How to crochet a triangle

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How to crochet and easy single crochet triangle

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YARN Cotton yarn

ABBREVIATIONS

Sc: single crochet

sl st: slip stitch

WRITTEN PATTERN

ch2, sc in the 2nd ch from the hook, turn.

Row 1 :Ch1, 2sc in the st.

Row 2 :Ch1,sc in the first st, 2sc in the next st.

Row 3 :Ch1, sc in the 1st st, sc in the next st, 2 sc in the last st.

Row4: Ch1, sc in the 1st st, sc in the next 2 st, 2sc in the last st

Row5: ch1, sc in the 1st , sc in every st, 2 sc in the last st.

Repeat row 5 till you obtain the width you want.

Triangles are a quick and easy shape to crochet, so we’re going to show you how to crochet a triangle in two different ways!

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How to crochet a triangle

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Published: August 27, 2020 at 4:10 pm

Whether you fancy making some quick bunting or are planning on hooking up an angular patchwork blanket, understanding how to crochet a triangle is a fun introduction to the world of crochet geometry.

If you’re new to crochet, you may find our post on how to increase in crochet stitches a useful companion to this post.

Crocheting triangles is actually surprisingly easy, as unlike many other shapes where you would need to work in the round, triangles can be made in rows with simple increase stitches. In this tutorial we’re going to focus on making an equilateral triangle (where all 3 angles are the same), as these are the easiest and perhaps most useful type of triangles.

Crochet triangles are generally made by doing an increase stitch (working two stitches into one stitch) at the end of alternate rows. It’s worth noting that if you try increasing stitches at both ends of your row, you’ll end up with a much wider triangular shape that will normally start curving the bottom edge – hence these are not commonly used.

How to crochet a triangle

So grab a hook and some yarn, and lets get started!

Posted on Last updated: March 3, 2020 Categories Crochet Patterns, Shapes

| Home | Crochet Patterns | Shapes | How to Crochet Triangles in Spiral Rounds

How to crochet a triangle

There are many different ways on how to crochet triangles, this pattern will explain you how to crochet a triangle in spiral rounds. With the base shape of a triangle you can easily create 3-dimensional shapes as the tetrahedron or triangular boxes and blocks.

Crochet triangles can be used as cloths, table runner, blankets, kerchief, pottholders, coasters and easy ponchos made out of two triangles. For Amigurumi they can be used as ears, scales, horns, hands, feet and many more elements.

The depicted Crochet Triangle have been crocheted with the “Schachenmayr Catania” yarn with a 2.5 mm crochet hook.

Triangle Crochet Pattern

Needed Techniques

  • Magic Ring
  • Single Crochet (sc)
  • Increase

Needed Materials and Tools

  • 2.5 mm Crochet Hook
  • Stitch Marker
  • Colors: blue
  • This pattern was crocheted using the „Schachenmayr Catania“ yarn (100% Cotton, Meterage: 125 m, Yarn Ball Weight: 50 g, Yarn Weight: Sport – 5ply / Fine (2)) in the following colors:
  • Cloud (Wolke (247))

All materials used are available on Amazon (Affiliate Link):

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How to crochet a triangle

How to crochet a triangle

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How to crochet a triangle

Crochet Triangle

The triangle is crocheted in Cloud in spiral rounds with single crochet stitches.

How to crochet a triangle

Use the check boxes to mark your finished rounds, rows and steps.

  • Crochet the triangle in spiral rounds in Cloud.
  • Round 1: 3 sc into the Magic Ring (3 stitches).
  • Round 2: [4 sc into the next stitch stitch] repeat till end of round (12 stitches).
  • Round 3: 2 sc, [4 sc into next stitch, 3 sc] repeat 2 times, 4 sc into next stitch, 1 sc (21 stitches).
  • Round 4: 4 sc, [4 sc into next stitch, 6 sc] repeat 2 times, 4 sc into next stitch, 2 sc (30 stitches).
  • Round 5: 6 sc, [4 sc into next stitch, 9 sc] repeat 2 times, 4 sc into next stitch, 3 sc (39 stitches).
  • Round 6: 8 sc, [4 sc into next stitch, 12 sc] repeat 2 times, 4 sc into next stitch, 4 sc (48 stitches).
  • Round 7: 10 sc, [4 SC into next stitch, 15 sc] repeat 2 times, 4 sc into next stitch, 5 sc (57 stitches).

Done is your crochet triangle. Continue crocheting additional rounds with the same formula for a bigger triangle. Each round must have an increase by 9 stitches.

Here the next rounds for a larger triangle:

  • Round 8: 12 sc [4 sc into next stitch, 18 sc] repeat 2 times, 4 sc into next stitch, 6 sc (66 stitches).
  • Round 9: 14 sc, [4 sc into next stitch, 21 sc] repeat 2 times, 4 sc into next stitch, 7 sc (75 stitches).
  • Round 10: 16 sc, [4 sc into next stitch, 24 sc] repeat 2 times, 4 sc into next stitch, 8 sc (84 stitches).
  • Round 11: 18 sc, [4 sc into next stitch, 27 sc] repeat 2 times, 4 sc into next stitch, 9 sc (93 stitches).
  • Round 12: 20 sc, [4 sc into next stitch, 30 sc] repeat 2 times, 4 sc into next stitch, 10 sc (102 stitches).
  • Round 13: 22 sc, [4 sc into next stitch, 33 sc] repeat 2 times, 4 sc into next stitch, 11 sc (111 stitches).
  • Round 14: 24 sc, [4 sc into next stitch, 36 sc] repeat 2 times, 4 sc into next stitch, 12 sc (120 stitches).
  • Round 15: 26 sc, [4 sc into next stitch, 39 sc] repeat 2 times, 4 sc into next stitch, 13 sc (129 stitches).

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Crochet a bobble stitch triangle

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So this pattern is a little different than the video in terms on how to close each row, as it is more accurate to follow in order to get the perfect triangle.

The pdf pattern will be the same as this so you can recreate the triangle easily

Written Pattern

Row 1:Ch4, 4 incomplete dc in the 3rd ch from the hook, join all together to form the bobble, sc in the last ch.

Row 2: ch1, 2sc in the first st, 2sc in the last st.

Row3: Ch1, bobble in the 1st st, SC in the next st, bobble in the next st, sl st in the last st.

Row 4: ch1, 2sc in the 1st st as ch1, 1 sc in every st, 2 sc in the last st.

Row 5: ch 1, bobble in the same st, sc in the next st, bobble in the next st, sc in the next, bobble in the next, sc in the next, sl st in the last st.

Row 6: Repeat row 4

Row 7: Repeat row 5

in every single crochet row, you are going to start with 2 sc and finish the row with 2 sc.

in every bobble st row, you are going to increase the bobbles number by 1, till you get the width you like of your triangle

A Collection of Crochet Triangle Free Patterns. Crochet Triangle Motifs can be easy, and quick for earrings, edgings, garlands, and add edging into grannies. They can also be joined into blankets, and more. Today our Crochet Channel is going to share some designs of crochet triangles for you to stitch out into your next project. The list below includes puff triangle, Celtic triangle, African flower triangle and class solid and granny stitch triangles, scroll down and see what project you will create out of them. We would love to invite you to join our Pinterest Group for the latest and be sure to follow our Crochet and Knit Page, too.

01. Solid Triangles

How to crochet a triangle

A solid triangles in this easy tutorial suitable for beginners. Image and Free Pattern: Lullaby Lodge

02. Crochet Celtic Triangle

How to crochet a triangle

Image and Free Pattern [with Video]: Happy Berry Crochet

03. Easy SC Triangle

How to crochet a triangle

Image and Free Pattern: Spin Cushions

04. 6 petal African Flower Triangle

How to crochet a triangle

This is a cute flower triangle motif that can be used for bunting, blankets, bags, etc. They are quick to work up and don’t use very much yarn and would make a great stash buster project. Image and Free Pattern: Nicole Hancock on Ravelry

05. 60-Degree Triangle

How to crochet a triangle

Image and Free Pattern: I am A Mess, Video: Yay For Yarn

Help support free patterns – click to share!

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New to crochet and looking for a beginner crochet triangle shawl? Try this one skein pattern using only basic stitches and chains…

Design Story and Inspiration for This One Skein Shawl

I wanted to create a shawl that used only one skein of cake yarn, easy enough for a beginner with basic crochet skills – that looked pretty enough to wear just about anywhere.

So I started with some basic crochet stitches: a double crochet, chain 1 pattern and loved it so much I just kept working row after row of the same pattern, until I was almost out of yarn, then I worked a border with chains, single crochet and slip stitches. I love the way it turned out!

Yarn Options for this Easy Crochet Shawl

For my shawl, I chose Lion Brand Mandala, and I love the way the colors change in this yarn. It is a DK weight yarn (#3) and comes in a huge variety of colors. It has a lot of yardage in the cake, which is another reason I chose it for a shawl.

You can substitute any cake yarn for this project, just be sure to adjust your hook size if you choose to make it with a different weight yarn, such as worsted weight yarn or aran. Check the recommendation on the ball band if you aren’t sure which hook size to use.

Commonly Asked Questions about Triangle Shawls

Triangle shawls are either worked from the point up, or they can be worked from the center down to the point. It depends upon the stitch pattern and the designer’s choice. This patter is worked from the center down, and then the border is worked along the edges.

There are many ways to wear a crochet triangle shawl, and really no wrong way. You can drape it over your shoulders, wear it like a triangle scarf around your neck, pin it in place on one shoulder, or even fold it to look more like a shrug or cardigan. The choices are endless.

The beauty of shawls is that there are many stitches that lend themselves well to shawls. I’ve even seen the shell stitch and a bobble pattern in a shawl design that were just stunning. Moss stitch is another great stitch for a beautiful shawl that is easy enough for a beginner.

This design uses mostly double crochet and chains, and the more delicate border is chains, single crochet and slip stitches.

Before we begin… let’s get Social!

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Free Crochet Shawl Pattern Details

This shawl is begun in the center back and works outward. It is very simple and the yarn does all the color changing for you!

You can make a tassel for each point if you like.

How to Customize Your Triangle Shawl Crochet Pattern

This pattern is SO easy to customize! Want it larger? Just keep repeating the same row. Smaller? Work less rows.

You can also make it in any weight yarn you like – even fingering weight yarn if you like! Just make sure to adjust your crochet hook size, like I mentioned above. Of course, this type of change would require you to work more repeat rows, but the basic design would be the same.

More Free Crochet Shawl Patterns…

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Join the library and get access to subscriber exclusive downloadable patterns, printables and more – just like this one!!

Beginner Crochet Triangle Shawl

What You’ll Need

Yarn: Lion Brand Mandala, 1 skein Sphinx (DK weight #3)
Crochet Hook: US H (5.00mm)
Notions: Yarn needle, scissors
Gauge: 20 sts and 10 rows = 4″ (10cm) in dc, ch-1 pattern
Finished Size: Approximately 24″ x 48″

Stitch Descriptions and Abbreviations:
Chain (ch)
Slip Stitch (sl st)
Single Crochet (sc)
Double Crochet (dc)

Pattern Notes:
Ch 3 counts as dc at beginning of row.
Ch 4 counts as dc, ch-1 at beginning of row.

Video Tutorial for this Simple Triangle Shawl

Check out this video tutorial for help and don’t forget to subscribe to my YouTube Channel for weekly video tutorials!

Easy Crochet Triangle Shawl Pattern

Row 1: Work 4 dc in 4th ch from hook; turn (5 sts).

Row 2: Ch 3, 2 dc in first st, dc in next st, (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in next st, dc in next st, 3 dc in last st; turn (13 sts).

Row 3: Ch 4, dc in same st, *ch 1, skip next dc, dc in next dc; repeat to ch-1 space of previous row, ch 1, work (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in ch-1 space, repeat from * to last st, ch 1, dc in last st; turn.

Row 4: Ch 4, dc in same st, *ch 1, skip next st, dc in dc; repeat to ch-1 of top shell (center of dc, ch 1 dc of previous row), ch 1, (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in ch-1 space; repeat from * to last st, ch 1, dc in last st; turn.

Rows 5-48 (or desired width): Repeat row 4.

Border

Row 1: Ch 1, sc in first st, *ch 3, skip next st, sc in next st; repeat from * to end; turn.

Row 2: Slip st to center of first ch-3 space; *ch 3, sl st in 3rd ch from hook, sl st in center ch of next ch-3 space; repeat from * to end.

Finishing

Weave in ends.
Block if desired.

More Free Crochet Shawl Patterns You Might Like…

Today we learned how to crochet an easy one skein crochet shawl that is easy enough for a beginner! I hope you’ve enjoyed this free crochet pattern – and you can always view all of my free crochet patterns here!

How to crochet a triangle

chapter 5: The Ultimate Guide to Crochet in the Round

Principles of Crochet Triangles

Welcome to Chapter 5 of The Ultimate Guide to Crochet in the Round! In this chapter you’ll learn about the fundamentals of crochet triangles, specifically those that are worked in the round.

Crochet triangles may not be the most popular of shapes when it comes to project creation but they’re more useful than you might think. Whether you plan to use them as filler shapes in your motif blanket or you need a carrot nose for your amigurumi snowman, learning the principles of crochet triangles is worth your while. Hopefully you’ve already read through Chapter 4, where we talked about squares. The good news is triangles are a whole lot like squares, with one less corner, of course.

The first round of most triangles follow the same general pattern.

You can start the first round of a triangle with a chain loop as you learned in Chapter 1 or magic ring as you learned in Chapter 2. The choice is completely up to you.

Three sides with three stitches and three corners with two chains is the perfect first round recipe for crochet triangles. It’s what you’ll see for most patterns, especially those here at B.Hooked.

Like the square, each round of a triangle will usually begin and end in a corner. You may encounter a pattern where the join occurs within one of the sides but it’s less common because the join is a little more obvious.

What about the turning chain?

Even though you never turn the triangle when crocheting in the round, the turning chain is very important. It matches the height of the other stitches in the round making it necessary for a tidy-looking triangle.

When you crochet a triangle in the traditional way (where the join occurs in one of the three corners), the turning chain can either be the first stitch or the last stitch. There’s no right or wrong way here. It all comes down to preference.

Here’s how a pattern might look when the foundation chain is the first stitch:

Round 1: Ch 3 and join with a slst to the first ch. Ch 3. 2 dc in center of ring. Ch 2. [3 dc, ch 2] two times in center of ring. Join with a slst to 3rd ch.

Aleternatively, here’s how a pattern might look when the foundation chain is the last stitch:

Round 1: Ch 3 and join with a slst to the first ch. Ch 5 (counts as dc and ch 2). [3 dc, ch 2] two times in center of ring. 2 more dc in center of ring and join with slst to 3rd ch.

Pay close attention to the bottom left corner on each triangle. That’s the joining corner. The holes of the join corner where the turning chain is the first stitch is slightly larger than the other two corners. The difference is pretty subtle but we think it looks a little neater when the turning chain is the last stitch. Again, no right or wrong way. You can decide which option you like best.

  • How to crochet a triangleTurning chain is first stitch
  • How to crochet a triangleTurning chain is last stitch

When the turning chain is the last stitch of the round it must also include two corner chains.

  • 2 turning chains for half double crochets
  • 3 turning chains for double crochets
  • 4 turning chains for treble crochets

We add the two corner chains so it becomes…

  • 4 turning chains for half double crochets (2 = a stitch, 2 = corner chain)
  • 5 turning chains for double crochets (3 = a stitch, 2 = corner chain)
  • 6 turning chains for treble crochets (4 = a stitch, 2 = corner chain)

Whether the turning chain is the first or last stitch, the join happens in the same place…

In the turning chain.

Now, which turning chain is determined by the stitch. A triangle made of half double crochets will join in the second chain. A triangle made of double crochet stitches will join in the third chain and so on.

Remember if the turning chain is the last stitch, the remaining two chains are corner chains.

Speaking of corners, they need to be worked a specific way too.

The basic formula for a crochet triangle corner is this…

2 stitches, chain 2, 2 stitches (all worked in the same chain two space)

Any basic stitch can be used from single crochet to double treble crochet and everything in between and beyond. This formula increases the triangle uniformly so it will continue to get bigger with each round and, more importantly, lay flat.

This creates a predictable increase in stitch count every round.

With every new round, the stitch count will increase by twelve stitches.

In other words, the four stitches in each of the three corners are essential for a crochet triangle to continue to get bigger and remain flat.

What if your triangle doesn’t lay flat?

There is one main cause for a triangle to curl upward – there’s an issue with the increases (and it usually happens in the corners).

Increasing by 12 stitches (four stitches each corner) every round creates a flat triangle that continues to get bigger with every round. Anything less and the triangle will curl upward. Anything more and the edges will look wavy.

What if your triangle looks rounded, especially in the corners?

Don’t worry, you aren’t doing anything wrong. Corners made up of two chains generally look rounded and it’s more pronounced the sharper the corner is supposed to look.

The best way to make your triangle look pointy as a triangle should be, is to block it.

Blocking is a finishing technique that’ll improve the shape of all sorts of projects and it’s especially useful for crocheted motifs like triangles, squares and hexagons. The process is pretty simple. Pin the work down in the exact shape you want, spray it with water (saturating it completely) and allow it to dry completely before removing the pins.

A single pin in each corner and a few along the sides is enough to get the job done. It’s the best way to perfect the shape of your triangle.

What’s next?

We learn best by doing and there’s no better way than completing a project you can actually use and enjoy. Try your hand at crochet triangles with our barefoot sandals pattern here. It’s a quick little project you can wear around the house or with your flip flops.

When you’re ready, in Chapter 6 we’ll look at the fundamentals of one last basic shape, the hexagon.

I am excited to share a new color work stitch pattern with you today! This stitch uses post stitches and color work to create a neat effect. Be sure to read more to find my inspiration, special features, and of course how to crochet the Triangle Post Stitch!

All right, so let’s learn a bit about how this stitch came about! I first came up with a variation of this stitch when I was swatching for a design for the I Like Crochet magazine! You may remember I recently had a pattern published in their magazine—the Timberlane Cardigan! Well, this stitch uses the same technique as that cardigan does; I just made the triangles smaller!

Overall, I love making this stitch because of how much the triangles POP! The post stitches help create this effect, but two contrasting colors help accentuate the effect. I think this stitch would look awesome in a ton of different color combinations!

How to crochet a triangle

If you make this stitch, I would love to see YOUR color combination! Be sure to post pictures and tag me @desertblossomcrafts on Instagram, or post the pictures in my Facebook group!

Want to get rid of the ads? This stitch pattern is available as apart of a PDF bundle with 3 OTHER stitch patterns—all my October stitches! From this PDF, you can easily print out the patterns, or view it without ads.

How to crochet a triangle

Also, in case you haven’t heard…this stitch is apart of the Desert Blossom Stitch Along, which is running throughout all of 2019! We are more than halfway through the year, but you can still jump in now if you’d like to! Be sure to view the master list of stitches released so far HERE, or join the community in my Facebook Group HERE.

Like I was saying earlier, I absolutely LOVE it when you guys make the stitches and share pictures! Please, please, please, share if you’ve made one of them! You can post in the Facebook group, or tag me on Instagram.

How to Crochet the Triangle Post Stitch

All right, let’s get started on this stitch pattern!

  • To Pin this Tutorial to your Pinterest Boards, click HERE
  • To get the PDF version of this pattern (+3 bonus stitch patterns!) click HERE
  • To pre-order the ENTIRE Desert Blossom Stitch Dictionary, clickHERE

Notes:

  • Stitch Pattern is a multiple of 7+4
  • Ch 3 at beginning of rows counts as dc
  • Carry both colors throughout the whole square. Whenever you change colors, do so on the stitch BEFORE you need the new color. Simply finish the previous dc by doing the last yarn over with the new color. (Make sure to watch the video for more help with the color changes).

MATERIALS:

You can potentially use ANY yarn and hook for this stitch. However, here’s what I used:

  1. Worsted Weight yarn (I used Sugarbush Bold yarn, but you can use any worsted weight!)
  2. H/8 (5mm) crochet hook

Instructions:

NOTE: For a picture tutorial going along with these written instructions, be sure to view the video above! It will show you pictures to help with any tricky steps. You can pause it at any time if you need to focus in on a given step! Music in the video is credit to www.bensound.com.

Fsc a multiple of 7+4 (to start with a chain stitch, you’ll need a multiple of 7+5, and then one row of single crochet).

Row 1: With MC, ch 3, dc in next 2 sts. *With CC, dc 5. With MC, dc 2. Rep from * across, until 1 st left. Dc in last st, turn.

Row 2: With MC, ch 3, dc in next 3 dc. *With CC, bpdc over next st, dc in next st, bpdc over next st. With MC, dc in next 4 dc. Rep from * across, turn.

Row 3: With MC, ch 3, dc in next 4 dc. *With CC, fpdc over next dc. With MC, dc in next 6 dc. Rep from * across; on last repeat of MC dc there will be only 5 dc instead of 6. Turn.

Get This Stitch Pattern Ad-FREE + Bonus stitches!

Click HERE to buy the inexpensive PDF pattern, which includes all the Halloween stitches below:

How to crochet a triangle

Row 4: Rep row 1.

Row 5: With MC, ch 3, dc in next 3 dc. *With CC, fpdc over next dc, dc in next dc, fpdc over next dc. With MC, dc in next 4 dc. Rep from * across, turn.

Row 6: With MC, ch 3, dc in next 4 dc. *With CC, bpdc over next dc. With MC, dc in next 6 dc. Rep from * across; on last repeat of MC dc there will be only 5 dc instead of 6. Turn.

Rep rows 1-6 for stitch pattern!

I hope you have enjoyed learning how to crochet this fun stitch pattern.

If you have any questions at all, please don’t hesitate to email me: [email protected] I would love to help!

If you want to get new stitches and other free patterns straight to your inbox, sign up for my email list!