How to cook hake

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How to cook hake

Cooking hake fillets may be done in several ways. Baking, sautéing, frying, and grilling are all acceptable ways to prepare this versatile fish. It also blends well with a number of flavors, from subtle and savory to acidic and spicy. Though these fillets are incredibly flexible, one must take care not to over-season them and to cook them to just the right consistency. This soft, mild fish can easily be overpowered by strong flavors and becomes chewy and dry when overcooked.

Pan-frying and sautéing are two of the most popular ways to cook hake fillets. Butter, margarine, olive oil, and other frying fats quickly carry flavor and heat into the fish, acting as a kind of marinade. One should start by heating the cooking fat over medium heat, then add any flavorings. The flavorings will infuse the fat with taste, which will then travel into the hake fish, which is added last.

Fried onions and garlic, lemon juice, olives, capers, and spicy pepper flakes are all popular flavorings to add to hake fish. Onions and garlic must be sautéed until soft and brown, but salty, spicy, and acidic flavorings only need a minute or two in the pan before the cook adds the fish. When the hake fillet is fully cooked, it should be golden brown on the outside, white on the inside — moist, flaky and tender. Hake sautéed in a lot of herbs may take on a hard crust but this isn’t a problem, as long as the inside of the fish is fully cooked.

Baking and grilling hake fillets can be tricky when it comes to adding flavor and achieving perfect heating. Marinades work very well with hake because they boost the fish’s mild flavor while infusing it with moisture. Acidic marinades, like lemon and garlic or tomato and herbs, sink deeply into the white flesh and help keep it tender. Spicy-sweet marinades, like Cajun honey and lime, usually also compliment the hake’s flavor.

When baking hake, preheat the oven to about 350°F (180°C) and bake for only about 10 minutes. Any longer may make the fillets rubbery and difficult to cut and chew. Adding a little water to the baking dish and tenting it with some aluminum foil may create steam that can keep the hake moist. The fish may need an additional two or three minutes baking time, in this case.

Grilling hake fillets takes virtually no time at all, especially if the grill is very hot. When the cook first lays the fish on the grill, it may stick and fuse to the grate, this is expected. As the fish cooks through fully on that side, it will caramelize and release from the grate. The cook may then flip the hake, and repeat the process. The hake fillets should only need two to three minutes grilling on each side.

Is it better to bake or pan fry fish?

Some studies have shown that baking fish causes less loss of omega-3 fatty acids than both frying and microwaving (39, 46, 47 ). Baking may also be a better way to retain the vitamin D content of fish.

Is hake a good fish?

Hake fish is one of the finest sources of essential fatty acids, protein, minerals and fat-soluble vitamins like vitamin A, E and D. It is non-oily, deep water fish, and therefore, low in calories and saturated fats; 100 g holds just 78 calories in comparison to 91 calories in halibut.

How do you eat hake?

There are numerous ways to cook hake fillets. Popular options are pan-frying in a little lemon juice and butter, braising with herbs and aromatics or poaching in fish stock, wine and lemon juice. They can be steamed or roasted too.

How does hake fish taste?

Although taste & texture do vary by species, Hake tend to have a very mild taste, with slightly sweet meat and cream -colored to slightly-pink flesh which has a somewhat coarse, watery texture. They have a similar flavor as Cod, but with a milder taste, a softer texture, and a smaller flake.

Is it better to bake or pan fry salmon?

I would just bake it, but that’s just me. It’s wonderful both ways, but for optimal tender, flaky moistness, brush filets with a little olive oil, salt and pepper, and bake until just slightly under-done and let rest under foil to finish cooking. It really doesn’t take long to cook it fully in the pan.

What should I Season fish with?

Here Are Some Popular Seasoning Combinations For Fish Lemon zest, rosemary, thyme, and garlic. Capers, olives, lemon, and garlic. Breadcrumbs, parmesan cheese, dried Italian herbs. Orange zest, garlic, and thyme marinade. Dijon mustard and garlic. Soy sauce, dijon mustard, and chile flakes.

Is hake a cheap fish?

Hake is a versatile and inexpensive alternative to cod. The soft and moist fish can be baked, battered and fried, or used in soups and stews. Or try grilling or broiling it and serving it whole. In Spain and Portugal, hake is one of the most popular types of fish and is considered to be the best of the cod family.

What is another name for hake fish?

– Merluccius bilinearis from the western North Atlantic, where it is called hake or whiting. Figure 2. -Urophycis regius, a common fish of the U.S. east coast, where it is known as spotted hake.

What’s the worst fish you can eat?

6 Fish to Avoid Bluefin Tuna. In December 2009, the World Wildlife Fund put the bluefin tuna on its “10 for 2010” list of threatened species, alongside the giant panda, tigers, and leatherback turtles. Chilean Sea Bass (aka Patagonian Toothfish) Grouper. Monkfish. Orange Roughy. Salmon (farmed)

Does hake have bones?

Hake fillets need little preparation but it is worth checking for bones.

What does hake look like?

Hake is quite a mild fish, with a white flaky texture and a flavour that is more subtle than that of cod. The fish has a soft, iron-grey skin and silvery belly. The flesh when raw is naturally very soft, but when cooked it becomes firm and meaty.

Is hake fish high in mercury?

King mackerel: 0.730 ppm. Bigeye tuna: 0.689 ppm. Hake: 0.079 ppm. Trout: 0.071 ppm.

Where is hake caught?

Hake are mostly found in the Southwest Atlantic (Argentina and Uruguay), Southeast Pacific (Chile and Peru), Southeast Atlantic (Namibia and South Africa), Southwest Pacific (New Zealand), and Mediterranean and Black Sea (Italy, Portugal, Spain, Greece and France).

Is hake fillet healthy?

Hake provides phosphorus, potassium and selenium in significant quantities. So hake has at least four unquestionable benefits for a healthy diet; It is low in fat, low in calories, a source of high-value protein and a singnificant content of vitamins and minerals.

Is hake a flat fish?

Description: Hake has an elongate body that may reach up to 1.3 m in length. Habitat: The Hake is a demersal species that is usually found between 70-350 m. May be observed feeding alone on the bottom or in shoals in the water column.

How to cook hake

The soft and moist fish can be baked, battered and fried, or used in soups and stews.

Have you ever seen the name of a fish at the seafood market or on a restaurant menu and you aren’t quite sure what it is? Well, chances are it might have been hake. Hake is a lean white fish that is part of the cod family. Its mild flavor and delicate texture make it a popular seafood choice in the United States and Europe.

Red hake and whiting (silver hake) are common kinds of hake. The fillets are smaller than cod, but the texture is similar. Hake is a versatile and inexpensive alternative to cod. The soft and moist fish can be baked, battered and fried, or used in soups and stews. Or try grilling or broiling it and serving it whole.

In Spain and Portugal, hake is one of the most popular types of fish and is considered to be the best of the cod family. Some popular dishes include braised hake with garlic and a hint of spicy paprika, Madrid-style shrimp-stuffed hake, and hake with saffron and oranges. Scandinavian fish balls, or Fiskeboller, are a popular dish often made from hake. If you can’t find it here in the states, some substitutions include: cod, flounder, haddock, pollock, or halibut.

There are many fish in the sea, so to speak. Try out a new variety and it might become a new favorite dinner staple.

Emily Jacobs is the Recipe editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @EmilyRecipes.

How to cook hake

How to cook hake

How to cook hake

Are you ready to try something new for dinner? This very best fish recipe ever is bursting with savory flavors and is foolproof. Wow your family tonight!

I was always intimidated by fish until I stumbled upon this amazing recipe, and I have been meaning to share it for ages. I got the original version from my dear friend Jenny during a mom’s night out recipe swap back when we both lived in Seattle. We were so chatty that night that I only ended up writing down two recipes, but this was one of them.

In the years since I have tweaked it just a bit. It is one of my family’s very favorite meals and it is also a fantastic—and super easy—dish to serve guests; provided they eat seafood.

The really great thing about this recipe is that it works with pretty much any type of fish or seafood. The original recipe called for halibut, which I love but it’s very hard to get here in Florida. I have used tilapia, mahi-mahi, salmon, flounder, cod, & shrimp with this recipe, and they have all turned out wonderful. Another easy fish recipe that has become a family favorite during the warmer months is this Fish Taco recipe .

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How to cook hake

If you are following a low carb lifestyle or a ketogenic or “keto” diet, this recipe fits perfectly into those eating plans as well!

Ingredients:

Here is what you need:

Directions:

Step 1: Pre-heat the oven broiler; Grease 9×13″ baking dish with a thin coat of butter. *PLEASE make sure your baking dish is safe for use in the broiler.*

How to cook hake

Step 2: Mix together Parmesan cheese, butter, mayo, lemon juice, green onion, salt, pepper, dill, & Tabasco in a small bowl until well blended.

How to cook hake

Step 3: Arrange fish in a single layer in a baking dish.

How to cook hake

Step 4: Broil fish for 8 minutes or until it flakes with a fork.

How to cook hake

Step 5: Remove from oven and carefully spread the Parmesan mixture over top.

How to cook hake

Step 6: Broil 2 additional minutes, or until bubbly and lightly browned. *PLEASE make sure your baking dish is safe for use in the broiler.*

Have you tried this recipe? Let us know in the comments below what you think!

Nutritional value: High in protein

Pan-frying You can choose to fry your fish as is or cover it in flour or breadcrumbs. Using the extra coating will give your fish more texture and body. If you’re going to dip it in flour, soak the fish in a bowl of milk for 3 to 5 minutes, before covering it in flour or breadcrumbs. This will help the coating stick to the fish.

Get your pan ready for frying by pouring a few tablespoons of vegetable oil into it. You can also use clarified butter which will taste great on the fish. Heat the pan until the oil slides around easily. You can splatter a few drops of water in the pan – if the water sizzles, it’s ready for your fish. Place the fish flesh side down in the pan – the side you’ll be presenting to your diner (the non-skin side).

Once your fish is in the pan, slide a spatula gently underneath to prevent it from sticking. Cook the fish for 3 to 4 minutes on one side and then flip it. Fish usually cooks for 10 minutes per inch of thickness. Use a wide spatula to prevent breaking the fish. Cook for another 3-4 minutes or until the flesh turns pearly white and flakes easily with a fork. Carefully lift it out of the pan and serve immediately.

Grilling Grilling fish gives you a great advantage as you have complete control over the temperature. Always coat your fish with oil or fat to prevent sticking. As you’re heating your grill, cover the grate loosely with aluminium foil. The intense heat will cause any residue to dissolve, starting the cleaning process for you. This also minimizes sticking.

Blast the heat to 288°C. Remove the aluminium foil. Using a grill brush, scrape the grate clean. Fold a few sheets of paper towels into a small pad, dip them in oil using tongs and rub over the bars of the grate until it looks glossy. Choose fillets that are thick and sturdy for grilling and can stand up to the intense heat of a live fire. Cut your fish into portions that have an even thickness to ensure you don’t have any dry or undercooked parts.

Coat your fish with some olive oil, salt and pepper and place it skin-side down and diagonally on the grill. This makes it easier to flip the fish as it’s lying on an angle. The fish will take 8 minutes to cook through per inch of thickness, taking about 3-5 minutes per side. Reduce the heat to medium, cover the grill and let it cook. When cooked properly, the meat will be firm to the touch, flake easily with a fork and appear opaque all the way through.

Hake on wholewheat couscous

  • 4 x 150g hake fillets
  • flour for dusting
  • sunflower oil for frying
  • sea salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper

Dressing

  • ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed juice of
  • 1 lemon
  • 10 cherry tomatoes, finely chopped
  • 4 large green olives, pitted and finely chopped
  • To serve
  • Wholewheat couscous, cooked according to packet instructions, Wilted baby spinach

Wholewheat couscous, cooked according to packet instructions, Wilted baby spinach

Method

  1. Mix together the dressing ingredients and set aside.
  2. Dust the fish with a little flour and season well.
  3. Heat some oil in a pan. Cook the fish over medium-high heat for a few minutes per side or until golden and just cooked through.
  4. Spoon some couscous onto each plate, top with a piece of fish, spoon over plenty of the dressing and serve immediately with some wilted baby spinach.

Cook’s note

This is also lovely with steamed hake (steam for 10 minutes). You could also omit the olives and add a few torn basil leaves to the tomato dressing.

*Recipe provided courtesy of Fairlady magazine.

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If you’re looking to incorporate new types of fish into your family’s diet, look no further than the hake, an ocean fish related to the cod and the whiting. This fish isn’t well known in the United States, but it is a much sought-after fish in parts of Europe, particularly Spain and Portugal. Hake can be poached, roasted, sauteed or broiled. The traditional Spanish way to prepare hake remains the best-known: pan-fried in a light coating of flour.

Selecting

Hake are difficult to find because they are not common in the United States. In addition, they are over-fished in many parts of the world. If you do find hake, look for a fish with clear eyes and with the scales firmly attached to the skin. If you are purchasing fillets, don’t be put off by their soft texture. Hake have a very soft flesh that does not firm up until after you cook them. Instead, look for hake with white flesh that is almost odorless. Hake that have cloudy eyes, missing scales or a strong fish odor may be old.

Pan-Frying

Dredge the skinless, raw hake fillets in flour and pan-fry them over medium-high heat in olive oil until the flour coating is light brown. Hake is not typically pan-fried until it is very crispy or dark brown. You will know when the hake is ready when the fillets have a firm texture and are opaque and flaky in the middle. You may have to lightly cut into one to check, particularly if it is a thick fillet.

Serving Suggestions

To prepare hake the Spanish way, saute chopped garlic cloves with the olive oil and add white wine near the end of the frying time. Then, top the hake with cooked peas and asparagus. Pan-fried hake also pairs well with salsa verde, paprika, lemon, tartar sauce or ranch dressing. The hake fillets have a mild cod-like flavor and texture when they are cooked, so they go well with any sides that you might serve with cod, such as sauteed vegetables or french fries. You can also serving these kid-friendly fish fillets with a simple tossed salad topped with a creamy dressing.

If you prefer a healthier meal, omit the flour or use a whole wheat flour instead. The flour is used mainly for texture when you pan-fry hake, so it isn’t necessary. The olive oil contains fat, but it is low in saturated fat, which is the bad fat that can raise cholesterol. Adjust the side dish to reduce the fat as well. Prepare steamed vegetables instead of sauteed vegetables or fried potatoes as a side. Use a light creamy dressing on the salad.

Nutritional value: High in protein

Pan-frying You can choose to fry your fish as is or cover it in flour or breadcrumbs. Using the extra coating will give your fish more texture and body. If you’re going to dip it in flour, soak the fish in a bowl of milk for 3 to 5 minutes, before covering it in flour or breadcrumbs. This will help the coating stick to the fish.

Get your pan ready for frying by pouring a few tablespoons of vegetable oil into it. You can also use clarified butter which will taste great on the fish. Heat the pan until the oil slides around easily. You can splatter a few drops of water in the pan – if the water sizzles, it’s ready for your fish. Place the fish flesh side down in the pan – the side you’ll be presenting to your diner (the non-skin side).

Once your fish is in the pan, slide a spatula gently underneath to prevent it from sticking. Cook the fish for 3 to 4 minutes on one side and then flip it. Fish usually cooks for 10 minutes per inch of thickness. Use a wide spatula to prevent breaking the fish. Cook for another 3-4 minutes or until the flesh turns pearly white and flakes easily with a fork. Carefully lift it out of the pan and serve immediately.

Grilling Grilling fish gives you a great advantage as you have complete control over the temperature. Always coat your fish with oil or fat to prevent sticking. As you’re heating your grill, cover the grate loosely with aluminium foil. The intense heat will cause any residue to dissolve, starting the cleaning process for you. This also minimizes sticking.

Blast the heat to 288°C. Remove the aluminium foil. Using a grill brush, scrape the grate clean. Fold a few sheets of paper towels into a small pad, dip them in oil using tongs and rub over the bars of the grate until it looks glossy. Choose fillets that are thick and sturdy for grilling and can stand up to the intense heat of a live fire. Cut your fish into portions that have an even thickness to ensure you don’t have any dry or undercooked parts.

Coat your fish with some olive oil, salt and pepper and place it skin-side down and diagonally on the grill. This makes it easier to flip the fish as it’s lying on an angle. The fish will take 8 minutes to cook through per inch of thickness, taking about 3-5 minutes per side. Reduce the heat to medium, cover the grill and let it cook. When cooked properly, the meat will be firm to the touch, flake easily with a fork and appear opaque all the way through.

Hake on wholewheat couscous

  • 4 x 150g hake fillets
  • flour for dusting
  • sunflower oil for frying
  • sea salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper

Dressing

  • ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed juice of
  • 1 lemon
  • 10 cherry tomatoes, finely chopped
  • 4 large green olives, pitted and finely chopped
  • To serve
  • Wholewheat couscous, cooked according to packet instructions, Wilted baby spinach

Wholewheat couscous, cooked according to packet instructions, Wilted baby spinach

Method

  1. Mix together the dressing ingredients and set aside.
  2. Dust the fish with a little flour and season well.
  3. Heat some oil in a pan. Cook the fish over medium-high heat for a few minutes per side or until golden and just cooked through.
  4. Spoon some couscous onto each plate, top with a piece of fish, spoon over plenty of the dressing and serve immediately with some wilted baby spinach.

Cook’s note

This is also lovely with steamed hake (steam for 10 minutes). You could also omit the olives and add a few torn basil leaves to the tomato dressing.

*Recipe provided courtesy of Fairlady magazine.

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You could consider hake an “everyfish.” You know, the type of mild, white-fleshed variety you can do just about anything with – grilling, frying, roasting, steaming; you name it. A bit more mild than cod and quite flaky, hake pairs well with just about any side dish and gives you a lot of latitude for creativity and style.

Tomatoes, capers, onions and herbs, for example, make unctuous complementary ingredients to cook with hake fillets. If you want to go “dry,” you can do that too. A little extra olive oil and you can re-create the taste and texture of pan-fried hake while you utilize the remaining oven space for matching sides like garlic roasted broccoli, oven-baked asparagus “fries,” and crispy salt and vinegar “chips” made with fingerling potatoes. Start with the basic hake-bake technique:

Prepare: Hake fillets don’t require any prep work themselves, other than patting them dry and seasoning them to taste with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper (or your spices of choice). Also, if you buy a whole hake fillet (they weigh about 1 pound), you might want to cut it into halves or fourths to make serving easier.

If you plan to bake the hake with complementary ingredients, such as onions and capers, cut, slice and dice the ingredients as needed. Heat the oven to 375F, and brush the hake with olive oil or melted butter.

Place a few sliced onion or lemons (at least 1/4-inch thick) in the bottom of the baking dish; this elevates the fillets and contributes to better browning. After you arrange the fillets on the sliced onions or lemons, add the secondary ingredients around them. Crushed tomatoes, thinly sliced onions or shallots, minced garlic and basil make a classic combination to get you started.

Set the dish on the center rack and let the oven do its thing. A 3/4- to 1-inch-thick hake fillet takes about 15 to 20 minutes to roast, uncovered. When ready, the temperature of center of the fillet will be 145F, and its flesh will flake easily.

Squeeze a little fresh lemon juice over the fillets and spoon some of the side ingredients over the top. Garnish with freshly chopped parsley, if desired.