How to donate to a food charity

One of the biggest problems the world faces today is world hunger. After it has been declining for a decade, global hunger has been rising again. According to a United Nations report, in 2016 global hunger affected 815 million people. In 2017, there were 38 million more that suffered. In this context, it’s time to stop and see what are the companies that donate food to nonprofit organizations to help the less fortunate.

Companies that Donate Food to Nonprofit Organizations as a Model

1. Target

After the store team leader at Target had visited the Greater Chicago Food Depository, the entire company made an important decision. Instead of throwing away the food products that presented any cosmetic imperfections, they decided to donate them to the Food Depository. Soon, they implemented a national policy that enables this on a national level.

2. Giant Food Stores & Martin’s Food Markets

The supermarket chains Giant Food Stores and Martin’s Food Markets donated both cash and food products to various charities in the states where they have their stores. For example, in 2010 they totaled $19.1 million, which was impressive. They did it thanks to their theme, ‘Living Here. Giving Here.’ Among the charities that benefitted we can count United Way, Children’s Miracle Network, as well as other hunger relief organizations.

3. Goodness Greens

Goodness Greens is an organic produce distributor that works in Chicago. They, too, decided to donate their excess fruits and vegetables to the same Greater Chicago Food Depository we were talking about earlier. The food will further reach those who live in low-income neighborhoods, as well local food pantries. Both entities work together to make sure that they deliver fresh produce.

4. Tyson Foods and Delaware North

Back in 2011, the Food Bank in Western New York, found in Buffalo, received around 29,000 lbs. of boneless chicken from Tyson Foods, together with Delaware North. Ever since then, both have been some of the best companies that donate food to nonprofit organizations, which we should take as an example. Since poultry is generally rich in nutrients, it is perfect for those who need some extra protein, such as young children or the elderly. And if you’re wondering, The Food Bank of Western New York helps four counties, offering food to an impressive number of 100,000 each year.

5. Panera Bread

Panera Bread is the name of a popular bakery-café chain that helped fight world hunger right from the start. Each day, when their schedule ends, all their locations donate the baked goods and the bread that doesn’t get sold to the local hunger relief agencies. Moreover, every neighborhood branch has a Panera Cares Community Breadbox, where you can donate as well. Next, they are partnering with Feeding America to distribute the funds to other local nonprofits.

6. Walmart

Back in 2010, Walmart, together with the Walmart Foundation, started the Fighting Hunger Together program. It was, in fact, a commitment that lasted through 2015 to fight this problem in America. They managed to achieve their goal one year early, totaling $260 million cash and $2.6 billion in in-kind donations. Only in 2013, they managed to donate over 571 million pounds of food. Plus, they set up an employee volunteering platform which proved to be very successful as well.

7. Darden Restaurants

Darden Restaurants is one of the companies that donate food to nonprofit organizations. If the name doesn’t sound familiar to you, you may remember it from the Fortune 500, where it got thanks to brands like LongHorn Steakhouse, Bahama Breeze, or Olive Garden. Back in 2003, they started the Darden Harvest program, which aimed to rescue food from landfills and bring it to those who needed it. All the Darden restaurants participated in this program and managed to donate over 77 million pounds of food to hungry families since they started it.

8. Cisco

For more than a decade now, Cisco has been using employees’ volunteer time and donations to fight hunger and food insecurity all around the world. They have an annual campaign called the Global Hunger Relief Campaign, which supports over 160 nonprofits, as well as NGOs. In 2014, for example, the Cisco employees volunteered for 44,000 hours at various hunger relief nonprofits. Shortly, the company tripled all the donations coming both from employees and other donors.

9. Kellogg

Kellogg is one of the companies that donate food to nonprofit organizations that have been fighting for this for more than 30 years. They have an initiative called Breakfasts for Better Days, which means they are donating 1 billion servings of cereal and snacks. On average, they donate more than $20 million each year, in food products, for hunger and disaster relief. Moreover, they partner with various food bank networks across the globe, as well as with Feeding America.

10. Morgan Stanley

Back in 2014, Morgan Stanley was the company to launch Healthy Cities. This is a program that aims to coordinate nutrition, wellness, and play resources for children. They worked together with national, as well as local nonprofits. According to Feeding America, this program connected separate programs and put together a package for wellness education and screenings, healthy food, plus safe play spaces.

11. Yum! Brands

Yum! Brands is the name of the largest restaurant company, which owns brands like Taco Bell, Pizza Hut, and KFC. In 2007, they started the World Hunger Relief program, which was a personal passion for the CEO, David Novak. The program aims to raise awareness, funds, and volunteerism and help feed hungry people. They send all the donations to the United Nations World Food Program.

How to donate to a food charity

The food donation process happening at Yum! Brands. Image courtesy of Yum! Brands.

Conclusion

There are plenty of companies that donate food to nonprofit organizations, which should serve as an example for all the other businesses. Luckily, there are more and more entrepreneurs and managers who decide to involve the company they work at in such generous volunteering or donating programs. And this is all for the best since world hunger still represents a big issue in today’s world. If you’re feeling inspired by their gestures, you can head to various donation sites online and make a change.

Donations

Donating wholesome food for human consumption diverts food waste from landfills and puts food on the table for families in need.

  • Donations of nonperishable and unspoiled perishable food from homes and businesses help stock the shelves at food banks, soup kitchens, pantries, and shelters.
  • Donations of perishable prepared foods — typically collected from restaurants, caterers, corporate dining rooms, college campuses, hotels, and other food establishments — also help feed families in need, although such donations usually require special handling such as refrigerated trucks and prompt distribution.
  • Donations from farmers and gleaners help put more fresh produce in the diets of families in need.

Federal provisions to encourage food donation

The federal government has established three notable provisions to encourage the donation of wholesome food to those in need:

Limited liability protection for donors

The Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act of 1996 (PDF, 207 KB) encourages the donation of food and grocery products to nonprofit organizations for distribution to needy individuals. The Act exempts “persons and gleaners” who make good faith donations of food to nonprofit organizations that feed the hungry from liability for injuries arising from the consumption of the donated food.

Under the Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act, the following food donation standards apply:

Persons and gleaners (including qualified direct donors): Persons and gleaners, including qualified direct donors, shall not be subject to civil or criminal liability arising from the nature, age, packaging, or condition of apparently wholesome food that the person or gleaner donates in good faith to a nonprofit organization for ultimate distribution to needy individuals.

Nonprofit organizations: Nonprofit organizations shall not be subject to civil or criminal liability arising from the nature, age, packaging, or condition of apparently wholesome food that the nonprofit organization received as a donation in good faith from a person or gleaner, including a qualified direct donor, for ultimate distribution to needy individuals.

Donations of apparently wholesome food by qualified direct donors must be made in compliance with applicable state and local health, food safety, and food handling laws (including regulations).

A number of organizations offer legal guidance on food recovery and the Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Act:

  • The Cornell Law School, through its Legal Information Institute, provides a dissection of the law.
  • The University of Arkansas School of Law’s Food Recovery Project offer a legal guide to food recovery (PDF, 8.6 MB) and a Legal Guide to the Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act.
  • The Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic and the University of Arkansas School of Law’s Food Recovery Project offer a Federal Enhanced Tax Deduction for Food Donation: A Legal Guide (PDF, 16.7 MB) as a resource for food businesses and food recovery organizations to determine whether a food donor is eligible to receive the enhanced tax deduction.

Enhanced tax deductions

The Internal Revenue Code 170(e)(3) (PDF, 253 KB) of 2011 provides enhanced tax deductions to businesses to encourage donations of fit and wholesome food to qualified nonprofit organizations serving the poor and needy. Qualified business taxpayers can deduct the cost to produce the food and half the difference between the cost and full fair market value of the donated food. In December 2015, the U.S. Congress passed the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act, making permanent and extending the enhanced tax deductions to all businesses, including C-corporations, S-corporations, limited liability corporations (LLCs), partnerships, and sole proprietorships.

A number of organizations offer guidance on tax deductions for food donation:

  • The Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic and the University of Arkansas School of Law’s Food Recovery Project offers a free resource Federal Enhanced Tax Deduction for Food Donation: A Legal Guide (PDF, 16 MB)
  • The Natural Resources Defense Council offers a one-page A Farmer’s Guide to the Enhanced Federal Tax Deduction for Food Donation (PDF, 63 KB)

Federal agencies and donations

The U.S. Federal Food Donation Act of 2008 (PDF, 142 KB) specifies procurement contract language that encourages federal agencies and contractors to donate excess wholesome food to eligible nonprofit organizations to feed food-insecure people in the United States.

Anyone can be a food donor

Anyone can donate food, including farmers, distributors, wholesalers, retailers, restaurants, cafeterias, hotels, cruise ships, and households, just to name a few.

  • EPA’s Excess Food Opportunities Map is an interactive tool that displays the locations of nearly 1.2 million potential industrial, commercial and institutional excess food generators and more than 4,000 potential recipients.
  • Gleaning is the collection of excess fresh foods from farms, gardens, farmers markets, and other sources to provide it to those in need. Typically, volunteers partner with a farm to glean excess fresh produce and deliver it to a food bank or food pantry. Learn how to develop a successful gleaning program with this USDA toolkit (PDF, 630 KB).

Places to donate food

There are food recipient organizations across the country. The following sites offer tools to help donors find nearby food banks, pantries, soup kitchens and shelters that may accept wholesome, excess food.

They need your help now more than ever.

How to donate to a food charity

The news around the COVID-19 outbreak is constantly changing, but information about food safety and how to keep yourself healthy is crucial right now. Here is a comprehensive list on the foods you should be stocking up on during this period of social distancing, as well as information about your local grocery stores’ changing hours, an explanation of “no-contact delivery,” and a guide on how to help your community and its businesses throughout closures.

The food and hospitality industry has been hit hard by the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak and social distancing regulations, with as many as five to seven million restaurant workers in danger of losing their jobs as a result. In addition, the crisis has increased pressure on food banks and food-related missions.

Below, we’ve listed some non-profits and initiatives dedicated to food-related causes, from providing grants to restaurant employees to combatting hunger. This is by no means an exhaustive list, but it’s a great place to start. Our list is focused mainly on national causes so it’s as wide-reaching as possible.

Children of Restaurant Employees

This organization (known as CORE for short) supports families of food and hospitality employees through life-altering events. Currently, they are supporting food and beverages employees who are parents and have been diagnosed with COVID-19.

Dining Bond Initiative

Through this initiative, customers can purchase restaurant bonds now to be used when restaurants are open for business again. These bonds are often sold at a price lower than face value, but how much so is determined by the individual restaurant. This map of participating restaurants is where you can start; you’ll need to contact your preferred restaurant individually.

F.A.R.M.S

This non-profit helps farmers from under-served communities retain land ownership. They also run the Farmer’s Emergency Fund, which provides funds to small farmers facing hardships.

Feeding America

The U.S.’s largest domestic hunger-relief organization, it is comprised of a network of more than 200 food banks around the country and feeds more than 46 million people each year.

Food Recovery Network

This student-led organization combats food waste by taking surplus food from college campuses and delivering it to organizations that need it.

James Beard Foundation Food and Beverage Industry Relief Fund

This foundation is designed to aid small, independent restaurants that are struggling as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak and which have an immediate and urgent financial need.

Meals on Wheels

This organization provides meals to seniors who are at risk of hunger and/or isolation. Meals on Wheels delivers across the country.

Pizza Vs. Pandemic

A collaboration between Slice Out Hunger, Pizza to the Polls, and the Slice (an online and mobile ordering platform for local pizzerias), they send pizzas from local shops to hospitals and other medical centers.

One Fair Wage Emergency Fund

This organization provides cash assistance to restaurant workers and other service employees who have been financially affected as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Restaurant Worker Disaster Relief Fund

Restaurant Opportunities Centers United is giving financial assistance to restaurant workers affected by the coronavirus outbreak and its effects.

Restaurant Employee Relief Fund

The National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation is giving $500 grants to restaurant employees who have lost their jobs because of the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Restaurant Workers’ Community Foundation

This fund is donating to non-profits that benefit restaurant workers, giving zero-interest loans to restaurants and giving financial relief to workers directly.

USBG Bartender Emergency Assistance Program

This program gives financial assistance to bartenders—as well as children and spouses of bartenders—affected by a crisis or hardship.

World Central Kitchen

This non-profit was founded by José Andrés and sets up community kitchens and food relief where it’s needed most. This has included everything from serving food to hurricane victims to those quarantined on cruise ships.

How to donate to a food charity

So, you’re ready to donate food to your local food bank. That’s great! Whether you’re starting a food drive or just planning to grab a few extra items for donation while out grocery shopping, there are a couple of things you should know about what you can (and should) donate and what food banks won’t accept.

What food you CAN donate to your local food bank:

This part is pretty easy. Food banks accept dry and canned food donations. What does that mean? Basically, any food that is “shelf-stable” or nonperishable – you can keep it in your pantry and it won’t go bad. And remember, only donate food that hasn’t reached its “sell-by” date yet. Specifically, food banks often need items like:

  • Peanut butter
  • Canned soup
  • Canned fruit
  • Canned vegetables
  • Canned stew
  • Canned fish
  • Canned beans
  • Pasta (most prefer whole grain)
  • Rice (most prefer brown rice)

That’s definitely not an exhaustive list but it covers a lot of what food banks and clients regularly need. Additionally, some food banks accept personal care and household items, since many families struggle to afford these items and they aren’t covered by other food assistance programs like SNAP.

If you’re still stumped about what to donate, just look in your own pantry. Families struggling with hunger often can’t afford the staples that we normally have stocked at home. So, check your pantry out and go from there. Even specialty foods like olive oil, dressings, or marinades can be helpful if they don’t need to be refrigerated.

Speaking of refrigeration, that leads to…

Ready to do more?

What not to donate to a food bank

The number one rule to remember is this: if your donation is perishable, i.e. it’s something that has a limited shelf life if not refrigerated, food banks won’t accept it. But there are other categories of food that you can’t donate. We’ve broken it all down into this handy list:

  • Items needing refrigeration: As we’ve already mentioned, this is the big one. Food like produce, dairy, and meat can spoil easily and your local food bank may not have the refrigerator or freezer space needed to keep these items fresh. While an individual can’t donate a bunch of bananas or a frozen turkey, many food banks do work directly with farmers, retailers, restaurants, and other companies to source these perishable foods for donation. And, Feeding America helps ensure its network has access to these healthy foods year-round.
  • Expired food: When considering what to donate, think about what you’d be comfortable serving your family. Chances are, you don’t eat food that’s past its “use-by” or “sell-by” date, so avoid donating anything past those dates to food banks as it could be unsafe to eat.
  • Leftovers: While it may be tempting to want to share the bountiful food from big meals like Thanksgiving, it’s best to keep leftovers for the family. To ensure the people they serve are safe, food banks can’t accept leftovers or anything made in personal kitchens because they aren’t individually sealed and the food bank can’t verify the ingredients or preparation process.
  • Food with packaging concerns: This includes food with damaged packaging such as dented or bloated cans, packaging that is already open, or even items in glass containers, which can shatter and cause food safety concerns for any other food they’re stored near. A good rule of thumb is if you wouldn’t consider buying it new, don’t donate it.
  • Baked goods: Similar to leftovers, since food banks can’t confirm how your baked goods were made or their ingredients, they can’t be donated. But, food banks often have relationships with local restaurants or bakeries which will donate extra food that is properly labeled and handled to nearby pantries, soup kitchens or shelters.
Where can I donate food near me?

Now that you’re in the know, take action! If you’re ready to make a donation or still have a question about what your local food bank accepts, use our food bank finder to locate the Feeding America food bank in your area. Or, if you’ve decided a food donation isn’t your thing, consider making a monetary donation instead! Food banks can put your dollars to excellent use.

With so many charities in need of help, you may want to consider donating to a charity in someone else’s name.

These kinds of donations make great gifts, especially if you can find a charity that will mean something to the gift recipient.

Keep reading to learn everything you need to know about donating to a charity in someone else’s name.

What does it mean to make a donation in honor of someone?

Donating in honor of someone means that you’re giving to a charity with that person in mind. It does not mean that the donation comes from that person, but that the donor wants the donation to be associated with a certain person.

Often, charities will have the option of choosing whether you want the donation plaque/letter to say “in honor of” or “in memory of”. If it says “in honor of” that usually means that this person is still living. However, “in memory of” likely means that the person has died.

For example, you might use the “in memory of” line if you’re donating to a breast cancer research organization and you want to associate the name of a relative who died of breast cancer with the research center.

Is it legal to make a donation in someone else’s name?

Absolutely! It is perfectly legal to make a donation in someone else’s name.

However, keep in mind that this does not mean that all of the information that you fill out when making a donation will be their information. Most organizations will have a place where you can fill in whose name you would like associated with the information.

All billing information for the donation should be with your name and credit card/bank account information.

Can I write off the donation on my taxes if it’s in someone else’s name?

In short, yes. You can write off charitable donations that were made in someone else’s name as long as you keep the receipts and appropriate information.

Be sure to confirm this advice with your accountant or advisor as your situation might require specific materials.

How to donate to a food charity

How to make a donation in someone else’s name?

When making a donation, most charities will have the option to fill out the information of the person whose name you would like to be associated with the donation.

If the organization doesn’t make this information readily available, give them a call or send them an email. Charities are usually happy to make this change, since you are making a generous donation, after all!

What should the donation letter say?

If you’ve made a donation to your charity of choice, you’ll likely receive a letter that thanks you for the donation. If the website had a place to put in the name of the person you are honoring with your donation, this will likely be included in this letter.

If you don’t receive a letter, you can always write one of your own to give to the honoree of the donation.

Here are some things you might want to include:

  • Information about the charity
  • What the donation will go towards (i.e. a well, feeding children, etc.)
  • If their name is associated with anything besides the money donated (i.e. plaque)
  • How much money was donated, if this is appropriate for the honoree to know

Is making a donation in honor of someone a good gift?

When considering if a donation in honor of someone is a good gift, consider the person’s age. Young children will have a more difficult time grasping the concept of a donation made in their honor, and will likely not appreciate it. If you do want to make a donation for a young kid, consider also purchasing a small toy that’s associated with the charity. For example, if you donate to an animal shelter, consider purchasing a little stuffed animal dog.

However, if the person is more mature and able to understand the beauty of a donation made in their honor, it’s sure to make a great gift! What’s important to consider is what charity the recipient would most like to have their name associated with. Take a few days to investigate what the recipient loves and what would be meaningful to them. Once you know this, you’ll easily be able to find a charity that aligns with their values.

How to donate to a food charity

How can I present the gift of a donation to someone?

Once you’ve narrowed down the favorite charity of the gift recipient and made the donation in their name, it’s now time to think about how you’ll present this gift to your loved one.

You have a few options depending on what came with your donation.

For example, depending on the size of your donation, some organizations might send you a few freebies such as t-shirts or stress balls. You can always wrap these gifts along with the donation letter to give to the recipient.

If the only thing that you received was a donation letter, you can always gift this in a nice envelope. However, if you want to make it a bit more exciting, consider designing your own letter with a free website like Canva. With free and easy to use designs, you’ll be able to design a very eye-pleasing letter to let your recipient know that you’ve donated in their name or honor.

With so many charities in need of help, you may want to consider donating to a charity in someone else’s name.

These kinds of donations make great gifts, especially if you can find a charity that will mean something to the gift recipient.

Keep reading to learn everything you need to know about donating to a charity in someone else’s name.

What does it mean to make a donation in honor of someone?

Donating in honor of someone means that you’re giving to a charity with that person in mind. It does not mean that the donation comes from that person, but that the donor wants the donation to be associated with a certain person.

Often, charities will have the option of choosing whether you want the donation plaque/letter to say “in honor of” or “in memory of”. If it says “in honor of” that usually means that this person is still living. However, “in memory of” likely means that the person has died.

For example, you might use the “in memory of” line if you’re donating to a breast cancer research organization and you want to associate the name of a relative who died of breast cancer with the research center.

Is it legal to make a donation in someone else’s name?

Absolutely! It is perfectly legal to make a donation in someone else’s name.

However, keep in mind that this does not mean that all of the information that you fill out when making a donation will be their information. Most organizations will have a place where you can fill in whose name you would like associated with the information.

All billing information for the donation should be with your name and credit card/bank account information.

Can I write off the donation on my taxes if it’s in someone else’s name?

In short, yes. You can write off charitable donations that were made in someone else’s name as long as you keep the receipts and appropriate information.

Be sure to confirm this advice with your accountant or advisor as your situation might require specific materials.

How to donate to a food charity

How to make a donation in someone else’s name?

When making a donation, most charities will have the option to fill out the information of the person whose name you would like to be associated with the donation.

If the organization doesn’t make this information readily available, give them a call or send them an email. Charities are usually happy to make this change, since you are making a generous donation, after all!

What should the donation letter say?

If you’ve made a donation to your charity of choice, you’ll likely receive a letter that thanks you for the donation. If the website had a place to put in the name of the person you are honoring with your donation, this will likely be included in this letter.

If you don’t receive a letter, you can always write one of your own to give to the honoree of the donation.

Here are some things you might want to include:

  • Information about the charity
  • What the donation will go towards (i.e. a well, feeding children, etc.)
  • If their name is associated with anything besides the money donated (i.e. plaque)
  • How much money was donated, if this is appropriate for the honoree to know

Is making a donation in honor of someone a good gift?

When considering if a donation in honor of someone is a good gift, consider the person’s age. Young children will have a more difficult time grasping the concept of a donation made in their honor, and will likely not appreciate it. If you do want to make a donation for a young kid, consider also purchasing a small toy that’s associated with the charity. For example, if you donate to an animal shelter, consider purchasing a little stuffed animal dog.

However, if the person is more mature and able to understand the beauty of a donation made in their honor, it’s sure to make a great gift! What’s important to consider is what charity the recipient would most like to have their name associated with. Take a few days to investigate what the recipient loves and what would be meaningful to them. Once you know this, you’ll easily be able to find a charity that aligns with their values.

How to donate to a food charity

How can I present the gift of a donation to someone?

Once you’ve narrowed down the favorite charity of the gift recipient and made the donation in their name, it’s now time to think about how you’ll present this gift to your loved one.

You have a few options depending on what came with your donation.

For example, depending on the size of your donation, some organizations might send you a few freebies such as t-shirts or stress balls. You can always wrap these gifts along with the donation letter to give to the recipient.

If the only thing that you received was a donation letter, you can always gift this in a nice envelope. However, if you want to make it a bit more exciting, consider designing your own letter with a free website like Canva. With free and easy to use designs, you’ll be able to design a very eye-pleasing letter to let your recipient know that you’ve donated in their name or honor.

Midwest Food Bank appreciates every donation received – gifts of any size and almost any kind. Contact Jada Hoerr at 309.663.5350 with any questions about these gift opportunities.

IRA Qualified Charitable Distribution

IRA Qualified Charitable Distribution is another giving option that offers charitable benefits to eligible donors. To learn more about this donation opportunity, click here.

Charitable Annuity

Personal Property

Accumulated various assets or items no longer needed can be very valuable for feeding those in need. Gifts of non-cash assets like gift cards, jewelry, phones, tablets, vehicles, boats, precious metals, stocks, or commodities can provide significant financial support for the work of the Midwest Food Bank.

Some of our donors have given non-cash items to MFB. These include cars, stocks, real estate, collectibles, grain, and other items of value. Donors may have items taking up space or may want to eliminate monthly fees on storage units. Non-cash donations represent thousands of dollars. MFB uses an online giving system that allows donors to liquidate almost any kind of quality non-cash donation effortlessly.

How does a donor get started?

2. Click the button that matches the type of non-cash asset you wish to donate.

3. Complete the online form.

4. An email with instructions for transferring the donation will be sent. It will include shipping or pickup coordination information.

As with all donations to Midwest Food Bank, donors can designate the division or program that will receive the non-cash donations. MFB strives for an effortless experience that meets the needs of all donors.

Good stewardship is used with every donation to MFB. More than 99% of every dollar donated is directed to serving those in need.

Midwest Food Bank appreciates every donation received – gifts of any size and almost any kind. Contact Jada Hoerr at 309.663.5350 with any questions about these gift opportunities.

IRA Qualified Charitable Distribution

IRA Qualified Charitable Distribution is another giving option that offers charitable benefits to eligible donors. To learn more about this donation opportunity, click here.

Charitable Annuity

Personal Property

Accumulated various assets or items no longer needed can be very valuable for feeding those in need. Gifts of non-cash assets like gift cards, jewelry, phones, tablets, vehicles, boats, precious metals, stocks, or commodities can provide significant financial support for the work of the Midwest Food Bank.

Some of our donors have given non-cash items to MFB. These include cars, stocks, real estate, collectibles, grain, and other items of value. Donors may have items taking up space or may want to eliminate monthly fees on storage units. Non-cash donations represent thousands of dollars. MFB uses an online giving system that allows donors to liquidate almost any kind of quality non-cash donation effortlessly.

How does a donor get started?

2. Click the button that matches the type of non-cash asset you wish to donate.

3. Complete the online form.

4. An email with instructions for transferring the donation will be sent. It will include shipping or pickup coordination information.

As with all donations to Midwest Food Bank, donors can designate the division or program that will receive the non-cash donations. MFB strives for an effortless experience that meets the needs of all donors.

Good stewardship is used with every donation to MFB. More than 99% of every dollar donated is directed to serving those in need.