key is to be consistent and maintain a routine.
  • Dogs instinctively like to den, and a crate makes the ideal place for your dog to sleep and get away from household hubbub. While crate training also makes housetraining and training in general easier, limit the amount of time the dog is crated. The crate should be roomy enough to allow your dog to stand up, turn around, and lie down comfortably. An alternative to a crate is a dog-proofed part of your home, such as a laundry or mud room. You can use a tall climb-proof baby gate or dog gate to block off the area from the rest of the house.
  • Most rescue dogs have been given basic vaccinations and many have already been spayed or neutered. It is important that your dog is examined by a veterinarian within a week after adoption for a health check and any needed vaccinations. While there, arrange for the spay/neuter surgery if needed.
  • For the first few days, limit guest visits to allow your dog to get comfortable with his new family. When you do have guests, ask their help in training your dog by instructing them not to pay attention to him until he has calmed down. One way to communicate this request is to post a sign on your front door informing visitors that you have a new dog in training.

A Trained Dog Makes for a Happy Human-Canine Bond

    • Get guidance for training your dog. A well-trained dog is a happier dog and a joy to have around. Your animal shelter may have performed a behavioral evaluation on your dog to help the adopter understand what, if any, potential behavioral issues the dog may have. Knowing this information ahead of time may be helpful when you begin training with your new dog. If you already have a dog, whether he was adopted from a shelter or not, a helpful tool (called the Behavioral Rating Quiz) to determine how he compares to other dogs is available at www.BarkBusters.com.
    • Dogs need consistent pack structure. If they don’t have a consistent set of rules to follow, then they try to become the leader, which can create numerous behavioral problems. Thus, you—and all humans in your home—need to be consistent. Practice obedience training, set rules and apply them calmly and consistently, and praise your dog’s good behavior. He will be much more comfortable in a pack with structure and will bond more quickly to you.
    • It is amazing how quickly dogs learn what is acceptable and what is not.Dogs have a language of their own, and once we understand it, we can communicate better what we expect of them.

A Bright Future

Hats off to you for bringing home a rescue dog! Your patience and training will help to create a bond that will reward you both for years to come. With the right balance of discipline, understanding and affection, your rescue dog will become a loyal, grateful and loving companion.

This guest blog article is written by By Liam Crowe, CEO and Master Dog Behavioral Therapist at Bark Busters USA.

October is Adopt-A-Shelter-Dog Month, and we here at Doggyloot couldn’t be more excited to promote this worthy cause! With more dogs in need of forever homes than ever before, we know that raising awareness and celebrating this effort is crucially important – this month, and every month. Throughout the month of October, we’ll be bringing you helpful tips, heartwarming stories, and everything in between to help spread the word about dog adoption.

How to find and adopt a healthy and happy shelter dog

You may be thinking to yourself, “Well heck, I love the idea of adopting a dog, and I know how important it is to do what I can to help save a life, but I just can’t adopt a new dog right now. What can I do?” Don’t worry! There are still many ways you can help needy dogs in your area and throughout the country. Here are a few ideas to get you started:

Raise Awareness Through Social Media

It’s no secret that dogs are extremely popular throughout the internet. Odds are that if you logged into your favorite social media service, be it Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram, you wouldn’t have to scroll for too long before finding an adorable puppy video, or a photo of a friend’s dog. Why not inject a little bit of activism into those popular pooch pics? Just caption a photo with a link to your local shelter’s website, or donate your status to raising awareness of Adopt-a-Shelter-Dog month. It’s that simple!

Help Your Local Shelter Get Needed Donations

It’s not always easy to find suitable forever homes for adoptable dogs, which can often lead to overcrowding, and an unfortunate lack of necessary resources in rescue facilities. Contact your local shelter to find out what types of donations they are most in need of, and offer to post fliers asking the community for those donations.

Volunteer

How to find and adopt a healthy and happy shelter dog

There are many ways that you can make a difference by volunteering your time and energy to your local shelter. Click here for some helpful tips and ideas for how you can help make an impact.

Foster

Adopting a dog is a lifelong commitment, and one that should never be taken lightly. Before taking that leap, it’s always a good idea to consider whether or not you are ready to adopt a dog. If you’re not quite ready to provide a forever home for a furry companion, but you’d still like to help a needy dog adjust to a happy home, you can certainly consider fostering. Many shelters offer fostering programs which allow you to enjoy the presence of a dog in your home, while relieving you of much of the financial and other commitments. Contact your local shelter to find out if you might be a viable candidate for dog fostering.

Write an Op-Ed for a Local Paper

Just because social media is more prominent these days, doesn’t mean that print media isn’t still a worthy avenue by which to spread the word about adoption. Submit an op-ed piece to your local newspaper about the benefits of adoption, or sharing a personal story about adoption that might motivate people in your community to take it into consideration for themselves.

How to find and adopt a healthy and happy shelter dog

Just because you can’t offer a forever home for a dog, doesn’t mean that you can’t help needy canines across the country find a loving family to join. These tips are just a few of the many ways in which you can make a huge difference for a deserving dog!

Help Rescue Animals

Provide food and vital supplies to shelter pets at The Animal Rescue Site for free! →

“Why buy while those in shelters die?”

It’s a pretty common mantra for pet rescue groups, one I’d taken to heart. Even as a kid, my family only adopted from shelters. As an adult, I got my dogs from rescue organizations, secretly judging friends who bought theirs from breeders.

For a long time, it was a point of pride for me. When I brought home Mookie in 2000, everyone told me how lucky I was to find such a sweet animal. The 18-pound Boston terrier mix adored every person he met. He chased frogs in my condo complex and loved to play with stuffed animals. He was more loyal and loving—not to mention happier to see me—than any of my dates.

When my job kept me in the office for long hours, I decided to get Mookie a buddy, Yogi. I loved him deeply. But just six months after adoption, Yogi was diagnosed with cancer. I didn’t balk at the expense and time it took to drag him to oncology appointments to treat his lymphoma. The chemo was supposed to buy me an extra year with him. Considering a dog’s average lifespan, that could mean 10 percent of his life.

And Yogi defied the odds. He hung on for nearly three years before passing away.

I didn’t handle his death well. Just three weeks later, I replaced him with a pug named Clarence.

Poor, simple-minded Clarence. He frequently planted himself halfway through the doggie door, unable to decide between sunbathing on the patio and sleeping under the air conditioning vent. Every time I came home, he cried as if I were a soldier returning from war.

Clarence looked like Yogi, but the only thing they had in common was a penchant for serious health issues. I kept telling myself that at least Clarence didn’t have cancer. But his problems were almost worse. His epilepsy was difficult to control, and the phenobarbital he took to subdue his seizures caused weight gain, liver deterioration and anxiety. I got tired of veterinary specialists focusing on the fact that he was fat rather than helping me figure out how to get the dog to sleep at night.

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3-year old female Beagle-mix dog. Good with people and children. Good with dogs. Cats unknown. However, she

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

Baelee is a 4 year old male yorkie. He had FHO hip surgery in 2018 and has been well ever since. He is microchipped

Cami is a 4 year old Sheltie that is very intelligent, knows many commands and loves to run and play ball. She is

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

This dog is located in Middletown, DE. If you’re interested in this dog, please contact the foster directly:

This dog is located in Middletown, DE. If you’re interested in this dog, please contact the foster directly:

This dog is located in Middletown, DE. If you’re interested in this dog, please contact the foster directly:

This dog is located in Middletown, DE. If you’re interested in this dog, please contact the foster directly:

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

Meet Luna. She is loved beyond measure and most of the time a very good girl. Her favorite activities are

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

Roswell will be euthanized on Thursday if a home is not found for him. He’s a King Corso and I have a very loving

ABUSED NEGLECTED ABANDONED NOW AT KILL SHELTER THIS POOR SWEET BABY GIRL PLEASE HELP THIS LOVELY GIRL Love came in

These puppies were rescued from a high kill shelter, and are now available for adoption! They have been vaccinated,

Coco is a very energetic puppy who needs to go to an active family. She’s a dominator when it comes to food and

Max is a five year old male vizsla lab mix who just wants someone to play ball with him and cuddle with at the end

KAIA IS IN TROUBLE TERRIFIED MEANS DEATH IN HOGH KILL SHELTER AND BY THE LOOK OF HER TAIL SHE IS SUPER SCARED SHE

This post is going out with a pray that one special angel will will see sweet Brooklyn and give her a forever home

This boy knows sign language!! Seriously. Ace Morgan is the smartest boy – he knows alot of commands, both spoken

Bella is like that girl in grade school who probably couldn’t sit still or be quiet. So yes, she has to learn

Lola is a 1 1/2 yo female who has been with us since 6 weeks old. Lola has been through a lot of changes over the

I’m looking to re-home my beautiful girl Nala. This is one of the hardest things I’ve had to to choose to do.

This map shows how many Dogs are posted in other states.

Click on a number to view those needing rescue in that state.