How to fill an oxygen tank

Medical oxygen tanks may be filled at home using an oxygen tank fill system or delivered pre-filled by an oxygen therapy supply company. Oxygen therapy is an FDA-regulated medical treatment, and it must be prescribed by a doctor. The COPD Foundation and WebMD offer advice on how to establish home delivery.

The FDA has established guidelines to regulate the production and distribution of compressed medical gases such as oxygen. Medical gas suppliers deliver large volumes of compressed gases to licensed medical facilities. In the case of Medicare and Medicaid recipients, a certificate of medical necessity is required to substantiate the medical need of an item of durable medical equipment such as a portable oxygen delivery system. In most cases, the type of equipment or delivery system is not allowed to be changed for a period of five years, according to the COPD Foundation.

Once an individual gets a prescription for supplemental oxygen, the doctor will help determine which oxygen delivery system will meet specific needs. Oxygen supply companies lease the oxygen delivery equipment, repair or replace malfunctioning equipment, and establish a delivery schedule for the pre-filled tanks. Insurance companies may have established contracts or preferred partners, so WebMD recommends that patients request a list of local oxygen therapy supply companies from their insurance providers.

How to fill an oxygen tank

  • According to The Pricer, the cost of refilling an acetylene tank ranges from $22 for a 10-cubic foot-sized tank to $50 for a tank that’s larger than 3 feet (Source)
  • You may incur an environmental fee of about $10 when filling an acetylene tank in some states.
  • Most acetylene refill stores can either allow you to rent tanks or purchase new ones from them, thus making the costs vary greatly (Source)
  • Though buying your tank is more economical and convenient than renting, you should always compare the refilling rates at your local oxygen acetylene tank supplier.
  • Purchasing an acetylene tank in bulk or large quantities will help you save money since the per cubic foot price decreases as the tank becomes larger (Source)

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Cost Factors

The costs of refilling an oxygen-acetylene tank vary with the tank size, refill supplier, and local laws. Since it’s relatively expensive to fill the gas after a few days, you may want a tank that lasts long and affordable refill service. Here are the factors that affect the pricing for acetylene tank refills:

1. Size

Though small welding tanks are more portable and cheaper to refill, they run out of gas more often, primarily if you use them regularly. You may find it inconvenient to drop the tanks off at the refill station and get them back once they’re full. That’s because the refills may delay your project or productivity.

In this case, larger tanks won’t require frequent refilling, allowing you to focus on your most important projects. On the other hand, smaller tanks may have a low refill price but prove expensive in terms of convenience. That’s because of the potential income lost when they’re out of gas. (Source).

Acetylene refill stores also charge their services based on the size of tanks. Expect to pay more cash to have a large gas tank refilled. As a factor, size also applies to tank rentals. In this case, filling a larger rental tank will be costly than refilling a smaller rental tank.

2. Local Welding Laws

Familiarize yourself with your local welding laws to see how they affect the pricing and availability of acetylene tank refills. The Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) authority requires acetylene refill providers to meet certain gas storage conditions. These conditions include a dry, well-ventilated, and well-protected location that’s 20 feet from highly-flammable materials.

As a gas supplier spends more money to meet these standards, they’re likely to charge more on their refill services. They risk facing harsh penalties and fines if they fail to adhere to these rules. Local authorities also require these companies to obtain licenses and pay various fees in compliance with the law. Acetylene providers usually transfer these costs to the price of refills. (Source)

3. Refilling Company

Acetylene gas providers have different prices for their refill services. The prices usually depend on the costs of procuring and availing the gas for local clients. Most of these companies have websites with their prices listed. Take time comparing their rates before choosing a refill that will match your budget. (Source)

Some refilling companies charge a delivery fee, while others make free deliveries once the refills are complete. You can even take your existing air gas for filling, and they will give you a completely different tank. The gas provider may also be picky about the type and sizes of tanks they can refill. Call them to ask whether they accept acetylene gas cylinders that resemble those you have in your workplace.

The technique used to conduct the refills may also affect the pricing. A supplier that uses top-notch technology to fill gas tanks may charge more than one that doesn’t. The gas provider may again charge additional fees depending on the type of service they give. They may also have incentives such as price cuts or discounts in place that may affect the price of the refills.

Filling the tanks

  1. Commercial pressurized oxygen is distilled from liquid air in large batches.
  2. As the air expands, the pistons move, increasing the volume of the compartment and decreasing the pressure and temperature of the air.
  3. The air is then rotated through several expansion engines until liquefied.

Furthermore, how do you fill oxygen tanks in Minecraft? The Oxygen Compressor is a Galacticraft machine used to fill empty or depleted oxygen tanks. Connect an Oxygen Pipe to the blue ring input side and a power source to the grey square input side. Place an Oxygen Tank in the bottom right slot and it will take oxygen from the input and place it into the tank.

Considering this, where can I fill up my oxygen tank?

It is where the liquid oxygen is stored before it is put into portable tanks. For most home tanks, line up the filling connector on the bottom of the portable tank to the port on the top of the machine.

How much does it cost to refill oxygen tank?

When you factor in the cost of refilling the tank, the accessories you might need for regular use, and mandatory replacement parts, using a scuba tank for oxygen would cost you over $2,300 a year, compared to $598 and $798 for a three-year and lifetime warranty on a Inogen One G4, respectively.

Table of Contents

When you own a Co2 tank, filling one up for the first time with a scary-sounding machine like an air compressor can be, well, scary. The last thing anyone wants is some big metal canister blowing up or exploding in their faces because they didn’t know what they were doing.

First, let me put your mind at ease. That’s only going to happen in very rare circumstances. If you use your brain and a bit of common sense and follow the rules, you’ll never even get close to that happening. The fact you’re reading this means you’re already on the right track, so don’t worry.

Now, let’s go through how you can refill a Co2 tank. You’ll no longer have to keep taking it out and getting it filled up elsewhere. You won’t have to worry about all the transport and transfer issues when you can easily do it in your own house or workshop.

Is It Worth Refilling Your Tank Yourself?

If you’re using a Co2 canister a lot, then yes, it’s incredibly worth learning how to do it yourself. Think about much time, energy, effort, and money you spend already on filling up your gas canisters. Now consider a world where you can plug your Co2 canister into an air compressor, and it’s done.

You just need to know what you’re doing, so keep reading!

Drain Your Canister Fully

The absolute first step you’ll want to take is making sure your gas canister is empty. This point might sound obvious, but you’ll be amazed at how much gas they can squeeze into a canister. Even if your tank doesn’t have enough pressure to complete whatever task you’re putting it into, that doesn’t mean it’s completely empty.

The best way to check this is to fix up your canister to your air compressor hose. Ensure everything is screwed on tight both ends because you don’t want it flying off and around you when you’re putting compressed air through the hose line.

Once you’re sure everything is secure, unscrew the bleed-off valve at the top of your hose fitting. This will drain whatever gas is left in the canister. Keep this open until you hear or feel no more air coming out at all. You can also use the pressure gauges on your air compressor to see how much is left, but this will depend on the air compressor you’re using.

Once you’re finished, make sure you close the bleed-off valve as tight as you can. Double-check it again to make sure it’s closed properly. You don’t want any air or pressure escaping while you’re refilling it.

Refilling Your Co2 Tank with an Air Compressor

Now you’re ready to refill. Almost. First, check the size of your Co2 tank. Times whatever number this is by two. This result will give you the amount of time you need to keep your air compressor on for.
For example, if you’re filling up a 12-ounce tank, you’ll need to let your air compressor run for 24 seconds to fill it. Thankfully, this is nice and simple math. Try to get your timing as accurate and as close to the mark as possible for the best results. Try using an alarm on your watch or a stopwatch on your smartphone.

On some more modern devices, you’ll be able to set your air compressor for how much air you want to use, so it’s always worth checking to see if this setting is available.

Now you really are ready to go.

The moment you turn your air compressor on, you’ll want to start counting the seconds. If you can do this with two people – one turning the air compressor on and the other timing it, or both of you doing these simultaneously – that’s even better. If not, you can still do it yourself, but try to get the movements in sync.

Remember, you don’t need to turn your stopwatch off to finish the process. When you hit your refill time, just focus on turning the compressor off once you hit the time. Again, remember, refilling the tank in this way can be dangerous if not done properly, so always try to be as safe as you can. You don’t want to injure yourself or anyone around you.

Finalizing Your Refilling Process

Using the example above, if you’re filling up a 12-ounce tank for 24 seconds, as soon as you hit that 24 seconds mark, turn the air compressor off fully. When doing this, open the valve for five seconds to release any excess pressure and any air still inside the hose lines. If there’s any dirt or obstructions, this is when they’re cleared out. When you’re sure everything is cleared out, you can separate your air compressor from your tank by disconnecting the hose in the opposite way you connected them.

That’s pretty much it. As you can see, the process isn’t complicated or hard; it’s just a case of being mindful of how it all works, taking your time to set it up properly and safely, and then carrying the whole process out as accurately as you can.

Finally, you can now fill up your tanks easily and with no external effort. This will save an absolute ton of money and make your life easier in so many ways. Whether you’ve already got an air compressor yourself, using one from a friend, or thinking of getting on, there’s no reason you need to be afraid of the refilling process.

Key Safety Notes to Remember

Here are a few pointers that will help ensure your refill process is as safe as possible.

Firstly, never operate an air compressor under the influence of drugs, alcohol, or medication. Always be mindful of what you’re doing and minimize distractions. For example, don’t be on a phone call or talking to other people.

Be sure never to drop your Co2 tank at any point in the process, and make sure you remove any flammable materials or source of fire or ignition from the workspace where you’re refilling the tank. Follow this guide, and you’ll have a perfect refilling experience every single time.

You will need to determine which tank you have or which tank you will buy:

  1. 870 Medical oxygen tanks, requires a prescription from your doctor (recommended)
  2. 540 Industrial oxygen tanks, can be purchased at welding supply, Airgas, or Praxair

We recommend that you buy the oxygen tank locally … even though we sell them. It will save you money.

Oxygen tanks cannot be shipped full, they must be empty. No matter who you buy from.

This means you have to get the oxygen tank filled locally. It usually cost about $100-120 to purchase an oxygen tank and get it filled. It typically cost $20-$30 to get it filled.

We will happily sell you the oxygen tank, but it’s generally cheaper just to purchase locally… plus you still have to take it in to get it filled anyway.

Once you have your oxygen tank, these are your options –

For locating medical oxygen, Google this term:

  • Medical oxygen supply

For locating industrial oxygen, you can Google these terms:

  • Industrial oxygen suppliers
  • Welding suppliers

An 870 Medical Oxygen Tank requires a prescription first. Once you have a prescription you can go to a local home-care pharmacy and to get an 870 Medical oxygen tank. Ask for a size between 20-40 cu/ft. An oxygen tank this size will be about 5”x18”. We recommend the 870 tank over the 540.

A 540 Industrial Oxygen Tank does not require a prescription. You can find these at companies such as AirGas or Praxair. Simply request a new tank between 20-40 cu/ft.

Some locations, especially industrial, will make you swap out oxygen tanks. If you do not want to swap, call the location ahead of time and check.

Ask for 99% pure oxygen in your tank from an industrial supplier. Industrial oxygen suppliers will refuse to serve you if you are using it for a medical purpose.

Tanks come in all sizes, you can get as small or large as you want.

Home oxygen therapy is an attractive option for patients who need oxygen assistance but aren’t ill enough to stay in the hospital. Patients with asthma, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, lung cancer or other conditions that cause difficulty breathing can all benefit from home oxygen therapy. A doctor prescribes the oxygen, including the kind of oxygen assistance and the rate of flow. Then, a home oxygen supplier comes to the home on a regular schedule and refills the oxygen tanks. Liquid oxygen is growing in popularity because it does not require electricity, unlike compressed oxygen.

Things You’ll Need

  • Dewar
  • Patient’s tank

    Check the patient’s tank for air leaks and liquid leaks at all pipe connections. If the tank has signs of leaks, do not attempt to fill it; use a different tank.

    Clean the hose coupling on top of the patient’s tank, as well as the coupling on the hose, to make sure there is no dirt or moisture. Dirt or moisture can cause liquid entering the tank to leak or spray, which can cause injury or cause the coupling to freeze; the coupling may not be able to release the hose.

    Open the liquid release valve on the master dewar (the primary holding tank).

    Attach the hose from the dewar to the patient’s tank via the hose coupling.

    Open the pressure release valve on the patient’s tank. The dewar will now begin to gravity feed the patient’s tank.

    Keep eye on the patient’s tank pressure; follow the manufacturer’s instructions on pressure settings for the tank.

    Once the tank is filled, liquid will begin to spurt from the pressure release vent on the patient’s tank. Shut off the main valve on the dewar, close the pressure release valve on the patient’s tank and remove the hose.

    Check patient’s tank for pressure, air and liquid leaks. It leaks are present, do not give the tank to the patient. Leaking tanks can cause an over-saturation of oxygen in environmental air, which can cause headaches and high blood pressure. If the oxygen saturation gets very high, it can cause open flames, such as from the stove, matches, lighters, candles and cigarettes, to ignite and cause injury to the patient.

    Reattach all of the hoses to the tank and set the patient’s prescribed oxygen liter flow, and continue the oxygen therapy.

    • Liquid oxygen is very cold. It will cause instant frostbite. Do not touch the oxygen when it is in liquid form.
    • Do not allow the oxygen to become over-saturated and leak into the patient’s home or it will present a fire risk.

    … even though we sell them. It will save you money.

    Oxygen tanks cannot be shipped full, they must be empty. No matter who you buy from.

    This means you have to get the oxygen tank filled locally. It usually cost about $100-120 to purchase an oxygen tank and get it filled. It typically cost $20-$30 to get it filled.

    We will happily sell you the oxygen tank, but it’s generally cheaper just to purchase locally… plus you still have to take it in to get it filled anyway.

    You will need to determine which tank you have or which tank you will buy:

    1. 870 Medical oxygen tanks, requires a prescription from your doctor (recommended)
    2. 540 Industrial oxygen tanks, can be purchased at welding supply, Airgas, or Praxair

    Once you have your oxygen tank, these are your options –

    For locating medical oxygen, Google this term:

    • Medical oxygen supply

    For locating industrial oxygen, you can Google these terms:

    • Industrial oxygen suppliers
    • Welding suppliers

    An 870 Medical Oxygen Tank requires a prescription first. Once you have a prescription you can go to a local home-care pharmacy and to get an 870 Medical oxygen tank. Ask for a size between 20-40 cu/ft. An oxygen tank this size will be about 5”x18”. We recommend the 870 tank over the 540.

    A 540 Industrial Oxygen Tank does not require a prescription. You can find these at companies such as AirGas or Praxair. Simply request a new tank between 20-40 cu/ft.

    Some locations, especially industrial, will make you swap out oxygen tanks. If you do not want to swap, call the location ahead of time and check.

    Ask for 99% pure oxygen in your tank from an industrial supplier. Industrial oxygen suppliers will refuse to serve you if you are using it for a medical purpose.

    Tanks come in all sizes, you can get as small or large as you want.

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    • Join Date: Sep 2009
    • Posts: 571

    Filling small tanks

    I have a 211 on the way.

    Now I have to figure out what size gas bottles to get. Maybe get the large rental to keep in the shop.

    The largest purchase size is the 160 at my LWS.

    The 160 is still kind of heavy so thinking for my truck I’ll get the 80. Should get close to 4 hours out of it and I need to save space and weight.

    There has got to be a way to refill the small tank from the large (225 I think) tank. I saw a post about it somewhere online but lost it. I would like to have that option with such a small tank or I may need to rethink for a 160 portable.

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 901

    Comment

    • Join Date: Sep 2005
    • Posts: 2491

    I hesitate to post but here it is.

    Do not do this with acetylene!! Do not do this with any flammable gas either!!

    Even other gases can be dangerous. High pressure, suffocation from oxygen displacement, bottle turned into a missle, explosion, etc.

    Get two appropriate cgaxxx nuts & nipples + a 3000# tee + a gauge. Do not use a rubber hose, just the fittings. Tighten it all up then open empty bottle valve all the way then crack open the full bottle a tiny bit & let it fill slowly. If you fill it to fast it will create a lot of heat. Close all valves & crack open a nut to release pressure then remove. The bottles will equalize in pressure so your not actually filling the smaller one all the way.

    Do not do this with acetylene!! Do not do this with any flammable gas either!!

    Comment

    • Join Date: Jul 2010
    • Posts: 300

    Comment

    • Join Date: Dec 2004
    • Posts: 132

    Western makes the fittings. Your local welding supply should be able to get them, they are replacement nipples that attachs your regulator to bottle. I have been fill my small bottles for years with no problem. Just cannot fill acelylene.

    Comment

    • Join Date: Dec 2012
    • Posts: 70

    I believe you, and I won’t, but I gotta know. What would happen?

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    • Join Date: Sep 2005
    • Posts: 877

    Comment

    • Join Date: Sep 2005
    • Posts: 2491

    Acetylene gets very unstable (explosive) above 15 psi if not in a controlled environment (like inside an acetylene tank filled with I believe it’s acetone). I was always told the acetone absorbs the acetylene to keep the molecules from bouncing off each other & exploding. This is why your low side gauge has a big red area after 15#. If you tried refilling from tank to tank you would fill your new tank with only acetylene gas & have a very unstable bottle although you might not even get it filled before it went boom.

    Feel free to correct me if I’m wrong here. Here is a copy & paste.

    Pure acetylene is a colourless gas with a pleasant odour; as prepared from calcium carbide it usually contains traces of phosphine that cause an unpleasant garliclike odour. Acetylene can be decomposed to its elements with the liberation of heat. The decomposition may or may not give rise to explosions, depending on conditions. Pure acetylene under pressure in excess of about 15 pounds per square inch or in liquid or solid form explodes with extreme violence.

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    • Join Date: Jul 2010
    • Posts: 300

    Comment

    • Join Date: Sep 2005
    • Posts: 2491

    Here is a better explanation.

    ACETYLENE CYLINDERS.—Acetylene stored in a free state under pressure greater than 15 psi can be made to break down by heat or shock and possibly explode. Under pressure of 29.4 psi, acetylene becomes self-explosive, and a slight shock will cause it to explode spontaneously. However, when dissolved in acetone, it Figure 15-27.—Acetylene cylinder. can be compressed into cylinders at pressures up to 250 psi. The acetylene cylinder (fig. 15-27) is filled with porous materials, such as balsa wood, charcoal, and shredded asbestos, to decrease the size of the open spaces in the cylinder. Acetone, a colorless, flammable liquid, is added until about 40 percent of the porous material is filled. The filler acts as a large sponge to absorb the acetone, which, in turn, absorbs the acetylene. In this process, the volume of the acetone increases as it absorbs the acetylene, while acetylene, being a gas, decreases in volume. The acetylene cylinders are equipped with safety plugs, which have a small hole through the center. This hole is filled with a metal alloy, which melts at approximately 212°F or releases at 500 psi. When a cylinder is overheated, the plug will melt and permit the acetylene to escape before a dangerous pressure can build up. The plug hole is too small to permit a flame to burn back into the cylinder if the escaping acetylene should become ignited.