How to cope with sheltering in place with your family

The “self quarantine” or “shelter in place” can be frustrating and uncomfortable. One huge problem is that we’re spending much more time than we’re used to in the same room—or the same limited spaces—with our “loved ones.” The quote marks around those words don’t mean we’ve fallen out of love. We’re just not used to being around each Other this much. We want more space, more variety in our contacts, more freedom to be where we’d like to.

Communication research can be helpful. Here are 7 theory-based and research-based tips to perfect your communication to help you cope with the pressures that could be caused by the COVID-19 pandemic in your family.

1 Reminder coverage offer At the start of the day, tell each family member, “I love you today.” It’ll feel awkward the first time. And your days together are bound to include moments when you really don’t feel loving. If the day’s started with this reminder, though, frustrations and disagreements will have been framed with this starter, so they’ll be interpreted in this context. Some family members may or may not be willing or able to make the effort. Do it anyway; think of it as a gift for the home.

2 You lose the "but" use "I". “I love you, but I wish you’d change your underwear more often.” Notice how what’s said after the “but” cancels out “I love you”? When you substitute “and” for “but” you’re making two statements, each of which stands on its own. You can hear them equal. One doesn’t cancel out the Other. It’s a small change in what you say, AND it can make a real difference.

3 Always listen first. The “ALF principle” is suitable for any communication situation. In the ancient tradition, humans are born with only one mouth but two ears (note how the word “but” works here?). When you’re attacked, ask for an example of the problem he thinks you created. Use the grievance as an opportunity to speak up, not a defense. Avoid unnecessary fighting by removing yourself instead of attacking her. The most effective communicators know that conscious, empathic and active listening works wonders.

4 Make generous, non-selfish choices. When you crave loud music and Others don’t, turn it down. If a room’s too messy for you, straighten it rather than bitching about it. Do your part to keep the bathroom clean. Couples who really want to be together learn this from their relationship m being more important than being right, and this principle also applies to families. No family member should be a doormat and no one will be as long as everyone makes us equal or more important than me.

5. Approach the problem. Everyone knows the difficulties an elephant creates when it’s in the living room. Especially when more than one family member notices a problem, she seeks out and even creates an opportunity to talk. “Can we have a conversation about what’s happening almost every morning?” “I’d like us to talk about the money problems, not just yell about them.” When family problems are ignored, they almost always get bigger. Communication is the only way to deal with them. Of course, it must be effective communication that starts with listening, respecting and prioritizing relationships. However, set a time to fix the problem instead of continuing to ignore it.

6. Use a moment of silence. Guidelines 5 and 6 go hand in hand. Sometimes the problem is too intense, too difficult to discuss constructively. A break from family conversation about this issue can help anyone communicate it effectively enough to focus on other topics for a few hours or even days. The thing about feelings, whether they’re good or bad ones, is that they always change. When a particularly difficult problem arises, take the time to create a productive space to talk about it.

7 Accept the golden secret: it always takes two. Statements like “You started it!” “It is not my problem!” and “It’s your fault!” these are the most common and poisonous that couples and family members do to each other. And they’re never accurate. Never. Communication always happens between people. It’s always, always at least a two-person production. When someone knows how to press your buttons, it can really feel like it “hurts your feelings” or “makes you look funny”. But your hurt feelings come from a combination of what they said and what you think is important.

Another way to say this is to remind yourself that communication in your family started before you were born. It was happening in the room when you came out of the womb, and plenty of research confirms that you’ve been affected by family patterns that are much older than you are. Everything you say and everything you interpret can be seen as a response to this constant communication. The same goes for all members of your family. None of you “started” it. Sometimes you just continue what’s been going on, and sometimes you interrupt the pattern.

Released this year, a heavily annotated 454-page academic book reveals the truth of this secret. It’s called Communicate and establish contacts, and it develops what it’s author, Robert Arundale, calls—are you ready?—“The Conjoint Co-constituting Model of Communicating.” Bob demonstrates how the basic process that makes us human (on p. 109 he calls it “the primordial constitutive social process”) is “everyday face-to-face conversation,” and it’s always, always co-constructed by its participants. If you doubt the accuracy of this Golden Secret, have a look at Bob’s book.

The practical value of this Secret is that when you remember and apply it, your communication, especially with those who “take refuge” with you, will improve. You will play a role in family problems, your contribution to difficulties. You will be able to see how the situation – being stuck listening to scary news every day – is contributing to the problem. You will stop seeing yourself as the target of any negative affirmations you hear.

You will know that because problems are always co-constructed, they can be solved or resolved through polite, kind, respectful and loving communication.

The co-author of this article is the Disaster Distress Helpline. The Disaster Distress Helpline, 1-800-985-5990, is a 24/7, 365 days a year, nationwide helpline dedicated to providing immediate emergency advice to people experiencing emotional distress associated with natural or man-made causes. a disaster. This free, multilingual, and confidential emergency support service is available to all residents of the United States and its territories. Stress, ansia e altri sintomi simili alla depressione sono reazioni comuni dopo a disaster. Call 1-800-985-5990 or message TalkWithUs at 66746 to contact a crisis counselor.

This article cites 18 references and can be found at the bottom of the page.

This article has been viewed 36,335 times.

During natural disasters, infectious disease outbreaks such as COVID-19, and other major emergencies, it may be necessary to take shelter on the spot. This means you have to stay where you are—whether you’re at home, at a friend’s house, at school, or at work—until the danger m passed and local authorities give you permission to move around freely. [1] X Research Source It may seem simple at first, but no matter how much you love your comfy sofa, you may end up feeling a little crazy and wanting to get out. Basic strategies such as sticking to healthy habits and engaging in anti-stress activities can also help. If you start to feel too overwhelmed, don’t be afraid to reach out for help.

The key is to do everything possible to make you feel more like yourself.

How to cope with sheltering in place with your family

Because we are stuck at home observing the orders of “social distancing” or “shelter”, many of us suffer from a reactive form of anxiety and depression. While we may have considerable anxiety about the possible health and financial impact of the virus, there is also an insidious loss we are suffering. It is the loss of self-experience we go through when we are unable to engage in our daily and weekly activities.

When we practice mindfulness, we focus on the experience of ourselves. When we don’t practice mindfulness, we aren’t fully aware of our experience of self. This, of course, doesn’t mean we aren’t having the experiences, only that we are not paying attention to it. If we aren’t aware of our self-experiences, we might not be aware that we are suffering the loss of them, only that we are feeling out of sorts.

Routines give us self-esteem

We know ourselves through our interactions with the different people and situations we encounter. Different experiences give us different experiences with ourselves. Our routine experiences give us a sense of continuity because our responses are relatively consistent.

Engaging in different activities gives us different experiences with ourselves. If we’re not particularly athletic, we can feel a little embarrassed in the gym, even though we can be a fierce competitor at work. The combination of experiences that make up our days and weeks helps us feel ourselves. Even if we constantly feel uncomfortable in a given situation, this intimacy provides a form of comfort: we feel ourselves.

Interrupted routines interrupt our sense of self

We may not pay attention to the cup of coffee we get at our favorite coffee shop on our daily business trip (remember that?). Yet when the cafe is closed, we feel uncomfortable. Of course, there is always coffee somewhere, so it may turn out that we quickly get used to the changes and can go on living.

When we are unable to maintain most of our habits, we begin to feel uncomfortable: we lose ourselves. When the change in our routines has been abrupt and not of our choosing, such as current social isolation, it can feel like a traumatic loss of self.

The more significant the disorder, the more it affects our sense of self.

Traumatic loss of yourself

The loss of self we experience in times of social isolation is traumatic and rapid for many of us. Many describe the current situation as “surreal”, focusing on all the changes in the outside world. If we are focused on our self-experience, we might say, “My experience of reality m changed to the point that I don’t recognize myself in it.”

When change is slow, we may not notice subtle changes in our experience of ourselves. Also, when we make a change ourselves, we are more likely to explain our discomfort as being caused by us, hoping to make the change for the better.

While the calls for “social distancing” and “refuge in place” are certainly for us and for the greater good, many of us perceive them as a quick and startling change in our daily lived experience, a change that is not our choice. . . The resulting loss of self is destabilizing and therefore traumatic. Also, the change is not clearly seen, leaving us to wonder what the rest of life could be like. Will this crisis ever end? Anxiety and / or depression and despair can be quickly controlled.

Some of us are late to wake up later in the day, making our days seem shorter. This reversal of sleep patterns is a sign of depression, and giving in to it can ultimately make depression worse: if we’re wasting a day, we’ll soon feel like we’re wasting our lives.

Others of us have rushed to work from home, sticking to one aspect of life that allows us to feel normal. While work is a great way to access your experience, working to exclude everything else can be a way to avoid being aware of the changes we’re experiencing – this hidden stress ultimately leads to burnout.

How can I find the sense of myself?

The best way to regain a sense of yourself is to stick to our old habits as much as possible. When we can’t do those, we must develop new routines—they will soon feel familiar and give us a new sense of self-continuity.

Stick to old routines as often as possible

  • Do what makes us feel ourselves. If possible, we should try to keep our old habits. For example: If showering and getting dressed to go to work in the morning is important to feeling yourself, you should dress for work, even if you work remotely and no one will see you.
  • Stick to the schedule. Keep the same schedule we had before the crisis. For example: if we have been training after work, we can do online training after we have finished working remotely.
  • Alternative solutions. The Internet is full of alternative solutions, from “dat FaceTime” to “virtual happy hours” with colleagues in video chat. (Note: in times of greatest stress, you have to be careful with alcohol consumption).

Create new routines

  • Create a new program.If our old schedules don’t work, we need to create new ones and stick to them.
  • Do what makes us feel effective. In times like these when we don’t feel like we have many choices, it is imperative that we do things that make us feel effective—a great antidote to any sense of futility and helplessness. An instructor at a senior center calls her students to see how they are, which gives her a sense of being helpful. “I felt more like myself. This is what I do, I connect with people. “
  • Do things you’ve never had time for. Over the years, many of us have wished we had more time during the day. Now we may think we have too much. It will end too. Use the extra time to read a book or spend time with your family, even on the phone. Consider this moment as a precious gift. It will go away soon.

We always hear that taking care of yourself is important. It is equally important to know the specific kind of self-care we need. One of the types of self-care that is unique to us individually is what we can do to restore our sense of continuity, to overcome the traumatic loss of self-experience caused by “social distancing” and “refuge in place”.

How to help teenagers to shelter?

Teenagers are not meant to be isolated. Here’s how to help your kids see the bigger picture during COVID-19.

Parents around the world are struggling to give their kids and students an “on-the-spot shelter”. Teens aren’t cut out for isolation, which makes COVID-19 especially difficult for them and makes it difficult to control.

How to cope with sheltering in place with your family

One of my friends comes off. “My kids bypass the rules and are with their friends every time I close my office door.” She m two college students home and a big corporate job she’s got to keep doing. She’s trying to care for elderly in-laws, and her daughter needs medication that she’s having trouble securing. “I feel I should be able to control them. I’m trying. But my anxiety is so heavy. I’m emotionally exhausted.”

Social isolation is difficult for people of all ages. But because teens and young adults are more in tune with social status than the rest of us, it’s even more depressing for them.

How to cope with sheltering in place with your family

Furthermore, their constant attunement to the welfare state makes them very touchy that they are treated like children. This means that they feel infantilized when ordered to take refuge there.

What can we do to encourage adolescents to adhere to social distancing measures?

We have to work with their existing motivations. Teens are unlikely to be convinced by (brilliant! Logicians! Passionate!) Arguments that contradict their innate and developmental motivations.

It starts with their motivation to get out of our control

We can work with this existing motivation by treating them as competent young adults, not small children. For example, we can:

  • Expect to make a significant contribution to our family. They can help you prepare meals and clean the house. Our children help with cleaning by vacuuming and cleaning work surfaces. Keeping conflict low in difficult conditions is a significant contribution. Planning fun activities for your family can be the most important contribution of all!
  • Let them manage themselves, their school work and other responsibilities without complaining or asking. This does not mean that we won’t be engaged with them. This means that we give them the space to act freely within the limits we agree as a family.
  • Ask them to help usourwork as much as possible. “My kids keep interrupting me when Zoom calls me about stupid things,” wrote a friend, completely frustrated. Anche gli adolescenti più grandi (e i coniugi!) hanno bisogno che siamo chiari su come il loro continuo disturbo ci colpisce. Explain rather than accuse: “I feel embarrassed and stressed when I’m on a video call, and you keep poking your head in to ask questions,” rather than “It is inconsiderate and selfish of you to keep interrupting my meetings.”
  • Use uncontrollable, non-directive language. For example, ask questions instead of telling them what to do. My all-time favorite question is “What’s your plan?” As in: “What’s your plan for getting some exercise today?” This clearly shows that they are still in control of their own behavior and helps them get in touch with their own motives and intentions.
  • Confirm it’s all thereso hard. Many students returning home from school now suffer significant losses. It is difficult to deal with their feelings of regret, anxiety, stress and isolation. And also: one of the great lessons of adulthood is that they can do difficult things.

Take advantage of their harmony with the social world

We can also draw on their high attunement to the social world by emphasizing how their lives have purpose, meaning and impact onOther people. Here are some discussion points:

  • You are not a passive actor here when it comes to running. Your actions are directly affecting the course of this crisis. We ask ourselves: what do you really care most about in this crisis?
  • Who can you help and who are you afraid of doing harm? How can you use your skills to help the world right now?
  • Your grandchildren are going to ask you about the role you played during this pandemic. What will you tell them?

Above all, help them see that this is not what they want or expect from life. It’s about what life is expecting from eat now. We expect them to rise to the occasion; be part of the solution, not part of the problem.

There are incredible urgent life lessons here. We are teaching our kids both directly and through our own example how to take responsibility—not just for ourselves and our immediate family, but for our local and global community, as well.
We are all being called to demonstrate our character and commitment to Others and to the greater good. Powołani są również nasi młodzi people. Let’s allow them to step up.

How to help teenagers to shelter?

Teenagers are not meant to be isolated. Here’s how to help your kids see the bigger picture during COVID-19.

Parents around the world are struggling to give their kids and students an “on-the-spot shelter”. Teens aren’t cut out for isolation, which makes COVID-19 especially difficult for them and makes it difficult to control.

How to cope with sheltering in place with your family

One of my friends comes off. “My kids bypass the rules and are with their friends every time I close my office door.” She m two college students home and a big corporate job she’s got to keep doing. She’s trying to care for elderly in-laws, and her daughter needs medication that she’s having trouble securing. “I feel I should be able to control them. I’m trying. But my anxiety is so heavy. I’m emotionally exhausted.”

Social isolation is difficult for people of all ages. But because teens and young adults are more in tune with social status than the rest of us, it’s even more depressing for them.

How to cope with sheltering in place with your family

Furthermore, their constant attunement to the welfare state makes them very touchy that they are treated like children. This means that they feel infantilized when ordered to take refuge there.

What can we do to encourage adolescents to adhere to social distancing measures?

We have to work with their existing motivations. Teens are unlikely to be convinced by (brilliant! Logicians! Passionate!) Arguments that contradict their innate and developmental motivations.

It starts with their motivation to get out of our control

We can work with this existing motivation by treating them as competent young adults, not small children. For example, we can:

  • Expect to make a significant contribution to our family. They can help you prepare meals and clean the house. Our children help with cleaning by vacuuming and cleaning work surfaces. Keeping conflict low in difficult conditions is a significant contribution. Planning fun activities for your family can be the most important contribution of all!
  • Let them manage themselves, their school work and other responsibilities without complaining or asking. This does not mean that we won’t be engaged with them. This means that we give them the space to act freely within the limits we agree as a family.
  • Ask them to help usourwork as much as possible. “My kids keep interrupting me when Zoom calls me about stupid things,” wrote a friend, completely frustrated. Anche gli adolescenti più grandi (e i coniugi!) hanno bisogno che siamo chiari su come il loro continuo disturbo ci colpisce. Explain rather than accuse: “I feel embarrassed and stressed when I’m on a video call, and you keep poking your head in to ask questions,” rather than “It is inconsiderate and selfish of you to keep interrupting my meetings.”
  • Use uncontrollable, non-directive language. For example, ask questions instead of telling them what to do. My all-time favorite question is “What’s your plan?” As in: “What’s your plan for getting some exercise today?” This clearly shows that they are still in control of their own behavior and helps them get in touch with their own motives and intentions.
  • Confirm it’s all thereso hard. Many students returning home from school now suffer significant losses. It is difficult to deal with their feelings of regret, anxiety, stress and isolation. And also: one of the great lessons of adulthood is that they can do difficult things.

Take advantage of their harmony with the social world

We can also draw on their high attunement to the social world by emphasizing how their lives have purpose, meaning and impact onOther people. Here are some discussion points:

  • You are not a passive actor here when it comes to running. Your actions are directly affecting the course of this crisis. We ask ourselves: what do you really care most about in this crisis?
  • Who can you help and who are you afraid of doing harm? How can you use your skills to help the world right now?
  • Your grandchildren are going to ask you about the role you played during this pandemic. What will you tell them?

Above all, help them see that this is not what they want or expect from life. It’s about what life is expecting from eat now. We expect them to rise to the occasion; be part of the solution, not part of the problem.

There are incredible urgent life lessons here. We are teaching our kids both directly and through our own example how to take responsibility—not just for ourselves and our immediate family, but for our local and global community, as well.
We are all being called to demonstrate our character and commitment to Others and to the greater good. Powołani są również nasi młodzi people. Let’s allow them to step up.

How to cope with sheltering in place with your family

Emergency meeting with children

Separation from one’s family during or after an emergency can have mental and physical effects on children. The sooner children connect with people they know and love, the better their results will be.

What is reunification?

Reunification is the process of ensuring that children are returned to their parents and family as quickly as possible following an emergency.

The vast majority of parents in the United States work outside the home. An estimated 69 million children in the United States receive school or parental care every day of the week. Sudden situations increase the likelihood of children separating from parents or legal guardians. During the evacuation or sheltering process, parents may find that they are at work and their children are in child care, school, a recreational facility, or Other location.

How to Reunite with Your Children

RodzOther plan awaryjny będzie zawierał ważne informacje, takie jak numery telefonów, kontakty alarmowe i wiele miejsc spotkań. Schools and day care centers will also have contingency plans to connect children with their loved ones after an emergency.

Until families reunite after a crisis, it’s important to stay up to date with emergency alerts and updates. I social media svolgeranno un ruolo chiave nel fornire informazioni e i bambini che utilizzano i social media possono utilizzare funzionalità come Facebook per far sapere ai propri cari che sono al sicuro.

It may be necessary to use additional reunification resources, such as the American Red Cross’ Reconnecting Families external icon program, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children’s external icon 24-hour hotline, or FEMA’s information page external icon for reunification systems.

Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children’s hotline for those events received over 34,000 calls. In addition, it took six months to reunite 5,192 missing children and their families. The worst storm in U. S. history forced more than 300,000 children to enroll in new schools around the country, sometimes very far from the communities they once knew.

As the National Commission on Children and Disasters, the Institute of Medicine, and Other experts have noted, children “are not simply small adults,” and emergency management planning and policies must address their unique needs.

Accidents or sudden emergencies can include:

The importance of planning

Emergency situations can happen anywhere, anytime. An estimated 69 million children attend school and childcare every day of the week, which can be particularly vulnerable because they are away from their families. Schools, childcare facilities, and families can help keep children safe through emergency preparedness plans.

For schools

Emergency incidents can occur during the school day. Educators and school administrators play an important role in helping children stay safe before, during and after an emergency. In addition to fire drills, many schools are organizing blockade drills in response to the growing number of school shootings. Also known as shelter-in-place or active shooting exercises, these exercises help students and staff practice staying safe in the event of a potential emergency such as an armed intruder.

The following are planning resources for schools:

  • Zombie Pandemic Toolkit for Middle School Teachers
  • School Crisis Guide external icon from the National Education Association includes resources for preparing for, reacting to, and responding to a crisis.

For childcare providers

Guardians play a key role in keeping children safe. This is especially true for emergency situations. It is important that caregivers prepare and are prepared to protect the children they care for. Many care facilities also use locking methods to protect children and adults in an emergency. These procedures vary by state.

The following are planning resources for childcare providers:

  • Tools, trainings, and Other resources external icon for Early Childcare Programs
  • Save outdoor children icon
  • American Academy of Pediatrics Provides Links to External Disaster Preparedness Standards Icon and More for Child Caregivers
  • Multihazard Planning for Childcare External Icon is a free, interactive online training provided by the Federal Agency for Emergency Management (FEMA)
  • Recommendations for Protecting Children in Childcare During Emergencies pdf icon [182 MB / 72 pages] external icon from the National Association of Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies and Save the Children
  • External icon for the United States General Services Administration’s Childhood Emergency Preparedness Toolkit
  • Emergency preparedness and blocking of childcare facilities: examples of regulations, procedures and licensing training pdf icon [272 KB / 15 pages] external icon from the Childhood and Family Administration

For families

It is important for children to know what to do in an emergency. Having a reunion plan with family members is an important part of any emergency preparedness plan. Ask all family members, including children, to help you prepare a contingency plan. Choose a meeting point. Prepare emergency contact cards that children can carry in their school bag or backpack. Help older children memorize important names and phone numbers (parents, Other trusted adult).

Parents and caretakers can learn about the school safety drills that are taking place in their child’s school or childcare facility from the school principal and safety officials. Since lockdown drills vary by state, you may also look on your state’s Department of Education external icon webpage.

The following are planning resources for families:

An example of how a family handles hospitalization orders on the spot

Andrea Johnson, 23, is a Maryland mother who has a daughter at home from Pre-K – at the same time juggling her college education and a full-time job.

STEVE INSKEEP, GUEST:

This week we were visiting families at home. And by visiting, of course, we mean calling from a safe distance. Andrea Johnson (ph) is 23 She works in human resources and is a student at the University of Maryland Global Campus. While we were talking, her daughter and her granddaughter were having a snack and talking about going from home to school.

PEYTON: We FaceTime our teacher.

ANDREA JOHNSON: You FaceTimed your teachers? Do you like?

LOLA: They asked us questions.

JOHNSON: They asked me how you are. Do you know what happens when we are home?

JOHNSON: You don’t know?

LOLA: Because of the coronavirus.

JOHNSON: Coronavirus, right.

RACHEL MARTIN, GUEST:

Her daughter Peyton (ph) turns 4 this weekend. Her niece Lola (ph) is 6 years old. Johnson balances her education with his: 6 classes this semester and a full-time job. Like anyone sharing an office space, she and her daughter rely on communication.

JOHNSON: If it’s not on my calendar, it doesn’t exist and you know it. So she’ll say hey mom, I want to go to McDonald’s and buy apple slices. I’ll literally have to put up a calendar to remember her request and then let her know if I can fulfill those requests or not.

INSKEEP: Johnson has to attend the meetings, as does his daughter because the kindergarten arranges daily phone calls with the teacher. They have learned to respect personal space.

JOHNSON: She told me herself – she said, Mommy, you and your colleagues are too loud, and I can’t hear. So sometimes she’ll be in the living room and I’ll be in the dining room where I can see her. But we’re still apart, and maybe I’ll put my headphones on and she’ll put the headphones on.

MARTIN: None of this is completely foreign to Johnson. His college classes are now remotely managed. And she was a kindergarten teacher for three years.

JOHNSON: But it’s quite challenging when you’re trying to teach your own child. For some strange reason, I had 25 students and they have never been as difficult as my only son.

INSKEEP: Johnson balances silence with rewards like s’mores or arts and crafts. Peyton and Lola seem to understand.

LOLA: Yes, she talks to a lot of people about her work.

JOHNSON: What do you do when I work?

LOLA: Well, we sit and eat and play together. For example, when she’s done working, we’ll get into arts and crafts and Peyton will do her hair.

INSKEEP: Do your hair – a good thing to do. Andrea Johnson with her daughter and granddaughter. At home, it combines parenting, work and school.

NPR transcripts are created urgently by NPR contractor Verb8tm, Inc. and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be final and may be updated or corrected in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

A message from Andrea Korsunsky, director of the Seniors At Home Center for Dementia Care

As we encounter disruption to our usual routine, it is important to adapt our approach as we connect with people who have dementia.

When interacting with our loved ones with dementia, the goal at all times is to support and maintain feelings of safety, security, and to find opportunities to instill joy.

How to cope with sheltering in place with your family

Dementia can make people feel insecure or insecure and have a hard time finding ways to be happy on their own. This means it’s up to their loved ones to support them in these areas. This is even more difficult during a time when we ourselves might feel worried or unsure about what the future holds.

Here are 5 quick tips for dealing with your quarantine.

Avoid turning on the news during times of day that are particularly difficult for your loved one.

For example, if your loved one experiences Sundowning Syndrome, engage in an activity in the early afternoon and avoid overstimulation and the news, which can cause sudden changes in mood or behavior.

Find Other ways to stay informed Other than the TV or radio.

Sign up for text alerts directly from your city or save the website for your local Department of Public Health so you can check status at specific times throughout the day without turning on the news where your loved one can hear.

Respond with reassuring words / phrases and state that there is a plan to keep everyone safe.

If your loved one is aware of the situation and is asking questions, reassure them that everything will be back to normal soon. Only talk about the news if your loved one asks and avoid introducing the topic if you know that it will cause feelings of worry or fear.

Get support for yourself.

Find an outlet for you to express your concerns, away from your loved one with dementia. It can help to talk to anOther family member or friend on the phone to stay connected and share concerns. Stay in contact with your counselor or therapist via phone if you have one.

Set aside dedicated time for meaningful interaction with your loved one.

Use this time of sheltering in place to find new ways to connect with your loved one. The ideas are: writing letters to loved ones, viewing photos, sorting out trash, reading your favorite book aloud (stories or poems are a good option). Be sure your approach in communication instills feelings of stability and safety.

It is important to maintain stability for your loved one while sheltering in place changes many aspects of our lives. This will help the demented person and you to cope with these uncertain times.

Seniors At Home is here to help. Call us to arrange a consultation, which could take place via videoconference while we take refuge on site. To learn more about how Seniors At Home can support you an older adult in your life, call 415.449.3700 or contact us online.

Dementia home care center for the elderly specializes in in-home support for people experiencing Alzheimer’s or Other forms of dementia, as well as practical and emotional assistance for families.