How to crochet a circle with increases

How to crochet a circle with increases

Świerk / Mollie Johanson

  • Total time: 30 minutes
  • Skill Level: Beginner

There are many ways to crochet a circle, but making one that isn’t wavy or crooked can be a challenge. Fortunately, there’s a basic formula for making your crochet circle flat. This crochet circle uses a sewing method with a slip stitch at the end of each round. An alternative would be to create continuous turns that lead to a spiral pattern rather than a circle. This is a fairly quick and easy method depending on how big you are going to make it. You can use flat crochet circles to create a variety of items including napkins, placemats, coasters, and rugs.

Watch Now: How to Crochet a Simple Circle

What you will need

Equipment / tools

  • Crochet

Materials

  • Yarn

Instructions

Round 1: work in single crochet to form a circle

Start with a knot and then two cathiselle. Then work six single crochet stitches in the second crochet section. Connect the points to join the end of the round.

This circle starts with six single crochet stitches, but you can customize it depending on the type of stitch you’re using. Use these general tips for the starting round:

  • Use six to 10 stitches on the first round on a single crochet.
  • Use eight to 12 stitches on the 1st round for the but
  • Use 10 to 14 stitches on the first round to crochet.

How to crochet a circle with increases

Round 2: make 2 single stitches in each stitch

In the second round of the circle, use two single crochet for each stitch already made. This makes a total of 12 crochet stitches in the second round. (If you started with a different number of stitches, you should have double the stitches of the round.) Move the stitch over the first stitch to join it.

How to crochet a circle with increases

Round 3: Work the pattern in single crochet

In the third round, use two single crochet for the next stitch, then alternate between one and two stitches. For a circle that started with six low crochet stitches, you will finish this round with 18 single crochet stitches. (For circles starting with a different number of stitches, this round should be three times the number of stitches on the first round.) Move the stitch to the first stitch.

How to crochet a circle with increases

Round 4: Work another single crochet pattern

In the fourth round, use a single crochet stitch for the next stitch, then another single crochet stitch in the next stitch, then two single crochet stitches in the next stitch. Repeat this pattern around the circle and move the point to join it to the first point.

How to crochet a circle with increases

Keep developing the circle

If you want to keep widening the circle, keep widening the pattern. On each round, add another single crochet stitch before making two single crochet stitches. For example, to create the fifth round, you would make a single crochet stitch in each of the first three stitches and then two single crochet stitches in the next stitch. And in the sixth round, you will work one crochet stitch in each of the first four stitches, followed by two single crochet stitches in the next stitch.

You can finish the crochet circle as soon as it’s big enough for you. If you want a circle with a finer edge, you can thread a stitch in each stitch all the way around. You can also add a serrated edge or another edge.

Crochet and knit blog

Have you ever noticed that when you work in the round in a crochet, you end up with a hexagon instead of a circle? In this post, you will learn a little trick for the perfect crochet ring.

How to crochet a circle with increases

Crochet pojedyncze jest jednym z pierwszych ściegów, których wszyscy uczymy się jako początkujący. It is also one of the most common and used. This technique will help you achieve the effect of a perfect circle with small adjustments to the pattern without changing it.

I learned this technique while making amigurumi, but it is also very useful when you want a flat, single crochet circle, such as when making pads or face scrubs.

Let’s look at an example. Most of the patterns you want to make with a crochet circle looked like this:

R1: MR, 6 sc in the ring, sc, 1 ch (6)
R2: 2 sc in each st around, double crochet, 1 ch (12)
R3: * sc, 2 sc * repeat from * to * around, ch ch, 1 ch (18)
R4: * sc in the next 2 sts, 2 sc. * repeat from * to * around ch, 1 ch (24)
R5: *p w 3 nast. o., 2 sc. * repeat from * to * around ch, 1 ch (30)
R6: *p w 4 nast. o., 2 sc. * repeat from * to * around ch, 1 ch (36)
R7: *p w 5 nast. m, 2 m. b * ripetere da * a * intorno, cat, 1 cat (42)
R8: *p w 6 nast. o., 2 sc. * repeat from * to * around ch, 1 ch (48)
R9: * next 7 ch, 2 sc * repeat from * to * around, ch, 1 ch (54)
R10: * ps in the next 8 h., 2 sc. * repeat from * to * around ch, 1 ch (60)

The reason your circle looks more than a hexagon is because of the small height of the individual crochet stitches and the fact that the increments are always on top of each other.

Now, what you want to do to fix it is quite simple. You just have to alternate just to place raises in equal rounds. How are you planning to achieve this? Well, on the rounds where you need to work an equal number of stitches before increasing this number in half.

Let’s make a perfect crochet circle

First of all, the first three rounds will look exactly the same.

R1: MR, 6 sc in the ring, sc, 1 ch (6)
R2: 2 sc in each st around, double crochet, 1 ch (12)
R3: * sc, 2 sc * repeat from * to * around, ch ch, 1 ch (18)

On round 4 you need to work an even number of stitches before the increase. Read in the motif “mb in the next 2 pers, 2mb”. Divide this number in half. 2: 2 = 1. Are you following me?

So we will take this number and use it in the first repetition of the formula. In the example above, we need to do 6 repetitions to complete the circle. So the first repetition will be “1 sc, 2 sc”. Then, for the next repetitions, follow the pattern “sc in the next 2, 2 sc”.

How to crochet a circle with increases

You still have a point to work on. Make a crochet in the last stitch. That is the single crochet we didn’t make at the first repeat of the pattern in the beginning.

Nothing has changed in the number of points this round. You have 24 points more. The only difference is the position of the increases. They are not on top of each other, but somewhere in between. This will become more evident in later rounds.

The new round 4 will now look like this:

R4: 1 mb, 2 mb, * mb w 2 następne o., 2 sc. * repeat from * to * around, 1 sc. in the last st, ch, 1 ch (24)

Continue round 5 because this is an odd round. Let’s make one more even numbered round.

Another example

On the sixth lap we have ps to the next. 4 o., 2 sc. “. Divide the number 4 in half. 4: 2 = 2. The new round 6 will look like this:

R6: 2 sc, 2 sc, * sc in the next 4 o., 2 sc. * ripetere da * a * intorno, mb w 2 ostatnie o., o. o., 1 oł (36)

How to crochet a circle with increases

That’s it! You don’t have to make any alterations to the pattern, just some small adjustments. Always read the instructions below for a final summary.

Final summary and instructions

  • The first three rounds remain unchanged.
  • On rounds with an even number of stitches before increasing, divide the number in half and use half at the beginning of the round and the rest in the last stitches at the end. The rest of the intermediate repetitions remain the same.
  • Rounds with an odd number of stitches before increasing remain unchanged.

Was this tutorial helpful to you? Any question?

Posted in Last updated: February 21, 2020 Categories Crochet patterns, Shapes

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How to crochet a circle with increases

Crochetwanie koła jest bardzo podobne do szydełkowania sześciokąta. Unlike the hexagon, the increases for the crochet circle are staggered in each even round, giving the last crochet piece a rounder look.

thiscrochet circle has many uses across industries. In Amigurumi, the circle is used for ears, eyes, faces, noses, and is the basis of the most important three-dimensional shapes such as balls and tubes used as arms, torso, heads and more.

thiscircle is also perfect to crochet easy and simple potholders and coasters. By crocheting a larger yarn and / or crochet, you can knit ponchos, hats, round blankets and more.

thisdepicted circle has been crocheted with the “Schachenmayr Catania” yarn with a Crochet 2,5 mm.

Crochetwy wzór koła

Techniques needed

  • Magic ring
  • Single crochet stitch (mb)
  • Increase

Needed Materials and Tools

  • Crochet 2,5 mm
  • Scoreboard
  • Colors: purple
  • This pattern was crocheted using the „Schachenmayr Catania“ yarn (100% Cotton, Meterage: 125 m, Yarn Ball Weight: 50 g, Yarn Weight: Sport – 5ply / Fine (2)) in the following colors:
  • Fuchsia (128)

All materials used are available on Amazon (Affiliate link):

More great posts

How to crochet a circle with increases

How to crochet a circle with increases

How to crochet a circle with increases

How to crochet a circle with increases

How to crochet a circle with increases

How to crochet a circle with increases

Crochet circle

Lavora il crochet circleFuchsiaspiral with crochet single crochet stitches.

How to crochet a circle with increases

Use the check boxes to select completed rounds, lines, and steps.

  • Lavora il crochet circle spiralnych kółkach wFuchsia.
  • Round 1: 6 sc into the Magic ring (6 stitches).
  • Round 2:[1 increase] repeat to the end of the round (12 stitches).
  • Round 3:[1 sc, 1 added] repeat the round (18 stitches).
  • Round 4:1 sc, 1 sc more, [2 sc, 1 st more] repeat 5 times, 1 sc. (24 links).
  • Round 5:[3 sc, 1 increase] repeat to the end of the round (30 stitches).
  • Round 6:2 sc, 1 sc more, [4 sc, 1 sc more] repeat 5 times, 2 sc. (36 links).
  • Round 7:[5 sc, 1 decrease] to the end of the round (42 stitches).

Viene creato un crochet circle. If you want to work a larger circle, continue with the pattern below.

If you want to work an even bigger circle, move the increments on every even round, starting with the fourth round.

Work the next rounds with a larger circle:

  • Round 8:3 sc, 1 extra, [6 sc, 1 extra] repeat up to 5 times (48 stitches).
  • Round 9:[7 sc, 1 increase] repeat to the end of the round (54 stitches).
  • Round 10:4 sc, 1 more sc, [8 sc, 1 more] repeat 5 times, 4 sc. (60 points).
  • Round 11:[9 sc, 1 increase] repeat to the end of the round (66 stitches).
  • Round 12:5 sc, 1 more sc, [10 sc, 1 more] repeat 5 times, 5 sc. (72 points).
  • Round 13:[11 sc, 1 decrease] repeat to the end of the round (78 stitches).
  • Round 14:6 sc, 1 reduction, [12 sc, 1 reduction] repeat 5 times, 6 sc. (84 links).
  • Round 15:[13 sc, 1 decrease] repeat to the end of the round (90 stitches).
  • Round 16:7 sc, 1 sc more, [14 sc, 1 st more] repeat 5 times, 7 sc. (96 points).
  • Round 17:[15 sc, 1 decrease] to the end of the round (102 stitches).

Crochet tips, solutions and patterns

Have you ever made a wheel that was wavy or curly when you wanted it flat? This is what happened to the round rug I was making recently. Sometimes you want your project to turn out frilly and ruffled, but I wanted my rug to be flat so it wouldn’t become a tripping hazard.

Fortunately, there are a few simple ways to repair wavy vertebrae.

At first glance, it may appear that the pattern has too many increments. But what if you’ve checked the number of stitches three times and the pattern you applied should form a flat circle?

thisproblem might be the size of the hook you’re using. Try using a smaller hook!

To prove it, here are two placemats that I made with the same pattern and the same yarn but with different hooks.

thiswavy, curled coaster on the left was made with a US size 10.5 (6.5mm) hook. thisflat coaster on the right was made with the same pattern and the same yarn, but with a smaller US size H/8 (5mm) hook.

There’s another solution you can try if you’re not strictly following a pattern. Make a loop of small, tight stitches, like a single crochet, without adding any more. This may be enough to flatten the circle.

Crochet tips, solutions and patterns

You sit down to start a new project that begins with crocheting a circular shape. Maybe it’s an amigurumi, or maybe it’s a coaster, or possibly even a hat. After a few turns you discover that your work looks like a hexagon and you wonder what happened? Why doesn’t it look like the finished object in the pattern photos?

Has it ever happened to you? Luckily, there’s an easy way to fix this. I’ll show you how you can modify existing patterns to give you a smooth, round circle instead of a hexagon.

Why is this happening?

Well, to create a circular shape when you crochet a round you need to add more stitches to each round as your circle gets bigger. Otherwise, you’ll end up with a cylinder instead of a flat circle. Potresti aver notato che la maggior parte dei modelli circolari assomiglia a this:

Make a ring: A.) Chain 3 and thread a stitch in the first chain to create a small ring, or B.) Make a magic ring (also known as a magic circle).

Rnd 1: 6 mb in the ring. (6th place)
Round 2: (2 sc to next st) six times. (12.)
Round 3: (2 sc for next stitch, sc for next stitch) six times. (18th place)
Rnd 4: (2 sc in the next stitch, sc in the next 2 stitches) six times. (24 seats)
Rnd 5: (2 sc in the next stitch, sc in the next 3 stitches) six times. (30th place)
Rnd 6: (2 sc in the next stitch, sc in the next 4 stitches) six times. (36 seats)
Round 7: (2 sc in the next stitch, sc in the next 5th stitch) six times. (42 seats)
Rnd 8: (2 sc in next stitch, sc in next 6th stitch) six times. (48 seats)

Basically, after the first round, each round will have 6 raises. (By increase: I’m referring to when you perform 2 of the same stitch into one stitch – in this case, 2 sc into next st.)

With each bigger round, you’ll add more single stitches (in this case, single crochet) to the round. Round 2 only has raises. Round 3 has 6 single stitches evenly spaced between the stitches. As you progress through the rounds, add 6 extra single points to each round. These individual points should be evenly spaced between the points.

But when you try to make a circle as described above, all the increases you make will end up with the increases from the previous row. Some people describe it as a “stack” of increases, because the increases end up stacking on top of each other.

This leads to the hexagon shape, because when you perform an increase, you’re putting more yarn in a small area than when you perform single stitches. If your increases are all stacked, that means you’re concentrating more yarn material in certain areas – specifically, in 6 specific areas. Think of your crochet wheel like a 6-spoke bicycle wheel. thisextra material ends up sitting right along each spoke.

Increases were done in turquoise. Single crochet hooks were made in cream.

Kiedy próbujesz spłaszczyć swoją pracę, cóż, cały this dodatkowy materiał/przędza musi gdzieś iść! After all, it extends beyond the edge of your circle in 6 areas, turning it into a hexagon.

How to fix it:

To achieve a circle, you want to make sure your increases don’t end up stacked. You want them to be spread out, so the increases can’t stack and end up jutting out into a hexagon shape.

To do this, you’ll need to change the position of your increases by spreading them out, but you don’t want to add or remove any stitches. You’ll just be changing the order in which you do the stitches.

A simple method I have found is to leave the odd rounds unchanged (such as round 3, round 5, etc.) and change only the even rounds (round 4, round 6, etc.) as follows: (changes highlighted in green)

Rnd 1: 6 mb in the ring. (6th place)
Round 2: (2 sc to next st) six times. (12.)
Round 3: (2 sc for next stitch, sc for next stitch) six times. (18th place)
Rnd 4: (p. s. w następne oczko, 2 ps. w następne oczko, p. s. w następne oczko) sześć razy. (24 seats)
Rnd 5: (2 sc in the next stitch, sc in the next 3 stitches) six times. (30th place)
Rnd 6: (sc in the next 2 stitches, sc in the next stitch, sc in the next 2 stitches) six times. (36 seats)
Round 7: (2 sc in the next stitch, sc in the next 5th stitch) six times. (42 seats)
Round 8: (sc in the next 3 stitches, sc in the next stitch, sc in the next 3 stitches) six times. (48 seats)

For the even rounds, we’ve positioned each repeated increase in the middle of their accompanying single crochets. For example, in round 4, the repeated instructions are 1 increase and 2 double crochets. If you increase the increase in the middle of these 2 double crochets, finally do: 1 double crochet, then increase, then another double crochet. Questo viene ripetuto 6 volte per completare this round.

Same with round 6: in this round, you’re supposed to do 1 increase with 4 single crochets. If you increase the increase in the middle of the double crochets, you will have 2 double crochets, then the increase and then 2 double crochets. (E lo ripeti 6 volte in this round.)

Dovresti ottenere qualcosa che assomiglia a this:

Why are we just changing even rounds?

Because we can’t really center something in the odd-numbered rounds. If you had an odd number of single crochets, and I asked you to put an increase in the center of that, you couldn’t perfectly center it. You’d either have:

You can’t hit it!

But in even rounds you can.

Once you understand this, there’s no need to save or memorize the modification. You’ll be able to figure it out anywhere.

Why do we need to hit even-round earnings? Couldn’t we just offset the increase a little, instead of centering it?

Yup! You certainly could.

But centering is a simple method that produces consistent results. I was trying to compensate for the increases in each row (odd and even). This took a lot more effort to make sure things turned out well – I’d have to write down where I moved the increases, to keep track of what I did, and it was a hassle. This method of centering the increases in only the even rounds is the simplest and easiest way that I’ve found.

As you can see, when you open your growths, the extra material that comes from each growth will be distributed. This creates a smooth, rounded circular shape instead of a hexagon.

You got it right. Hope it will help. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to ask them below!

Crochet tips, solutions and patterns

You sit down to start a new project that begins with crocheting a circular shape. Maybe it’s an amigurumi, or maybe it’s a coaster, or possibly even a hat. After a few turns you discover that your work looks like a hexagon and you wonder what happened? Why doesn’t it look like the finished object in the pattern photos?

Has it ever happened to you? Luckily, there’s an easy way to fix this. I’ll show you how you can modify existing patterns to give you a smooth, round circle instead of a hexagon.

Why is this happening?

Well, to create a circular shape when you crochet a round you need to add more stitches to each round as your circle gets bigger. Otherwise, you’ll end up with a cylinder instead of a flat circle. Potresti aver notato che la maggior parte dei modelli circolari assomiglia a this:

Make a ring: A.) Chain 3 and thread a stitch in the first chain to create a small ring, or B.) Make a magic ring (also known as a magic circle).

Rnd 1: 6 mb in the ring. (6th place)
Round 2: (2 sc to next st) six times. (12.)
Round 3: (2 sc for next stitch, sc for next stitch) six times. (18th place)
Rnd 4: (2 sc in the next stitch, sc in the next 2 stitches) six times. (24 seats)
Rnd 5: (2 sc in the next stitch, sc in the next 3 stitches) six times. (30th place)
Rnd 6: (2 sc in the next stitch, sc in the next 4 stitches) six times. (36 seats)
Round 7: (2 sc in the next stitch, sc in the next 5th stitch) six times. (42 seats)
Rnd 8: (2 sc in next stitch, sc in next 6th stitch) six times. (48 seats)

Basically, after the first round, each round will have 6 raises. (By increase: I’m referring to when you perform 2 of the same stitch into one stitch – in this case, 2 sc into next st.)

With each bigger round, you’ll add more single stitches (in this case, single crochet) to the round. Round 2 only has raises. Round 3 has 6 single stitches evenly spaced between the stitches. As you progress through the rounds, add 6 extra single points to each round. These individual points should be evenly spaced between the points.

But when you try to make a circle as described above, all the increases you make will end up with the increases from the previous row. Some people describe it as a “stack” of increases, because the increases end up stacking on top of each other.

This leads to the hexagon shape, because when you perform an increase, you’re putting more yarn in a small area than when you perform single stitches. If your increases are all stacked, that means you’re concentrating more yarn material in certain areas – specifically, in 6 specific areas. Think of your crochet wheel like a 6-spoke bicycle wheel. thisextra material ends up sitting right along each spoke.

Increases were done in turquoise. Single crochet hooks were made in cream.

Kiedy próbujesz spłaszczyć swoją pracę, cóż, cały this dodatkowy materiał/przędza musi gdzieś iść! After all, it extends beyond the edge of your circle in 6 areas, turning it into a hexagon.

How to fix it:

To achieve a circle, you want to make sure your increases don’t end up stacked. You want them to be spread out, so the increases can’t stack and end up jutting out into a hexagon shape.

To do this, you’ll need to change the position of your increases by spreading them out, but you don’t want to add or remove any stitches. You’ll just be changing the order in which you do the stitches.

A simple method I have found is to leave the odd rounds unchanged (such as round 3, round 5, etc.) and change only the even rounds (round 4, round 6, etc.) as follows: (changes highlighted in green)

Rnd 1: 6 mb in the ring. (6th place)
Round 2: (2 sc to next st) six times. (12.)
Round 3: (2 sc for next stitch, sc for next stitch) six times. (18th place)
Rnd 4: (p. s. w następne oczko, 2 ps. w następne oczko, p. s. w następne oczko) sześć razy. (24 seats)
Rnd 5: (2 sc in the next stitch, sc in the next 3 stitches) six times. (30th place)
Rnd 6: (sc in the next 2 stitches, sc in the next stitch, sc in the next 2 stitches) six times. (36 seats)
Round 7: (2 sc in the next stitch, sc in the next 5th stitch) six times. (42 seats)
Round 8: (sc in the next 3 stitches, sc in the next stitch, sc in the next 3 stitches) six times. (48 seats)

For the even rounds, we’ve positioned each repeated increase in the middle of their accompanying single crochets. For example, in round 4, the repeated instructions are 1 increase and 2 double crochets. If you increase the increase in the middle of these 2 double crochets, finally do: 1 double crochet, then increase, then another double crochet. Questo viene ripetuto 6 volte per completare this round.

Same with round 6: in this round, you’re supposed to do 1 increase with 4 single crochets. If you increase the increase in the middle of the double crochets, you will have 2 double crochets, then the increase and then 2 double crochets. (E lo ripeti 6 volte in this round.)

Dovresti ottenere qualcosa che assomiglia a this:

Why are we just changing even rounds?

Because we can’t really center something in the odd-numbered rounds. If you had an odd number of single crochets, and I asked you to put an increase in the center of that, you couldn’t perfectly center it. You’d either have:

You can’t hit it!

But in even rounds you can.

Once you understand this, there’s no need to save or memorize the modification. You’ll be able to figure it out anywhere.

Why do we need to hit even-round earnings? Couldn’t we just offset the increase a little, instead of centering it?

Yup! You certainly could.

But centering is a simple method that produces consistent results. I was trying to compensate for the increases in each row (odd and even). This took a lot more effort to make sure things turned out well – I’d have to write down where I moved the increases, to keep track of what I did, and it was a hassle. This method of centering the increases in only the even rounds is the simplest and easiest way that I’ve found.

As you can see, when you open your growths, the extra material that comes from each growth will be distributed. This creates a smooth, rounded circular shape instead of a hexagon.

You got it right. Hope it will help. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to ask them below!

How to crochet a circle with increases

Making the Perfect Crochet circle

If you’ve ever crocheted a round motif, such as a circle or mandala, you may have wondered why the circle sometimes ruffles or curls. Let’s take a closer look at what causes these problems and how you can easily solve them.

Why does it shrivel?

Ruffles look beautiful when they’re inthistional, like on the edging of a baby blanket or a ruffly scarf. But when you want the circular pattern to be flat, it’s frustrating. A flounce usually forms because there are too many stitches in the loop. thisstitches start to get crowded, and for a lack of better place to go, they bunch up and create a ruffle.

Solution: Tighten (tear off) the round and work fewer stitches again.

Why is it collapsing?

Curling can help hats or balls shape properly, but again, it’s aggravating if you want a flat circle. Most of the time your project will curl because you don’t have enough stitches in your round. thisstitches are being stretched and pulled in two different directions. To stay in touch, the topic will collapse.

Solution: frogs on the round and increase more stitches – work two stitches more often in the same stitch or space on the round.

Other reasons why the wheels are not flat

thismain culprits for ruffling and curling are too many or too few stitches. But there are a few other things that can keep your theme from staying flat.

1. thishook size may be wrong. If the hook you’re using is too small for the yarn weight, your crochet circle may curl.

2. The meter may be turned off. Strong crochet can cause the fabric to pucker.

3. Different stitch heights will affect the crochet fabric. For example, if some rows are single crochet and others are double crochet, you will need to adjust the number of stitches on each round to make it fit. This is especially true of napkins and mandalas such as the Desert Rose Mandala Crochet loveSpring 2017.

4. Replacing the wire can cause problems. If a pattern requires specific yarn, such as finger weights, replacing bulky yarns can cause problems. You may need to add or remove stitches in the new yarn to keep the piece flat.

5. Incrementing or decreasing inconsistently can make the circle jagged. Try to distribute it evenly when adding or removing extra stitches.

Soon you will be making the perfect crochet circle! Let’s see mandala on your horizon …

thisMagic Formula

It’s not really magical, but there is a mathematic formula for making the perfect circle. Detto this, a volte può essere necessario bloccare la vertebra in modo che sia completamente piatta. And you’ll want to consider the other reasons listed above.

But in general, the following formula works for the basic vertebrae:

Circle motif
5 ch, ch in the first ch to make a ring.
Round 1: Ch 1 (does not count as full st), 12 tr on ring, sl st in first but to join – 12 tr
Rnd 2: Ch 1, 2 sc in each pin around, sl st over first sc to connect -24 sc.
Rnd 3: 1 ch, sc in the same stitch as the union, 2 sc in the next point, * sc in the next point, 2 sc in the next point; ripetere da * intorno, m. bss nella prima m. a per unire – 36 m. a.
Rnd 4: 1 ch, sc in the same stitch as the union and next stitch, 2 sc in the next. m, * m. a nelle 2 m successive, 2 m. a nella m successiva; ripetere da * intorno, m. bss nella prima m. a per unire —48 m. a.
Rnd 5: 1 ch, sc in the same stitch as the union and 2 subsequent sc, 2 sc in the next stitch, * sc in the next 3 stitches, 2 sc in the next stitch; ripetere da * intorno, m. bss nella prima m. a per unire —60 m. a.
Rnd 6: 1 ch, sc in the same stitch as the attachment and in the next 3 stitches, 2 sc in the next stitch, * sc in the next 4 sts, 2 sc in the next stitch; ripetere da * intorno, m. bss nella prima m. a per unire – 72 m. a.

Do you see the math going on? Ogni giro aggiunge lo stesso numero di maglie che inizi nel giro 1. In this caso, il giro 1 aveva 12 maglie alte, quindi aggiungi 12 maglie in più per ogni giro successivo.

To do this, add new points evenly on each round. In round 2, the circle is 12 to 24 stitches, so work two double crochets in each stitch. Round 3 has a height of every second stitch (ending with 36 treble crochets), round 4 has a height of every third stitch (ending with 48 treble crochets) and so on. thismath is even more obvious in the way I used to write patterns (prior to working at Interweave). To this sam wzór, napisany tylko w bardziej skróconym formacie.

Circle motif Abbreviated
Special point
Increase (inc): 2 dc in next st.
5 ch, ch in the first ch to make a ring.
Round 1: Ch 1 (does not count as full st) 12 tr in the ring, join sl st in first st-12 tr
Rnd 2: Ch 1, sc inc around, connect to sl st in first sc-24 sc.
Round 3: Ch 1, * 1 sc, sc inc * around, connect with sl st in first sc-36 sc.
Rnd 4: Ch 1, * 2 sc, sc inc * around, connect with sl st in first sc – 48 sc.
Rnd 5: Ch 1, * 3 sc, sc inc * around, connect with sl st in first sc-60 sc.
Rnd 6: Ch 1, * 4 sc, sc inc * around, connect with sl st in first sc-72 sc.

With this abbreviated way of writing the pattern, the magic formula, which I’ve bolded, really stands out. You can quickly see that to make the circle wider, simply add another stitch between the increases in each round.

Practice Your Perfect Crochet circle

Practice makes perfect, so don’t be afraid to experiment with the circle pattern above. Adjust the size of your hook and thread to see how these changes will affect your wheels. Then take your new skill to the next level by trying patterns for hats, mandalas and other circular patterns. You’ll find great patterns for circles in Modern crochet mandalas, send it inCrochet love, Spring 2017, Bear Lake Hat and Sketch Set.

When crocheting in the round, it is important to know the basics. You’ll want your blankets or loveys to stay flat, right?

Or even if you want to start making Amigurumi, it’s important to learn the basic rules of round crochet first.

To keep it flat, you’ll have to do some very simple math. First you’ll need a reference stitch. I always use single crochet hooks because it works best for me.

I’ve selected the 3 most basic crochet stitches to show you how this technique works, but as long as you use the reference point to do the calculation, you can use any stitch!

To calculate the proportions of a stitch, you’ll need to make a swatch first. Next you’ll compare the stitch count of this swatch, with your swatch of single crochet stitches. It’s getting a bit blurry before your eyes? Don’t worry, I’ll explain it all to you in the next three points.

Now… I can hear you think: “Yeah… but on your photo’s the circles clearly aren’t flat.” That’s right. But I purposefully didn’t block my swatches to show you how it looks before blocking. You’ve noticed that the edge is curling up a bit and that’s great! But no worries, every next round you’ll crochet, it will straighthis out. And after blocking, you’ll have the perfect flat circle.

Each has a slightly different voltage or point definition. Also every yarn crochets a bit different, as well as the hook you’re using.

If you find that, despite the basic rules, your work curls or wobbles, you can change crochet.

My work is shaking

This means that your seams are too big. I recommend going down for a 1/2 size 1 crochet hook or using another fabric crochet hook.

My work is collapsing

If this happens, your seams are too small. Anche in this caso consiglio di sostituire l’uncinetto. You can choose a larger hook or a hook of a different material.

Per this post ho usato Drops Paris e un uncinetto Clover Amour da 5 mm.

To determine which size you will use your hook, simply check the label on your thread. Most of the time you’ll find a symbol of a crochet hook on it, with a number besides it. This number indicates at what size the hook is recommended.

pan = magic ring
mb = low point
hdc = half double crochet
dc = double crochet
increase = increase by making 2 stitches in the same stitches
decrease = decrease by working the next 2 stitches together

(…) x times = repeat what is in parentheses the indicated number of times (or until the end of your round)
(number) = number in brackets, indicates the number of stitches you should have at the end of the round.

Increase 6 stitches every round, if you’re using single crochet. If you like your circle to be perfectly round, you’ll want to space the increases evenly, but every round on a different place. If you increase on the same spot every round, you’ll end up with a hexagon. This doesn’t really matter, if you’re making amigurumis, but if might if you’re making a blanket or a lovey.

This is just one example. You can boost wherever you want in each round, as long as your boosts are equally spaced.

  1. make 6 sc in sig (6)
  2. (included) x6 (12)
  3. (1 mb, Inc) x6 (18)
  4. (included, 2 mb) x6 (24)
  5. (3 mb, inc) x6 (30)
  6. (2 mb, addition, 2 mb) x6 (36)
  7. (included, 5 mb) x6 (42)
  8. (4 mb, added, 2 mb) x6 (48)
  9. (1 mb, add, 6 mb) x6 (54)
  10. (5 mb, addition, 3 mb) x6 (60)

That’s how it works! If you want to add rounds to your circle to make it bigger, simply increase 6 stitches on each round.

thishalf double crochet stitch is about 1,5 times the size of a single crochet stitch. You just found that you need to start with 6 points to keep the wheel flat. This means that for a half double crochet circle, you’ll need to increase 1,5 times more.

6 x 1.5 = 9 stitches

So let’s make 9 half double crochet in a magic ring. Next we’re gonna increase 9 stitches every round. Also, make sure the earnings are evenly distributed this time.

  1. make 9 hdc in mr (9)
  2. (together) x9 (18)
  3. (1 hard drive included) x9 (27)
  4. (included, 2 hdc) x9 (36)
  5. (3 hdc, down) x9 (45)
  6. (2 hdc, Inc, 2 hdc) x9 (54)

If you want to make it bigger, keep adding those 9 increases every round.

Crochet podwójne jest około 2 razy większe niż szydełko pojedyncze. If we use the same calculation trick we used before, it means:

6 x 2 = 12 stitches

So this time you start with 12 double crochet stitches in a magic ring. Next we’re gonna increase 12 stitches every round, spaced evenly.

  1. make 12 mb in mr (12)
  2. (included) x12 (24)
  3. (1 mb, doc.) X12 (36)
  4. (included, 2cc) x12 (48)
  5. (3 dc, dock) x12 (60)

Do you want to enlarge it? Just increase 12 treble crochets on each round.

Now that you know this, you can start experimenting with different types of stitches. Mix and match to create a wonderful round baby blanket. Make sure you do your swap first and compare it to a single crochet swap to do your math.

I am really curious about all the beautiful things you will create! Let’s get crocheting in the round.