How to cut railroad ties

A fugitive from Michigan

Arborist site guardian
  • 23 December 2015
  • #
  • Okay, due to some renovations, I now have a monstrous pile of rotten, more or less intact railway sleepers or something similar. Most appear to be about 8-9 feet wide and are covered in a tar-like substance that hasn’t fought rot so well. There are all kinds of nails, rebar, etc … I could use a dozen of them for some yard of dais, the rest, hell, if I know.

    He’ll probably have to drag them to someone’s landfill because they were in town and couldn’t light the village fire with creasote-weighted wood.

    zoggeroooooo

    The strange tree
    • 23 December 2015
  • #
  • PULLINmyPOULAN

    Arborist site guardian
    • 23 December 2015
  • #
  • PULLINmyPOULAN

    Arborist site guardian
    • 23 December 2015
  • #
  • PULLINmyPOULAN

    Arborist site guardian
    • 23 December 2015
  • # 5
  • How to cut railroad ties

    PULLINmyPOULAN

    Arborist site guardian
    • 23 December 2015
  • #
  • How to cut railroad ties

    PULLINmyPOULAN

    Arborist site guardian
    • 23 December 2015
  • #
  • zoggeroooooo

    The strange tree
    • 23 December 2015
  • # 8
  • hupte

    Arborist Guru website
    • 23 December 2015
  • #
  • Patrick 62

    Employed by ArboristSite
    • 23 December 2015
  • # 0
  • You cook me for this.

    I smoked them. We had several, we cut them, divided them and burned them in a furnace to which a tube with a double heat exchanger was attached. A 500 cfm fan blew air around about 6 feet of the oven stack and was directed to a more suitable place to heat the trailer. The system was semi-safe as I literally lit the fireplace once a week and burned the clean pipe. It roared like a vacuum cleaner for about 4 minutes! I know the heated air came out of the thing at 400 degrees because the control relay dropped once when the solder (she) melted.

    Don’t try this. Your stove is not designed to literally burn creosote per kilogram.

    cutting them was another problem. full of sand and gravel. The chainsaw will be boring in a minute. I attached a short bar to the 1/2 HP washer motor and filed the rake very low. Cut like Mutha. and the chain speed was so low that the link was less of a problem.

    I sing

    Employed by ArboristSite
    • 23 December 2015
  • #
  • zoggeroooooo

    The strange tree
    • 23 December 2015
  • #
  • You cook me for this.

    I smoked them. We had several, we cut them, divided them and burned them in a furnace to which a tube with a double heat exchanger was attached. A 500 cfm fan blew air around about 6 feet of the oven stack and was directed to a more suitable place to heat the trailer. The system was semi-safe as I literally lit the fireplace once a week and burned the clean pipe. It roared like a vacuum cleaner for about 4 minutes! I know the heated air came out of the thing at 400 degrees because the control relay dropped once when the solder (she) melted.

    Don’t try this. Your stove is not designed to literally burn creosote per kilogram.

    cutting them was another problem. full of sand and gravel. The chainsaw will be boring in a minute. I attached a short bar to the 1/2 HP washer motor and filed the rake very low. Cut like Mutha. and the chain speed was so low that the link was less of a problem.

    How to cut railroad ties

    It will be a rather complicated, if not completely impossible, process. It is possible to remove creosote from rail links, but the risks and work associated with it can outweigh the results.

    How to remove creosote from railway sleepers?

    An old used railway sleeper treated with creosote will be deeply penetrated by the toxic substance, sandblasting would be a method to try, but the indicator is the depth of creosote penetration into the wood.

    Even through sandblasting, you are exposed to fine sawdust, contaminated by the well-known toxic substance of creosote, known to be carcinogenic.

    Another way to remove creosote from railway sleepers would be to seal the wood. Now I know this isn’t really removing the creosote, but sealing it can help reduce the chances of it getting into the soil.

    Is there an easier way to remove creosote from rail links?

    A third option would be available if you have a bandsaw. You can cut all 6 walls of the rail to a few inches or as much as necessary to remove the creosote-impregnated wood. This way you will get a thinner and smaller crossbar.

    Not all of the options listed above are guaranteed to remove creosote successfully, the substance may have drawn very deep into the tie, making removal impossible.

    How to cut railroad ties

    One of the truly stunning improvements anyone can make to their sloping landscape is the railroad retaining wall. This type of wall has huge character with wide railway sleepers, discoloration, grooves, and even history. Once the ground has been prepared, the process of building the rail link retaining wall is very simple. However, this is laborious and time-consuming. Paying attention to the process is very important to make sure the wall stays up for years to come. Here are some of the mistakes to avoid when installing a retaining wall.

    Not maintaining the ground level

    The most important part of the whole process of building a retaining wall is to have a flat work surface. Many people are in a hurry and are in a hurry to complete the wall. They do not spend time leveling the ground on which the ties will be laid. Spend more time using the punch and level to make sure the substrate is even and solid.

    Failure to maintain obligations alternatively

    Working with railway sleepers means that you will need to cut them to different lengths to arrange them as you further build the wall. This alternating layering will add a lot of strength to the wall as each seam between the bonds is connected rather than simply placed on top of each other.

    No use of ties

    When building a retaining wall of any material and especially with railway sleepers, you need to have some kind of connection between the wall and the ground it holds. For railway sleepers, you should use a 4-foot tie that goes straight up the slope and also rests against the wall itself. This will add extra strength to the wall, using the power of the slope to hold it in place.

    Failure to use constraint reinforcement

    Some people don’t realize that rebar needs to be used in a wooden retaining wall in the same way it should be used for a mortar wall. The reinforcement works in the wall itself to give it extra strength. You will need to spend some time drilling a few pieces of stringers and inserting the armature into the hole.

    Not using the water barrier

    The plastic felt that goes under the first rows of railway sleepers and the back of the wall should be used to keep water out of the wood. Even if treated, sitting in a pool of water will eat for a long time during the treatment. Protect the wood with a water barrier.

    No stones or pipes are used for drainage

    Before you start laying the rail links, you should also install the water drain that runs down the slope. It should be stones or a drainpipe or both. This can be directly under the railway sleepers or a few inches underground where the sleepers will be placed.

    Hadley PA

    Arborist site guardian
    • 25 September 2012
  • #
  • singletrack100

    Arborist site guardian
    • 25 September 2012
  • #
  • broken budget

    Employed by ArboristSite
    • 25 September 2012
  • #
  • sleep

    Member of the Arborist site
    • 25 September 2012
  • #
  • hrhunter

    Arborist site guardian
    • 25 September 2012
  • # 5
  • I agree to look for nails or spikes, but also ballast (stone) stuck in the bruises.

    Steve H

    Arborist Guru website
    • 25 September 2012
  • #
  • I’ve done this several times. I use an old cane and an old chain. You’ll have to put up with the smell of old creosote. The shavings from the cuttings lay on the ground and smelled for days. I also wore work clothes, which I then threw in the machine to suppress the odor, and they too caught the smell of creosote.

    Still it was worth it. I was building a retaining wall and had to cut the tie a bit, which saved me a lot of time. I don’t recommend breathing dust if you do, as it can’t be good for your lungs.

    Maybe you’ll have to clean up the chains later, get the goo out. It depends on how heavy the creosote is in the cut ties. Sometimes I had to clean them and other times I didn’t have to. Depends.

    A fugitive from Michigan

    Arborist site guardian
    • 23 December 2015
  • #
  • Okay, due to some renovations, I now have a monstrous pile of rotten, more or less intact railway sleepers or something similar. Most appear to be about 8-9 feet wide and are covered in a tar-like substance that hasn’t fought rot so well. There are all kinds of nails, rebar, etc … I could use a dozen of them for some yard of dais, the rest, hell, if I know.

    He’ll probably have to drag them to someone’s landfill because they were in town and couldn’t light the village fire with creasote-weighted wood.

    zoggeroooooo

    The strange tree
    • 23 December 2015
  • #
  • PULLINmyPOULAN

    Arborist site guardian
    • 23 December 2015
  • #
  • PULLINmyPOULAN

    Arborist site guardian
    • 23 December 2015
  • #
  • PULLINmyPOULAN

    Arborist site guardian
    • 23 December 2015
  • # 5
  • How to cut railroad ties

    PULLINmyPOULAN

    Arborist site guardian
    • 23 December 2015
  • #
  • How to cut railroad ties

    PULLINmyPOULAN

    Arborist site guardian
    • 23 December 2015
  • #
  • zoggeroooooo

    The strange tree
    • 23 December 2015
  • # 8
  • hupte

    Arborist Guru website
    • 23 December 2015
  • #
  • Patrick 62

    Employed by ArboristSite
    • 23 December 2015
  • # 0
  • You cook me for this.

    I smoked them. We had several, we cut them, divided them and burned them in a furnace to which a tube with a double heat exchanger was attached. A 500 cfm fan blew air around about 6 feet of the oven stack and was directed to a more suitable place to heat the trailer. The system was semi-safe as I literally lit the fireplace once a week and burned the clean pipe. It roared like a vacuum cleaner for about 4 minutes! I know the heated air came out of the thing at 400 degrees because the control relay dropped once when the solder (she) melted.

    Don’t try this. Your stove is not designed to literally burn creosote per kilogram.

    cutting them was another problem. full of sand and gravel. The chainsaw will be boring in a minute. I attached a short bar to the 1/2 HP washer motor and filed the rake very low. Cut like Mutha. and the chain speed was so low that the link was less of a problem.

    I sing

    Employed by ArboristSite
    • 23 December 2015
  • #
  • zoggeroooooo

    The strange tree
    • 23 December 2015
  • #
  • You cook me for this.

    I smoked them. We had several, we cut them, divided them and burned them in a furnace to which a tube with a double heat exchanger was attached. A 500 cfm fan blew air around about 6 feet of the oven stack and was directed to a more suitable place to heat the trailer. The system was semi-safe as I literally lit the fireplace once a week and burned the clean pipe. It roared like a vacuum cleaner for about 4 minutes! I know the heated air came out of the thing at 400 degrees because the control relay dropped once when the solder (she) melted.

    Don’t try this. Your stove is not designed to literally burn creosote per kilogram.

    cutting them was another problem. full of sand and gravel. The chainsaw will be boring in a minute. I attached a short bar to the 1/2 HP washer motor and filed the rake very low. Cut like Mutha. and the chain speed was so low that the link was less of a problem.

    Wholesale processed and pressure treated railway sleepers

    The straps are sold by weight, or about 250 pieces

    Bridgewell is one of the largest wholesale suppliers of new and used railway sleepers in the United States. Our customers are Class I railways, short lines, municipalities and contractors. Our product line includes the new AREMA grade as well as industrial grade cross tie rods, switch tie rods, relay tie rods, road crossings and bridge beams. We offer custom cutting and processing of our lumber and lumber.

    Wholesale processed and pressure treated railway sleepers

    The straps are sold by weight, or about 250 pieces

    Bridgewell is one of the largest wholesale suppliers of new and used railway sleepers in the United States. Our customers are Class I railways, short lines, municipalities and contractors. Our product line includes the new AREMA grade as well as industrial grade cross tie rods, switch tie rods, relay tie rods, road crossings and bridge beams. We offer custom cutting and processing of our lumber and lumber.

    New rail links

    A unique selection with a choice of wholesale options, ready for delivery. Choose treated or untreated.

    Use railway sleepers

    Fantastic wholesale selection for farmers, growers, landscape architects, contractors and lumber yards.

    Wooden railway bridges

    For construction or maintenance, choose transformed or untreated.

    putter

    Arborist site guardian
    • January 14, 2004
  • #
  • Dirty troll

    Arborist site guardian
    • January 14, 2004
  • #
  • Ricksvar

    Arborist site guardian
    • January 14, 2004
  • #
  • A half chisel chain would probably be better than a full chisel in this work. If you hit metal (chances are you are against you), it probably won’t do much damage to the blades compared to a solid chisel. I also think a half chisel is better for dirty cuts but never cuts rail links.

    guardian 1

    Arborist Guru website
    • January 14, 2004
  • #
  • putter

    Arborist site guardian
    • January 14, 2004
  • # 5
  • tons of characters

    Employed by ArboristSite
    • January 14, 2004
  • #
  • lucky

    Arborist Guru website
    • January 14, 2004
  • #
  • guardian 1

    Arborist Guru website
    • January 14, 2004
  • # 8
  • putter

    Arborist site guardian
    • January 14, 2004
  • #
  • Unfortunately, I won’t have much to do with ties. My colleague uses them as fence posts. They are already in the ground and need to be cut in height. Let’s hope that time will wash them off the dirt. When it comes to wooden things, I don’t think I have much of a choice.

    I hope I haven’t opened Pandora’s box

    tons of characters

    Employed by ArboristSite
    • January 14, 2004
  • # 0
  • Scott

    Employed by ArboristSite
    • January 14, 2004
  • #
  • lucky

    Arborist Guru website
    • January 14, 2004
  • #
  • ArboristSite Lurker
    • January 14, 2004
  • #
  • Jakub J.

    The strange tree
    • January 14, 2004
  • #
  • WoodTick007

    Employed by ArboristSite
    • January 14, 2004
  • # 5
  • It will go with the lead paint chips I ate as a kid.

    Master Blaster

    Tree house for the elderly
    • January 14, 2004
  • #
  • How to cut railroad ties

    Lewis Brander

    Employed by ArboristSite
    • January 14, 2004
  • #
  • Cutting of railway ties:

    Colleagues exchanged a lot of advice. The only thing I’d like to add is that I think I’d cut the oil into a bar with some diesel or kerosene to prevent the creosote from building up and sticking to the saw blade. JMO. The grapple.

    G account

    Employed by ArboristSite
    • January 14, 2004
  • # 8
  • A few points to add fuel to the fire.

    It is true that I am not an expert on rail connections, but it took me a long time. I’ve never seen much more than 8 feet. I’m sure there are some longer ones, but I think most are 8 feet. You said you were cutting the fence posts. I see no reason to cut them unless a guy puts them in my too lazy to dig a real hole. At worst, you’d be 48 inches above the ground and 48 inches above the ground. In the case of linear bars, we can skimp and put 42 on the bottom and 54 on the top. There is no reason to cut the pole below 48 inches. I prefer 9-10 foot poles, so ties generally don’t work with the exception of line poles. Ideally, put 60 “below and 60” on top. at the end and it should be easily visible. I have never trimmed the top of the tie, but I would wonder if the crescent pierced the head fiber a great distance. If you cut the top off it exposes the fresh head fiber to the weather .

    I have some railway sleepers left from the retaining wall I built and I would like to turn them into benches. Instead of sitting on the old tar-covered exterior, although I’d rather cut it up a bit, like in this fantastically drawn image:

    How to cut railroad ties

    This is a profile view, so you look at it from the side. Basically, I would like to leave about 6 inches of full height on each side and then cut a curve about two inches high so that the seat part is 6 inches thick.

    How do I make this cut and what tools will I need?

    Pamiętaj, że tarcica ma wymiary 8 "x 8" x 10 ‘, więc wstawienie jej na stół warsztatowy nie wchodzi w rachubę.

    How to cut railroad ties

    How to cut railroad ties

    4 replies 4

    I don’t know how “cute” it must be when finished, but you can easily make rough cuts with a chainsaw or jigsaw with a fairly long blade. A quick search shows 10-inch blades that may be enough for a jigsaw. For example, a 12-inch gardening blade like this Amazon bad boy.

    How to cut railroad ties

    It may not be the best example, but as long as your esophagus is deep enough (it should be).ShouldOpera.

    Wedge the sides until there is enough room to guide the tool through the 6 inch area.

    They must bereally careful with a chainsaw. A very dangerous tool. Mostly because of the posture you may need to make this cut.

    If you had a huge old fashioned handsaw to rip your tie off I guess it would work just as well as you can see in this blog

    How to cut railroad ties

    It would also be nice to hit from the side with a wide ax. In the same way that raw logs are formed in wood. You can also cut vertically several times with a saw (hand or motorized) along the entire length of the seat and knock out the debris with a large wooden or slippery chisel.

    How to cut railroad ties

    Creosote

    As I said in my comment, these ties are commonly treated with creosote, which is a known skin irritant among other health problems like chemical burns. While you can avoid exposure by sealing it, I’ll mention it anyway because there is a risk when tie processing also (sawdust and what not.). Even if no one is sitting on it. La tua pelle e i tuoi polmoni non valgono la pena.