How to do a mohawk on ice

How to do a mohawk on ice

How to do a mohawk on ice

Choctaws and Mohawks are figure skating turns. The turns are similar since the skater turns from either forward to backward or backward to forward and changes feet.

The Difference Between a Mohawk and a Choctaw

A Choctaw turn is made from one edge to a different edge, from forward to backward or backward to forward.

Mohawks are done from the same edge to the same edge. There are forward to backward Mohawks, and backward to forward Mohawks.

Choctaws can be entered on an inside edge and exited on an outside edge, or be entered on an outside edge and be exited on an inside edge.

Mohawks are entered on an inside edge and exited on an inside edge or are entered on an outside edge and exited on an outside edge. Inside Mohawks are much easier than outside Mohawks.

Why Are the Turns Named for Native American Tribes?

It does seem strange that the names of two common figure skating turns are also the names of two Native American tribes, but the origin of the figure skating terms “Mohawk” and ” Choctaw” really does come from the American Indians.

During the 1800s, the British people were very interested in the Native Americans and they brought them to England to entertain the elite. The British ice skaters noticed that a certain pose done in Indian war dances looked like a figure skating turn they were doing on the ice, so they named that turn the Mohawk.

A variation of the Mohawk was introduced a bit later and was named Choctaw. Those first Choctaws were done from a forward outside edge to a back inside edge.

Mixing Turns Into Figure-Skating Step Sequences

When a series of turns and steps are put together, figure skaters are doing step sequences. Almost all footwork sequences include Choctaws and Mohawks. Choctaw turns, rather than Mohawk turns, can make footwork more interesting and difficult. A simple Mohawk sequence that most new figure skaters can master is done by doing two Mohawks in a row. If the skater can mix the directions of each Mohawk, a very interesting sequence can be created.

The possibilities are endless when figure skaters put steps and turns together. It’s also fun for skaters to be creative with turns and steps.

The Ten-Step Mohawk Sequence

The ten-step Mohawk sequence is usually done in the counter-clockwise direction and on a circle or curve.

  1. The skater begins on the left foot and does a forward progressive or crossover.
  2. The first three steps are a left forward outside stroke, then a right forward inside crossover or progressive stroke, and then a left forward outside edge.
  3. Next, the skater does a right forward inside Mohawk.
  4. What follows is a short right back outside edge, then a short left back inside edge, followed by a back crossover (left foot over right). ,
  5. Finally, the sequence ends when the skater steps forward to an extended right forward inside glide.

Difference Between Open and Closed Mohawks and Choctaws

When a skater does a closed Choctaw or Mohawk, the free foot is placed behind of the heel of the skate as the skater changes feet. In an open Choctaw or Mohawk, the free foot is placed almost in front of the other skate or near the middle of the instep of a skater’s foot.

Choctaws in Ice Dancing

Some pattern ice dances include both Choctaws and Mohawks. The Choctaw is the highlight of both the Kilian and the Blues. In the Kilian, the skaters do a forward inside to back outside Choctaw at high speed. In the Blues, the skaters do a forward inside to back outside Choctaw. The Choctaw in the Kilian is an open Choctaw, while the Choctaw in the Blues is a closed Choctaw.

The Mohawk turn (some people call it the Eagle turn) is a fairly simple skating maneuver to perfect if you are already comfortable on your edges. One player who seems to use this move quite a bit is Sidney Crosby (when he’s not getting hit in the face with pucks). In order to perform the move the skater simply puts their heels together and points the toes out, this almost aligns the skate blades in-line allowing the player to carve or turn in a circular motion.

How to do the Mohawk Turn

First practice while standing still, you can even practice off the ice. Bend your knees a bit and point one toe out, now lift the other leg and point the other toe out, then step down (heel to heel). With your legs you should be making a “fat diamond” shape.

Now try the same thing on the ice (with skates on). It may be a bit harder because you are on your blades, but work on getting comfortable in that position and balancing.

How to do a mohawk on ice

When doing this move while moving you will be on both inside edges of the skates.

Mohawk Turn Video Lesson

In this video I show you how to do the Mohawk turn, a few drills you can use to get better at doing it, and a few game situations when you might want to use it.

When and Why you need the Mohawk

  • The move allows you to open up and see the entire ice while still moving
  • You can also use it to protect the puck while moving to an area you need to be
  • The move gives you more options while skating, with a push, or turn of a foot you can stop, keep going, or go forwards in a fraction of a second
  • Great to use when coming from behind the net
  • Use it when skating towards the net and calling for a one-timer (on your off wing)
  • Transitioning from skating backwards to going forwards

The Mohawk in Action Sidney Crosby

You can see Crosby using this move a few times in the clip below.

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The Mohawk turn (some people call it the Eagle turn) is a fairly simple skating maneuver to perfect if you are already comfortable on your edges. One player who seems to use this move quite a bit is Sidney Crosby (when he’s not getting hit in the face with pucks). In order to perform the move the skater simply puts their heels together and points the toes out, this almost aligns the skate blades in-line allowing the player to carve or turn in a circular motion.

How to do the Mohawk Turn

First practice while standing still, you can even practice off the ice. Bend your knees a bit and point one toe out, now lift the other leg and point the other toe out, then step down (heel to heel). With your legs you should be making a “fat diamond” shape.

Now try the same thing on the ice (with skates on). It may be a bit harder because you are on your blades, but work on getting comfortable in that position and balancing.

How to do a mohawk on ice

When doing this move while moving you will be on both inside edges of the skates.

Mohawk Turn Video Lesson

In this video I show you how to do the Mohawk turn, a few drills you can use to get better at doing it, and a few game situations when you might want to use it.

When and Why you need the Mohawk

  • The move allows you to open up and see the entire ice while still moving
  • You can also use it to protect the puck while moving to an area you need to be
  • The move gives you more options while skating, with a push, or turn of a foot you can stop, keep going, or go forwards in a fraction of a second
  • Great to use when coming from behind the net
  • Use it when skating towards the net and calling for a one-timer (on your off wing)
  • Transitioning from skating backwards to going forwards

The Mohawk in Action Sidney Crosby

You can see Crosby using this move a few times in the clip below.

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Description

This article is from the Recreational Figure Skating FAQ, by Karen Bryden with numerous contributions by others.

Learning to do graceful mohawks can take years. Here is a list of
things to make the turn easier, explained for forward mohawks:
1. You begin a mohawk with your free skate at your instep turned out
90 degrees, your hips open and your arms and shoulders extended
along the circle. Your head faces the direction of motion.
Practice the entrance until you can sustain it comfortably.
2. Down up down. Start on a deeply bent skating knee. rise up on the
knee to allow the free foot to draw close under your body, and as
you push the skating foot out of the way (by straightening the
knee and pointing your toe so the foot simply slides off the ice),
sink down onto the new skating knee.
3. POINT THE TOE of the free foot, and let the toe of the free foot
touch down (just behind the toepick) first.
4. Don’t think about your heel (or the free foot). It is a common
tendency to think so hard about the placement of the heel of the
free foot against the instep of the skating foot that you place
the heel/back of the free blade on the ice first. Wrong. This will
cause a bad scrape, a near-stop, or a fall, because when you place
the heel/back on the ice first, the skate will not be on an edge.
THINK ABOUT YOUR TOE (and point it).
5. DON’T LOOK DOWN. Getting your free foot in the right place is a
trial, but try to do it by feel. Your head weighs a lot, and if
you look down at where your free foot is, it pulls you off balance
to the inside of the circle.
6. The change of feet is a process, not an instantaneous action. The
free foot touches the ice and is drawn in under the center of
gravity of the body BEFORE the skating foot leaves the ice. It
does not require open hips because your lower body is rotating
through the turn. As the free foot is pulled along (after it first
touches the ice) it is pulled into a backward position. As the
free foot is pulled closer in under the body, more and more of its
blade will be in contact with the ice. BOTH FEET ARE ON THE ICE at
the same time during the turn.
7. The tracing of a mohawk is a shallow curved X (it looks like
crossed swords). This means that the free foot first touches the
ice INSIDE the tracing. It doesn’t touch down ON the tracing. The
skating foot comes off the ice pointed INTO the circle. It slides
off INSIDE the tracing, and doesn’t leave the ice until it has
moved inside the tracing.
8. Try to NOT move anything in your upper body. You check the turn by
facing into the circle, with your arms extended along the tracing
before, during, and after the turn. Your hips swivel, and your
legs change UNDERNEATH the upper body.
9. The skating foot is slid off the ice by pointing the toe toward
the inside of the circle and straightening the knee, so that at
the conclusion of the mohawk, the new free leg is straight and
extended (though not in a dance-closed mohawk which begins open
(free foot to instep) and ends with the feet side-by-side and
touching.

Although having a good hip/leg turnout will make learning mohawks
easier, especially open mohawks, it is possible to to mohawks with
only about 90 degrees turnout; make sure that you keep you free
shoulder pressing back before and through the turn.

Description

This article is from the Recreational Figure Skating FAQ, by Karen Bryden with numerous contributions by others.

A mohawk is either open or closed, depending on the position of the
free skate just before the turn. For an open mohawk, the heel of the
free foot is placed on the ice at the inner side of the skating foot.
For a closed mohawk, the free foot is placed on the ice behind the
heel of the skating foot.

Although people with closed hips often have an easier time with the
closed (i.e. step-behind) mohawks than with the open ones (i.e. free
foot at instep), the terms “open” and “close” have nothing to do with
the position of the hips before or after the turn. Originally, the
terms related to the trace on the ice: On a mohawk done with the feet
close together close to 90 degrees the traces left by the starting and
the finishing foot cross in an “x” shaped, i.e., the arc described by
the skater is “closed”. On a change of feet with feet apart turned out
close to 180 degrees the traces do not cross and the arc is “open”.
This turn was known as an open mohawk. Later on, the name mohawk
became applied only to the kind where the traces cross (the formerly
open mohawk is nowadays usually referred to as a “step from forwards
to backwards” or “step from backwards to forwards”) and the terms
“open” and “close” adquired their current meaning given above.

There are other variations of the basic mohawks, used mainly in the
context of ice dancing. They are often based on the position of the
free leg after the turn. These variations are often named after a
dance where they are executed (for example, the “Fiesta tango mohawk”
or the “Foxtrot mohawk”).

In order to be a great skater you need good balance. New hockey players are usually off balance, bow-legged, stutter stepping and some look like they just finished riding a horse for 6 hours. Why do new hockey players look so out of place on the ice? Because they don’t have good edge control. Learning how to control your edges will help you a lot with balance, control, and a smoother stride. Edge drills will help players from beginner right up to pro players continue to improve and feel comfortable in their skates. In fact in one of the videos below Sidney Crosby begins his practice with edge drills.

If you are a true beginner you may want to practice some balance drills (the next video I will be uploading) but don’t be afraid to try out these edge work drills as well. The only way you will get better is if you keep challenging yourself.

If you are an experienced player these drills can also challenge you.

  • Do them first correctly
  • Next correctly and with more power
  • Next correctly with power and speed
  • Now correctly with power, speed and a puck

By using this progression you can continue to use the same drills, and the same routine and continue to improve as a player.

Get to Know Your Edges – With 6 Edgework Drills

Edges 101

Each skate has two edges, an inside edge and an outside edge. See the picture below for a better idea.

How to do a mohawk on iceHow to use your edges

When you are accelerating you want to use your inside edges. You will be leaning slightly forward, with your feet turned and your skates on an angle to the ice. You want to really dig your blades in with each stride, bite those edges into the ice and go!

How to do a mohawk on iceWhen you are turning you will be using an inside edge, and an outside edge (depending on which way you turn). If you are new you might not trust your edges and keep a very wide stance while turning. You need to trust your edges and let them grip into the ice while you make sharp turns.

When you are stopping you are also using one inside edge and one outside edge, you achieve this by bending your knees, getting lower and having your skates at an angle. In this case you don’t want your weight right over your feet though as that will cause your edges to dig in, you want to “slide” a bit on your edges.

When you are gliding you are not really using either edge. They will both be in contact with the ice, but you will be gliding on the hollow between the edges. If you are gliding with a wide stance it can slow you down because your inside edges will be digging too much into the ice.

Pro’s Use Edgework Drills

In the videos below you can see Crosby using the inside edge drill that I describe in the video above.
21 seconds in Crosby warms up with the inside edge drills

5 seconds in Crosby is doing the inside edge drill, notice how he stays nice and low

Here is another video of Crosby using the mohawk drill that I show in my video on how to do the Mohawk turn. This drill uses the inside edges. Crosby is pretty good so he uses a puck at the same time.

Why should you work on your edges?

How to do a mohawk on iceIn my opinion edge work drills are the best way for hockey players to push their limits and become more comfortable in their skates. A good hockey player will feel just as comfortable in their hockey skates as they do with running shoes on.

I really like drills that force players to balance on one leg because it teaches them how to balance their weight over their skates and pushes them outside their comfort zone. Now once they are using both legs they will be feel a lot more comfortable and be able to perform the task much better. Also, during a hockey game players will need to balance on one leg very briefly over and over, every stride, crossover, or pivot requires brief one leg balance. With balance comes power and control

  • Edge control will help you with speed, balance and agility
  • Good edge control will help you get more scoring chances
  • Good edge control will help you with turning, stopping, and shaking defenders
  • Good edge control will make you more like Crosby and less like Mackinnon (in the video below)

Want more skating tips?

We have a full series on skating called the fundamentals of skating. Visit this link if you want to learn to skate, or become a better skater.

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Online Mohawk Dictionary
We just made a dictionary

Comprehensive Mohawk-English Dictionary

it is, thatdeterminer Context: Takó:s né:’e[cat] [it is]“It’s a cat” Né:’e tewakatonhwentsyó:ni[it is] [dualic-it-me-want/need-stative]“That’s what I want” Né:’e í:kehre[it is] [I-it-think/want]“That’s what I think” Yah tewakateryèn:tare nahò:ten né:’e[not] [not-it-me-know-stative] [what] [it is]“I do not know what it is” particle

né:’e tsi

becausecomplementizer, conjunction Context: Yakó:ta’s né:’e tsi teyakohwishenheyòn:ne[it-she-sleep-stative] [because] [dual-it-she-energy-to.die.-past.stative]“She is asleep because she was tired/fatigued” Yah tehakkaryà:khse né:’e tsi sótsi ró:tenht[not] [not-he-me-debt-break-benefactive] [because] [too] [it-he-poor-stative]“He did not pay me because he is too poor” Yah thiyewaké:non né:’e tsi sótsi í:non[not] [not-translocative-it-me-to.go-perfective] [because] [too] [far]“I did not go there because it is too far” particle

ahse’kén

because Examples: Yakó:ta’s ahse’kén teyakohwishenheyòn:ne[it-she-sleep-stative] [because] [dual-it-she-energy-to.die.-past.stative]“She is asleep because she was tired/fatigued” Yah tehakkaryà:khse ahse’kén sótsi ró:tenht[not] [not-he-me-debt-break-benefactive] [because] [too] [it-he-poor-stative]“He did not pay me because he is too poor” Yah thiyewaké:non ahse’kén sótsi í:non[not] [not-translocative-it-me-to.go-perfective] [because] [too] [far]“I did not go there because it is too far” Part of speech: particleFunction: complementizer, conjunction

that, in which, the one that, the one whichcomplementizer, conjunction, joiner Context: Ónhka thí:ken né:ne yehnén:yehs?(who) (that-determiner) né:ne (she-it-tall-stative)“who is that the one that’s tall?” Tewakatonhwentsyó:ni ne katshe’towá:nen né:ne ehtà:ke káhere(I-it-want/need-stative) ne (it-it-bottle/jar/can-large-stative) né:ne (below/down) (it-it-set.up-stative)“I want the big jar the one that’s sitting on the bottom (shelf)” Rake’níha wahanahskwahní:non ne kítkit, né:ne konni’nhnónhsayens(he-me-father) (definite.past-he-it-domestic.animal-purchase) …. Read More

thatcomplementizer, conjunction, joiner Context: Wa’onkhró:ri tsi teyakohwishenhé:yon(definite-she-me-to.tell) (that) (it-she-energy-to.die-stative)“she told me that she is tired/fatigued” É:so tsi wakatshennón:ni(alot) (that) (it-me-aim-to.make)I am really happy Í:kehre tsi enwá:ton(I-it-think/want-stative) (that) (future-it-it-to.become)“I think that it would be possible” particle

the, a, to, fornominal marker and complementizer. Context: Yakonkwe’tí:yo ne sa’nisténha(she-it-human-nice) NE (she-you-mother)“Your mother is A nice lady” Wa’khní:non ne à:there(past-I-it-bought) NE (it-basket)“I bought A basket” Ne takó:s é:so tsi yóre’senNE (cat) (alot) (that) (it-it-fat-stative)THE cat is really fat Teyonatonhwentsyó:ni ne aontakontiráhthen(theyF-it-want/need) NE (indefinite-cislocative-theyF-climb)“They (f) want TO climb up here” Teyakotonhwentsyó:ni ne aonkyaneráhsten(she-it-want/need) NE (indefinite-it-me-good-causative-benefactive)“She …. Read More

-wennarha’tsher-

Kawennárha (c-stem)computer, laptop, tablet composed of:-wenn- word/language/voice/syllable; -ar- to picture/join/include/incorporate; -ha- habitual; -tsher- nominalyzer contrived noun

-ya’tarha’tsher-

Tkaya’tárha / Tkaia’tarha (c-stem)television, screen, TV composed of:-ya’t- body; -ar- to picture/join/include/incorporate; -ha- habitual; -tsher- nominalyzer contrived noun

Last Updated: May 10, 2021 References

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The axel is sometimes the hardest jump for figure skaters to learn. This jump features at least 1.5 spins in midair, which make it more difficult to land than some other jumps. There is also the double axel with 2.5 spins and the triple axel with 3.5 spins. No one has ever successfully landed a quadruple axel in a competition before, but maybe you will be the first! Learn the proper stance and execution of an axel, and practice it often along with other strength and stability moves to build your skills.

How to do a mohawk on ice

How to do a mohawk on ice

How to do a mohawk on ice

How to do a mohawk on ice

Tip: Proper body alignment is crucial for successfully executing an axel. Practice your stance until it feels like second nature. This will help to ensure that you maintain the correct stance during your axels.