How to cure the common cold naturally

As the virus has swept the US in recent months, people have turned to some strange habits to keep illness at bay, like chugging orange juice, “starving” their fevers, and taking antibiotics. (Spoiler: None of these will help.)

Orange juice is high in sugar and there’s little to no evidence that the vitamin C it contains helps beat viruses. Depriving yourself of nutrients while you’re sick may also backfire; your weakened immune system needs nutrients to fight off illness. And antibiotics kill bacteria, not viruses — which characterize both the flu and the common cold .

Instead, there are several research-backed steps you can take to fight off illness.

Keep in mind, too, that the symptoms of the flu and the common cold can be very similar, but these preventive and defensive tips should help in most cases.

Gargle with plain water.

If you’re just starting to feel a cold coming on, try gargling with plain water. A study of close to 400 healthy volunteers published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that those who gargled with plain water were significantly less likely to come down with upper-respiratory-tract infections (URTIs) — a type of infection often linked with colds and the flu — during the study period. The researchers concluded that “simple water gargling was effective to prevent URTIs among healthy people.”

Have some chicken soup.

Strangely enough, several recent studies have suggested that chicken soup may actually reduce the symptoms of a cold. The jury’s still out on precisely why this old-school remedy appears to help, but the available evidence suggests that some component of the soup helps calm down the inflammation that triggers many cold symptoms.

For a study published in the journal Chest, the official publication of the American College of Chest Physicians, researchers found that chicken soup appeared to slow the movement of neutrophils, the white blood cells that are the hallmark of acute infection. In an attempt to decipher precisely which part of the soup was beneficial, they also tested some of the components individually, and concluded that both the vegetables and the chicken appeared to have “inhibitory activity.”

Get plenty of rest.

Getting enough sleep — somewhere between seven and nine hours a night — is key to a properly functioning immune system, which plays a critical role in both helping fight off an existing cold and defending you against a new one.

For a 2009 study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers tracked the sleep habits of 153 healthy men and women for two weeks to get a sense of their sleep patterns. Then, they gave them nasal drops containing rhinovirus, also known as the common cold, and monitored them for five more days.

Volunteers who regularly got less than seven hours of sleep were nearly three times more likely to come down with the cold than those who slept eight hours or more each night.

Try a zinc supplement or lozenge.

Unlike vitamin C, which studies have found likely does nothing to prevent or treat the common cold, zinc may actually be worth a shot this season. The mineral seems to interfere with the replication of rhinoviruses, the bugs that cause the common cold.

In a 2011 review of studies of people who’d recently gotten sick, researchers looked at those who’d started taking zinc and compared them with those who just took a placebo. The ones on zinc had shorter colds and less severe symptoms.

Zinc is a trace element that the cells of our immune system rely on to function. Not getting enough zinc (Harvard Medical School researchers recommend 15-25 mg of zinc per day) can affect the functioning of our T-cells and other immune cells. But it’s also important not to get too much: an excess of the supplement may actually interfere with the immune system’s functioning and have the opposite of the intended result.

For aches and pains, acetaminophen (Tylenol) or (Advil) may help.

Over-the-counter pain medications like Advil and Tylenol can help with the aches and pains that often accompany colds and the flu. The research on which one provides superior relief for viruses is inconclusive, however.

A 2013 study published in the British Medical Journal that looked at close to 1,000 people with upper-respiratory infections (not colds) suggested that Tylenol provided stronger relief, but it’s important to keep in mind that because Advil is an anti-inflammatory, it may be better for soothing swollen glands.

Use honey to soothe a cough.

If you hate the taste of cough syrup, you’re in luck: The WHO actually recommends honey as a cough medication for children. A 2012 Pediatrics study of 300 children who’d been sick for a week or less found that those who were given 10 grams of honey at bedtime had fewer cough symptoms (compared with those who were given a placebo). Oddly enough, the kids given honey also slept more soundly.

How to cure the common cold naturally

Though there is, of course, no cure for the common cold, there are many ways to improve symptoms and hasten the healing process. Often, the best remedy for a cold is the simplest. That means getting plenty of rest and drinking lots of fluids. Being viruses, colds do not respond to antibiotics, so it is best to just endure the cold for the duration, while trying to improve symptoms as much as possible. Most colds last between one and two weeks.

Before trying to find the best remedy for a cold, it is a good idea to try to prevent a cold in the first place. Frequent hand washing, keeping the hands away from the nose and face, using paper towels for hand washing, getting enough sleep, and quitting smoking are all ways to prevent the common cold. If someone is sick at home, wash surfaces and door handles frequently, and use disposable cups.

A common remedy for a cold is chicken soup. According to the Mayo Clinic, research has shown that chicken soup is actually beneficial, because it is an anti-inflammatory and also helps to relieve congestion. In addition, it is very important to stay hydrated when trying to treat the common cold. Decaffeinated tea, water, and orange juice are good beverages to drink during a cold. Mixing a little honey and lemon in the tea can also help relieve the pain of a sore throat.

Dry air tends to make one more likely to catch a cold and for symptoms to persist, so adding moisture to the air with a humidifier can often help to relieve cold symptoms. When using a humidifier, it is extremely important to keep the humidifier clean to prevent the growth of bacteria. Some humidifiers now allow the use of menthol vapor therapy products to be added to the mist. Again, always carefully follow the directions on the humidifier.

In addition, do not discount over-the-counter cold medicines as a good remedy for a cold. Though they may not shorten the duration of the cold, they can relieve symptoms temporarily. However, in most cases it is best not to use the medicine for more than a few days, and doctors now believe that it is best not to suppress a low-grade fever in adults, as the higher body temperature can actually help the body fight off the cold infection. Follow all directions on the packages carefully, and never mix cold medicines.

Gargling with some warm salt water can help relieve pain from a sore throat. Non-medicated saline nasal sprays are also helpful in relieving congestion, and they are safe for children to use as well. Some people believe that herbal supplements can help to significantly lessen the duration of a cold. These include ginseng, echinacea, ginger, honey, and zinc lozenges, among others. In addition, vitamin C supplements are also often taken as a remedy for a cold. Finally, it is most important to take it easy, get enough rest, and stay warm.

When infected by a cough, cold or the flu, our airways trigger the cells of the immune system to help fight inflammation caused by symptoms. By reducing inflammation in the cells of our airways, the symptoms of sore throat and cough are relieved. With no cure in sight, over-the-counter treatments can at best bring symptom relief or shorten the duration of those symptoms. Or you can take the natural approach. WebMD explores some home remedies that may help you feel better along the way.

No. 1: Blow Your Nose Often — and the Right Way

It’s important to blow your nose regularly when you have a cold rather than sniffling mucus back into your head. But when you blow hard, pressure can cause an earache. The best way to blow your nose: Press a finger over one nostril while you blow gently to clear the other . Wash your hands after blowing your nose.

No. 2: Stay Rested

Resting when you first come down with a cold or the flu helps your body direct its energy toward the immune battle. This battle taxes the body. So give it a little help by lying down under a blanket.

No. 3: Gargle

Gargling can moisten a sore throat and bring temporary relief. Try a teaspoon of salt dissolved in warm water, four times daily. To reduce the tickle in your throat, try an astringent gargle — such as tea that contains tannin — to tighten the membranes. Or, steep one tablespoon of lemon juice in two cups of hot water and mix in one teaspoon of honey. Let the mixture cool to room temperature before gargling. Honey should never be given to children under age 1.

No. 4: Drink Hot Liquids

Warm liquids help relieve nasal congestion, help prevent dehydration, and some tea leaves, like chamomile, help soothe the uncomfortably inflamed membranes that line your nose and throat. You could also add some honey which soothes the airways and has both antiviral and antibacterial properties.

No.5: Try a Lozenge to Soothe Your Throat

Look for lozenges that contain Echinacea or elderberry extract, zinc, and vitamin C. Aloe helps soothe and reduce irritation of the nose and throat. For treating colds, mint teas are often used; mint oils and peppermint oil-mostly made of menthol- can be used as rubs. Hanging eucalyptus to showers helps release its oils to reduce inflammation in the airways. Some over the counter lozenges also contain very low doses of aspirin which, when applied to inflamed tissues caused by an upper respiratory infection, can help soothe a sore throat.

No. 6: Take a Steamy Shower

Steamy showers moisturize your nasal passages and relax you. If you’re dizzy from the flu, run a steamy shower while you sit on a chair nearby and take a sponge bath.

No. 7: Apply Hot or Cold Packs Around Your Congested Sinuses

Either temperature may help you feel more comfortable. You can buy reusable hot or cold packs at a drugstore. Or make your own. Take a damp washcloth and heat it for 20 seconds at a time in a microwave (test the temperature first to make sure it’s not too hot). Or take a small bag of frozen peas to use as a cold pack.

No. 8: Sleep With an Extra Pillow Under Your Head

This will help with the drainage of nasal passages. If the angle is too awkward, try placing the pillows between the mattress and the box springs to create a more gradual slope.

No. 9: Don’t Fly Unless Necessary

There’s no point adding stress to your already stressed-out upper respiratory system, and that’s what the change in air pressure will do. Flying with cold or flu congestion can hurt your eardrums as a result of pressure changes during takeoff and landing. If you must fly, ask your doctor about using a decongestant and carry a nasal spray with you to use just before takeoff and landing. Chewing gum and swallowing frequently can also help relieve pressure.

Remember, serious conditions can masquerade as the common cold and a mild infection can evolve into something more serious. If you have severe symptoms or are feeling sicker with each passing day or must travel, see a doctor.

Sources

SOURCES: Centers for Disease Control: ”Symptom Relief.” American Academy of Family Physicians: ”Colds and the Flu.” Charles B. Inlander, author, 77 Ways to Beat Cold and Flu.

Looking for a natural or alternative treatment for your cold or flu symptoms? Here are tips that may help relieve your symptoms.

#1 Know When not to Treat Symptoms

Believe it or not, those annoying symptoms you’re experiencing are part of the natural healing process — evidence that the immune system is battling illness. For instance, a fever is your body’s way of trying to kill viruses by creating a hotter-than-normal environment. Also, a fever’s hot environment makes germ-killing proteins in your blood circulate more quickly and effectively. Thus, if you endure a moderate fever for a day or two, you may actually get well faster. Coughing is another productive symptom; it clears your breathing passages of thick mucus that can carry germs to your lungs and the rest of your body. Even that stuffy nose is best treated mildly or not at all. A decongestant, like Sudafed, restricts flow to the blood vessels in your nose and throat. But often you want the increase blood flow because it warms the infected area and helps secretions carry germs out of your body.

#2 Blow Your Nose Often (and the Right Way)

It’s important to blow your nose regularly when you have a cold rather than sniffling mucus back into your head. But when you blow hard, pressure can carry germ-carrying phlegm back into your ear passages, causing earache. The best way to blow your nose: Press a finger over one nostril while you blow gently to clear the other.

#3 Treat That Stuffy Nose With Warm Salt Water

Salt-water rinsing helps break nasal congestion, while also removing virus particles and bacteria from your nose. Here’s a popular recipe:

Mix 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon baking soda in 8 ounces of warm water. Use a bulb syringe or nasal irrigation kit to squirt water into the nose. Hold one nostril closed by applying light finger pressure while squirting the salt mixture into the other nostril. Let it drain. Repeat two to three times, then treat the other nostril.

#4 Stay Warm and Rested

Staying warm and resting when you first come down with a cold or the flu helps your body direct its energy toward the immune battle. This battle taxes the body. So give it a little help by resting.

#5 Gargle

Gargling can moisten a sore throat and bring temporary relief. Gargle with half a teaspoon of salt dissolved in 8 ounces warm water, four times daily.

To reduce the tickle in your throat, try an astringent gargle — such as tea that contains tannin — to tighten the membranes. Or use a thick, viscous gargle made with honey or honey and apple cider vinegar. Seep one tablespoon of raspberry leaves or lemon juice in two cups of hot water; mix with one teaspoon of honey. Let the mixture cool to room temperature before gargling.

#6 Drink Hot Liquids

Hot liquids relieve nasal congestion, prevent dehydration, and soothe the uncomfortably inflamed membranes that line your nose and throat. If you’re so congested that you can’t sleep at night, try a hot toddy, an age-old remedy. Make a cup of hot herbal tea. Add one teaspoon of honey and one small shot (about 1 ounce) of whiskey or bourbon. Limit yourself to one. Too much alcohol will inflame the membranes and make you feel worse.

#7 Take a Steamy Shower

Steamy showers moisturize your nasal passages and may help you relax. If you’re dizzy from the flu, run a steamy shower while you sit on a chair nearby and take a sponge bath.

#8 Use a Salve Under Your Nose

A small dab of mentholated salve under your nose can help to open breathing passages and restore the irritated skin at the base of the nose. Menthol, eucalyptus, and camphor all have mild numbing ingredients that may help relieve the pain of a nose rubbed raw. However, only put it on the outside, under your nose, not inside your nose.

#9 Apply Hot or Cold Packs Around Your Congested Sinuses

Either temperature works. You can buy reusable hot or cold packs at a drugstore or make your own. You can apply heat by taking a damp washcloth and heating it for 55 seconds in a microwave (test the temperature first to make sure it’s not too hot.) A small bag of frozen peas works well as a cold pack.

#10 Sleep With an Extra Pillow Under Your Head

Elevating your head will help relieve congested nasal passages. If the angle is too awkward, try placing the pillows between the mattress and the box springs to create a more gradual slope.

#11 Don’t Fly Unless Necessary

There’s no point adding stress to your already stressed-out upper respiratory system, and that’s what the change in air pressure will do. Flying with cold or flu congestion can temporarily damage your eardrums as a result of pressure changes during takeoff and landing. If you must fly, use a decongestant and carry a nasal spray with you to use just before takeoff and landing. Chewing gum and swallowing frequently can also help relieve pressure.

#12 Eat Infection-Fighting Foods

Here are some good foods to eat when you’re battling a cold or flu:

  • Bananas and rice to soothe an upset stomach and curb diarrhea -containing foods like bell peppers
  • Blueberries curb diarrhea and are high in natural aspirin, which may lower fevers and help with aches and pains
  • Carrots, which contain beta-carotene
  • Chili peppers may open sinuses, and help break up mucus in the lungs
  • Cranberries may help prevent bacteria from sticking to cells lining the bladder and urinary tract
  • Mustard or horseradish may helps break up mucus in air passages
  • Onions contain phytochemicals purported to help the body clear bronchitis and other infections
  • Black and green tea contain catechin, a phytochemical purported to have natural antibiotic and anti-diarrhea effects

Remember, serious conditions, such as sinus infections, bronchitis, meningitis, strep throat, and asthma, can look like the common cold. If you have severe symptoms, or don’t seem to be getting better, call your doctor.

Sources

SOURCE:
Charles B. Inlander, president of The People’s Medical Society, a nonprofit consumer health advocacy organization, and author of 77 Ways to Beat Cold and Flu.

Don’t let that nasty cold get the best of you. Take charge with simple do-it-yourself treatments that clear up your stuffy nose and soothe your scratchy throat.

No. 1: Drink Up!

Get plenty of fluids. It helps break up your congestion, makes your throat moist, and keeps you from getting dehydrated.

Need ideas for something to drink? Try water, sports drinks, herbal teas, fruit drinks, or ginger ale. Your mother’s chicken soup might help, too!

No. 2: Make It Steamy!

You can loosen up your stuffy nose if you breathe in some steam. Hold your head over a pot of boiling water and breathe slowly through your nose. But be careful. Don’t let the heat burn your nose.

You can also get some relief with a humidifier in your bedroom. Also try to take in some moisture from a hot shower with the door closed.

No. 3: Blow Your Nose

It’s better than sniffling mucus back into your head. But make sure you do it the right way. If you blow hard, you’ll send germ-carrying phlegm back into your ear passages, which can lead to an earache.

The best technique? Press a finger over one nostril while you blow gently to clear the other.

No. 4: Use Saline Spray or Salt-Water Rinse

Both can help break up the congestion in your nose. If you go the rinsing route, try this recipe:

  • Mix 3 teaspoons of iodide-free salt and 1 teaspoon baking soda.
  • Place in an airtight container.
  • Add 1 teaspoon of this mixture to 8 ounces of lukewarm boiled or distilled water.

Next, fill a bulb syringe with this solution (or use a Neti pot.) Lean your head over a basin and gently squirt the salt water into your nose. Hold one nostril closed by applying light finger pressure while squirting the mixture into the other nostril. Let it drain. Then treat the other nostril.

Always use distilled, sterile, or previous boiled water when you make this solution. Otherwise you might get an infection. Also, rinse the bulb or Neti pot after each use and leave open to air dry.

Continued

No. 5: Stay Warm and Rested

It’s especially important to get rest when you first come down with a cold or the flu. It helps your body direct its energy to fighting off your infection. This battle taxes your body. So give it a little help by lying down under a blanket to stay warm if necessary.

No. 6: Gargle With Warm Salt Water

It moistens your sore or scratchy throat and brings temporary relief. Try a half teaspoon of salt dissolved in 8 ounces of warm water four times a day.

To calm the tickle in your throat, try a gargle made from tea. Or use one that’s got honey in it.

No. 7: Drink Hot Liquids

They relieve your congestion and soothe the inflamed lining of your nose and throat.

If you’re so congested you can’t sleep at night, try a hot toddy, an age-old remedy. Here’s how:

  • Make a cup of hot herbal tea.
  • Add 1 teaspoon of honey and one small shot (about 1 ounce) of whiskey or bourbon if you wish (adults only!).

Limit yourself to one, though. Too much alcohol inflames the membranes in your nose and throat.

No. 8: Use Mentholated Salve

Try a small dab under your nose. It opens up breathing passages.

Menthol, eucalyptus, and camphor all have mild numbing ingredients that may help relieve the pain of a nose rubbed raw.

No. 9: Put Hot Packs on Your Sinuses

You can buy reusable ones at a drugstore. Or make your own. Take a damp washcloth and heat it for 30 seconds in a microwave. Test the temperature first to make sure it’s right for you.

No. 10: Try an Extra Pillow Under Your Head

Do this at night when you sleep to help relieve congested nasal passages. If the angle is too awkward, place the pillows between the mattress and the box springs to create a more gradual slope.

Ah, yes, the dreaded common cold. While not as severe as the flu, coming down with a cold can make basic day-to-day activities more challenging. The sneezing, stuffy nose, and sore throat are never fun to deal with.

So, what can you do to ease some of the pain? Here are 6 natural cold remedies to consider.

1. Practice prevention

One of the best ways to manage a cold is to avoid getting sick in the first place. Easier said than done, right? While it’s impossible to avoid ever catching a cold, there are a few things you can do to minimize your risk, like:

  • Protect your immune system by staying healthy. Exercise regularly. Eat healthy foods — especially dark green leafy vegetables. And take good care of your mental health.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water.
  • Avoid touching your face. Cold viruses can live on your hands for up to 24 hours and they can enter your body through your nose, mouth, and eyes.
  • Stay away from people who are sick.

2. Stay hydrated

Proper hydration can help your body fight infection. To ensure you’re staying hydrated, try to:

  • Drink lots of fluids. This can include water, decaffeinated tea, juice (but skip anything with too much sugar), and soup.
  • Avoid beverages that dehydrate you — like sodas, alcohol, or coffee.
  • Set yourself reminders to drink water.
  • Fill up a water bottle in the morning and make sure to sip it throughout the day.

3. Get some good rest

Fighting an illness can take a toll on your body. Giving your body the rest it needs can help your immune system fight off the cold virus. Here are a few ways to let your body naturally heal itself:

  • Put the smartphone down. Give your brain a break by setting the device aside.
  • Take a nap.
  • Read a lighthearted book.
  • Listen to a guided meditation.
  • Watch a heartwarming movie.

4. Ease your sore throat

A sore throat can be a constant irritation when you have a cold. Fortunately, there are several things you can do to soothe it. You can:

  • Make your own honey, lemon, and ginger cough drops. There are several recipes available online — find one that works for you.
  • Sip warm tea with honey and lemon.
  • Gargle with warm saltwater.
  • Drink warm, clear broth.
  • Enjoy a cold treat like a fresh fruit ice pop.

5. Reduce congestion

When mucus builds up in your nasal passages and lungs, it causes congestion and a general feeling of stuffiness. Most congestion from a cold will clear up on its own over time, but you can sometimes reduce it if you:

  • Use a cool mist vaporizer.
  • Run a hot, steamy shower.
  • Try a sinus rinse with saline solution.
  • Place a warm compress on your face.
  • Prop up your head with pillows before bed. This may allow some of your congestion to drain from your nose while you sleep.

6. Spice up your food

When your body is building defenses against a cold virus, inflammation can occur. Try adding some spices to your food to potentially reduce inflammation* — while giving your meal an extra kick of flavor:

  • Add some turmeric, ginger, and garlic to soup.
  • Sprinkle some cinnamon and clove in decaf tea.
  • Use a dash of cayenne pepper in a dish to help temporarily clear a stuffy nose.

When to see a doctor

The old saying is true: There’s no cure for the common cold, so keep in mind that the above remedies are meant to help treat the symptoms, not the infection. The only thing that will truly make colds go away is time, and they typically last 1 to 2 weeks.

However, if you still aren’t better after a week or 2, start to feel worse, or develop serious symptoms — which can include persistent high fever, shortness of breath, or extreme weakness and lightheadedness — seek medical attention right away.

How to cure the common cold naturally

The common cold is a viral infection of the nose and upper respiratory tract. Even though it’s usually harmless, it can cause discomfort in the form of a runny nose, sore throat, fever and body aches.

Most people recover fully from the common cold after a few days. But taking natural remedies can help reduce the duration and severity of the viral infection.

1. Elderberry

Elderberries are the fruits of the elderberry shrub. They’re rich in antioxidants known as anthocyanins. Thanks to these antioxidants, as well as the fruits’ natural antiviral properties, elderberries can help treat colds, the flu, hay fever and sinus infections.

If taken every two to four hours at the onset of cold symptoms, elderberry can shorten the duration of a cold by one to four days.

Elderberry can also reduce swelling and pain because of its anti-inflammatory properties.

There are several elderberry supplement options and preparations on the market, such as capsules, teas, juices and syrups.

2. Ginger

Ginger is a leafy plant whose roots or rhizomes are used as a spice or healing aid. Depending on the variety, the inside of the root may be yellow, red or white. Ginger is known for its pungent odor and mildly spicy flavor.

In addition to its ability to add flavor to food, ginger also has antiviral properties that assist the body in healing. It’s also safe for pregnant or nursing women, unlike conventional medicines. Additionally, ginger can relieve sore throat, headaches and fever.

Ginger is available fresh, dried and powdered. Fresh ginger slices can be steeped to make a soothing cup of tea, while powdered ginger can be stirred into honey for relieving cough and sore throat.

3. Slippery elm

Slippery elm is a tree native to the central and eastern United States. The tree is known for its slimy inner bark, which Native Americans used to treat fever and sore throat.

Mixing slippery elm bark with water creates a sticky substance called mucilage, which coats and soothes a sore throat. Slippery elm is also great for coughs and symptoms caused by other respiratory conditions, such as asthma and bronchitis. (Related: Investigating the efficacy of honey for treating bronchial asthma.)

4. Marshmallow root

Marshmallow root comes from the marshmallow plant, a flowering plant native to Europe and certain parts of Asia and Africa. In folk medicine, marshmallow root is used to relieve coughs and sore throat. The root’s soothing effects come from the mucilage that is produced when the root is combined with water.

5. Peppermint

Peppermint is a natural decongestant and fever reducer because of a compound called menthol. Menthol gives peppermint its characteristic minty flavor and odor. To relieve congestion, sip peppermint tea. You can also add a few drops of peppermint essential oil to a diffuser. Run the diffuser and inhale slowly through your nose.

Herb-infused honey for the common cold

Try this herb-infused honey to quickly relieve symptoms of the common cold.

Ingredients:

  • Fresh or dried herbs
  • Raw honey
  • Filtered water

Directions:

  1. Fill a glass jar with fresh or dried herbs.
  2. Pour simmering water over the herbs. Secure the lid and steep until the water cools. Strain.
  3. Heat the tea over low heat until warm.
  4. Remove from heat and add 2 cups of raw honey for every one cup of tea. Stir to combine.
  5. Pour into a sterile jar and store in the refrigerator.

Notes:

  • If treating a sore throat, add 2 tablespoons of ginger and 1 teaspoon of cayenne pepper to the mixture.
  • If boosting immunity, add 1/2 tablespoon each of garlic, cinnamon and echinacea to the mixture.
  • If promoting relaxation, use 2 tablespoons each of chamomile, lemon balm and lavender to make the tea.
  • Children under the age of one shouldn’t be fed raw honey.

The common cold can be easily prevented and treated by using safe, natural remedies.

Stay healthy naturally with Mother Nature’s cure for a cold.

With winter season drawing upon us, it’s not unusual for a dose of the common cold to attack. During this time, it becomes more important than ever to fuel our bodies with vitamins and minerals to boost the immune system .

Rather than stocking up on prescribed medicine, explore what our earth has to offer first. Nourish yourself back to health and heal your body with mother nature’s natural remedies. Take a look at these 4 easy, home-made recipes to say goodbye to that nasty cold and hello to good health.

Immune Boosting Buddha Bowl

Have fun creating your own colorful, highly nutritious Buddha Bowl packed with superfoods to give your immune system all the wonderful vitamins and minerals it needs. Combining a mixture of leafy greens, whole grains, and protein topped with a citrus dressing provides the perfect recipe to fight your flu.

Spinach and kale are wholesome superfoods loaded with vitamin C and E to protect you against viral infections. By adding a mixture of Quinoa and Edamame you can enjoy a plant-based source of protein and antioxidants. Finish off your bowl with a drizzle of citrus dressing, as well all know how mighty Vitamin C can be at fighting viral infections. Try out this healing Buddha Bowl recipe to prevent and relieve your symptoms.

(Nick Lundengran / Shutterstock.com)

Flu Fighting Soup

A warming blend of coconut milk, seasonal vegetables, and healing spices such as paprika, chili, and cayenne pepper is exactly what the doctor ordered when you feel a little under the weather. These tasty, antibacterial ingredients encourage the release of any blockages in your nasal passage. By adding garlic and ginger , you can enjoy anti-inflammatory benefits, opening up your airways and allowing you to breathe freely again. Have a go at this healing homemade spicy soup by Dale Pinnocks as a quick cure for a cold.

Cold Busting Smoothies

Smoothies provide the perfect way to pack all of your favorite natural ingredients into one meal. You can blend a variety of healthy fruits and nutrient-rich vegetables to fuel your mind, body, and soul. Top tip for those who don’t enjoy spinach: all the other good-tasting ingredients such as berries and coconut water will overpower the flavor so pack a small handful in there for those nutrient-rich vitamins.

Choose from an on-the-go bottle or get more creative with a home-made smoothie bowl. Cold curing ingredients include Apple Cider Vinegar, elderberry syrup, and any source of citrus. Add your favorite toppings for extra nutrition. Crushed almonds or raw coconut shavings works a treat! Wave goodbye to your cold with this delicious smoothie bowl recipe .

(marcin jucha / Shutterstock.com)

Golden Milk Chai

Fight your flu the Ayurvedic way with this soothing blend of turmeric, milk, cinnamon, and ginger. Also known as ‘Golden Milk’, this warm infused remedy can do wonders for your cold symptoms.

The Sanskrit word for turmeric is Kanchani, meaning the “Golden Goddess”. This traditional Indian ingredient has been used for centuries for its powerful healing properties. Ayurveda strongly believes in this magical ingredient as a natural healer. We all know how comforting a big mug of tea can be when you’re not feeling so great. So if you are suffering from a nasty flu, give this quick and easy chai recipe a go to fight off infection and boost immunity.