How to cook corn

The sweet crunch of fresh corn is truly a seasonal event. Since corn’s sweetness quickly and steadily turns to bland starchiness every minute it’s off the stalk, freshly picked locally grown corn is the best bet for great corn flavor. Find delicious new ways for preparing ears of corn (or tips for making the most of your old favorites) below.

How to Boil Corn

Simala Kama / Getty Images

A simple boiled ear of corn is a delight of summer. Bring a pot of water to a boil (check that the pot is big enough to hold all the ears of corn). Add shucked ears of corn, cover, and turn off the heat. Let sit at least a minute, at which point the raw corn will be warm. After two minutes the corn will be hot and starting to get tender. After four minutes you'll have more fully cooked corn on the cob. Since the heat is off, you can let the corn sit longer if the timing of other dishes requires it in order to serve the corn piping hot.

Note: Do not salt the water; it will toughen the corn.

Lift corn out of the water and set on a clean kitchen towel to drain. Serve immediately with butter, salt, and pepper for people to add to taste.

How to Steam Corn

How to cook corn

​The Spruce / Julia Estrada

Many people prefer to crisper texture corn maintains when steamed instead of boiled. In a large pot bring about an inch of water to a boil. Set a steamer in or a plate on top of an upside-down bowl that leaves at least an inch open around the edges in the pot. Set shucked ears of corn in the steamer or on the bowl, cover, and cook until corn is hot and as tender as you like it, about 3 minutes for very crisp and 5 minutes for more tender ears.

Serve immediately with plenty of butter, salt, and pepper. A spritz of lime juice or a sprinkle of chili powder can also be delicious.

You also can fry corn in a skillet.

How to Grill Corn

How to cook corn

Anita Schecter/The Spruce

Grilling adds a great charred edge to the sweetness of corn on the cob. You can grill corn in the husk—as long as you open it up first and pull out the corn silk—but you end up with something more like corn steamed inside the husk, which is also delicious. You also can shuck the corn, brush it with melted butter, and set it on a medium-hot grill (you can hold your hand about an inch above the cooking grate for 3 to 4 seconds) until charred and tender, about 15 minutes.

Once grilled, the corn can be eaten plain, slathered with butter, spritzed with lime juice, or cut and then tossed into a spicy grilled corn salad.

How to Use Raw Corn

How to cook corn

Raw corn, as long as the kernels come from freshly picked ears and are sweet and tender, is delicious. First, cut the kernels from the cob, then toss them with other fresh summer produce (tomatoes and basil, pictured here, are particularly delicious) for an easy, sweet, crunchy salad.

How to Make Corn Soup

How to cook corn

Harald Walker / Getty Images

Like so many vegetable soups, there are two main options: smooth (like sweet corn soup) or chunky (like corn chowder). In either case, you’ll need to cut the kernels off of the cobs. Add to the corn flavor of any corn soup by then making corn broth (boil the stripped corn cobs in water with a bit of salt; you can add onion, garlic, or herbs, if you like, for more flavor; simmer for 30 minutes to an hour; let it sit to coll, and strain) and using that as the liquid for the soup.

Add Corn to Baked Goods

How to cook corn

The Spruce / Diana Chistruga

Corn kernels add crunch and sweetness (not to mention a bit of nutty flavor) to doughs and batters of all kinds. Cutting the kernels from the cobs is, obviously, the first step. Then you can add the kernels to corn fritters (pictured) or corn soufflé. Or whirl those kernels in a blender or food processor to add moisture to the mix and even more sweetness, as in a corn cake or corn pancakes.

Savor a sweet taste of summer, whether you prefer to cook corn on the grill, in the oven, or even with an Instant Pot.

Every winter and spring, we dream about biting into that first ear of tender, sweet, buttery corn. Seeing stacks of fresh corn at the farmers' market or grocery store is when we know it's finally, officially summer and we'll be feasting on corn all season long.

You're probably well aware that there are thousands of delicious corn recipes, but are you also privy to the fact that there's a different tasty method for how to cook corn for each day of the week? Yep, we have seven easy, test kitchen-approved ways to cook corn, plus we're sharing tasty recipe ideas for each strategy. Study up so you can keep your menu as fresh as those kernels.

How to Cook Corn 7 Easy Ways

Stock up on plenty of napkins and maybe a set of these handy OXO Good Grips Interlocking Corn Holders ($9.99 for eight pairs, Amazon). You're going to need them as you sample your way through all these scrumptious styles for how to cook corn.

How to Grill Corn

Preheat a gas or charcoal grill to high heat, or between 400 degrees and 450 degrees F. Then you can choose your own adventure: Either remove the husk or keep it on, either way works. If you choose to shuck the corn prior to cooking, brush it with melted butter or olive oil, then season with salt. Place the corn on the grill and close the lid. Cook for about 8 to 12 minutes, turning every two minutes or so until all sides are golden or charred, depending on your doneness preference.

How to Boil Corn

Fill a large pot two-thirds full with water, stir in 1/2 tablespoon of salt, and bring this to a boil on the stove. Remove the husks and silks from one to four ears of corn. (Boil any additional ears in batches of up to four so you don't overcrowd the pot.) Gently place the corn in the boiling water and cook for about 5 to 7 minutes. Using a set of tongs (we love these KitchenAid Stainless Steel Silicone-Tipped Tongs; $12.99, Target), carefully remove the corn from the pot and allow them to drain on a paper towel-lined plate. Garnish as desired and enjoy.

How to Bake Corn

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. if you plan to roast the corn in the husk, remove any dry leaves and any silks or tassels that stick out of the husk, as these may burn if you leave them on. Place the cobs in a single layer on the oven rack, and bake for 30 minutes. Using a set of tongs, carefully remove the corn from the oven. Allow to cool enough to handle, pull back the husks and dress your kernels as desired.

Alternatively, you can remove the husks and the silks prior to baking. Place the shucked ears in a single layer on the oven rack, and bake for 20 minutes. Using a set of tongs, carefully remove the corn from the oven and top as you like.

To infuse the corn with flavor, you can also bake shucked corn in foil. Remove the husks and the silks, then wrap each ear separately in foil, adding butter, spices, and/or herbs if desired. Place the ears in a single layer on the oven rack, and bake for 20 minutes. Using a set of tongs, carefully remove the corn from the oven. Allow to cool enough to handle, then remove the foil wrapper and dig in.

How to Slow Cook Corn

Remove the husks and silks from four to six ears of corn. Top each ear with 1 teaspoon butter (or up the ante with compound butter) then wrap each ear of corn in foil. Place the wrapped corn in a 6-quart oval slow cooker and close the lid. Slow cook on high for 2 hours or low for 4 hours.

How to Cook Corn in an Instant Pot

Remove the husks and silks from four to six ears of corn, then cut the cobs in half. Place the trivet insert inside the Instant Pot, then stack the corn cob halves on top. Close the lid and cook on high for 5 minutes. Quick release the pressure, carefully remove the corn and garnish as you like.

Make quick work out of dinner side dish prep with this Instant Pot® Old Bay® Corn on the Cob. Or consider this classic Instant Pot® Corn on the Cob, which is ideal for peak-season sweet corn.

How to Microwave Corn

Remove the husks and silks from one to four ears of corn, and wrap each ear in a damp paper towel or heat-safe plastic wrap. Place the corn in a single layer on a microwave-safe plate, then cook in the microwave on 100% power for 3 to 5 minutes for a single ear, 5 to 7 minutes for two ears, or 9 to 12 minutes for three or four ears, flipping halfway. Use kitchen mitts (like Gorilla Grip Premium Silicone Slip-Resistant Oven Mitt Set; $19.99, Amazon) or thick kitchen towel to carefully remove the corn from the microwave, then allow the corn to cool slightly before unwrapping, garnishing, and serving.

This ultra easy Microwave Corn on the Cob has more than 380 five-star reviews.

How to Sauté Corn

For an easy-to-eat option, consider sautéed corn. Remove the husks and silks from up to four ears of corn. (Here's exactly how to cut corn off the cob without making a mess!) In a medium skillet over medium heat, melt 1 teaspoon of butter per cob. Once the butter is melted, add the corn kernels and season with salt, pepper, and any additional dried herbs or spices. Sauté for 8 to 10 minutes, adding any additional fresh herbs or cheese just before serving.

You'll feel like you're on a vacation south of the border with this quick sautéed Skillet Elote. 

The Best Ways to Use Cooked Corn

Now that you're a pro at all the options for how to cook corn, we highly recommend you add these creative corn ideas to your summer recipe repertoire:

It isn’t summer until you’ve had corn on the cob. It’s at every barbecue, it makes the perfect side dish to, umm, everything, and unless you’re Michael Bublé, no one judges you while gobbling one down with both hands. Luckily, the summer staple is quick and easy and doesn’t even need fussy toppings (unless you want them — we have so many fun ideas for how to top corn). Just a pat of butter and a generous seasoning of salt and pepper.

1. Boil in VERY salty water.

Use the largest pot you have, fill it with water, and salt it really well. One of the first lessons I remember at culinary school was my chef calling all of us over and having us taste a spoonful of his pot of salted water. It tasted like the ocean and he proudly stated that every single pot of salted water we use for boiling ANYTHING should taste like that. So don’t be shy. Your corn won’t taste salty in the end — the salt will just help bring out its flavor. Bring your nicely salted water to a boil.

2. Shuck it good.

While your water is heating up, pull off your corn husks. This can get messy thanks to all the tiny strings, so we recommend doing it over a trash can. Starting at the tip, grab all of the husk and as much of the strings as possible and rip down. Repeat until all of the husk is off. Rub off as much of the lingering strings as possible. (You’ll often see that a hack for removing the strings is to use a clean toothbrush — we don’t buy it.)

3. Boil ’em quick.

How long to boil corn is the biggest issue here. There aren’t great indicators for when it’s done, but they will look a little plumper and will be soft and juicy. Using tongs, drop your corn into the boiling water. Return the water to a boil, then cook your corn for 5 minutes. Set a timer because if you let your corn overcook the kernels can become tough. The goal is juicy, crunchy kernels, not mushy dry ones.

4. Butter it up.

Brush with melted butter, season with salt and pepper, and let summer begin.

Have you tried this method yet? Let us know what you think in the comments below!

How to cook corn

Find just-for-you recipes, save favorites and more when you customize your Flavor Profile.

Already have an account? Login.

How to cook corn

How to cook corn

How to cook corn

How to cook corn

How to cook corn

How to cook corn

This spice has now been added to your Flavor Profile, under “My Spices”.

No spam ever! Read our privacy policy

Are you out of McCormick ?</p> <p>Are you sure you want to remove</p> <h4>Own this spice?</h4> <p>Set up your Flavor Profile or log in to:</p> <ul> <li>Add this spice to “My Spices”</li> <li>Create a more personalized experience</li> <li>Manage your spices in Flavor Profile</li> </ul> <p>No spam ever! Read our privacy policy </p> <p>Sign up to save your favorite flavors.</p> <p>No spam ever! Read our privacy policy </p> <p>DON’T HAVE AN ACCOUNT? REGISTER TODAY</p> <p>Already have an account? login </p> <p>Already have an account? login </p> <h3>Social Media</h3> <p>Because we are constantly improving our products, we encourage you to read the ingredient statement on our packages at the time of your purchase.</p> <h2>Three easy methods for making the most of your summer corn.</h2> <p><img src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/how-cook-fresh-F07F.png" alt="How to cook corn" title="How to cook corn" class=""/></p> <p>Fresh, delicious corn on the cob is a classic summer side. It pairs wonderfully with burgers, ribs, BBQ, and is fantastic for a fun summer cookout, or back yard barbecue. Fresh corn—when prepped and prepared at its freshest—will render crisp, sweet kernels that will make everyone come back for seconds!</p> <p>Fromg boiling to grilling, here are three great ways to cook this delicious summer veggie, as well as tips and tricks for preparation. </p> <h3>get the Food.com app.</h3> <p>Watch on your iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Android, Roku, or Fire TV.</p> <h3>1 Removing the Husk</h3> <p><img src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/how-cook-fresh-DAFDC19.png" alt="How to cook corn" title="How to cook corn" class=""/></p> <p>Starting at the top of the cob, pull back as much silk and husk as possible. Pull all the way to the bottom of the stem, until all of the husks are at the end of the cob. </p> <h3>2 Break Off Cob Stem and Husks</h3> <p><img src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/how-cook-fresh-76779.png" alt="How to cook corn" title="How to cook corn" class=""/></p> <p>Once you’ve pulled all of the husk and silk to the bottom of the cob, firmly break off the cob stem. The husks and stem will immediately come off in one piece. Discard all husk, silk and stems. </p> <h3>3 Remove Any Remaining Silk</h3> <p><img src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/how-cook-fresh-8A465E2.png" alt="How to cook corn" title="How to cook corn" class=""/></p> <p>Pull off any remaining corn silk. It is helpful to run the cob under cold water, and gently pull off any remaining strands that are stuck between the kernels. </p> <h3>4 Trim Tips of Cobs if Necessary</h3> <p><img src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/how-cook-fresh-7807D.png" alt="How to cook corn" title="How to cook corn" class=""/></p> <p>If the corn cobs have brown or discolored tips, use a serrated knife to remove the discolored kernels. If there is no browning or discoloration, the corn can be cooked as-is, with no trimming necessary. Rinse the corn, and gently pat dry with paper towels. The corn is now ready to cook. </p> <h3>5 Cooking Method #1: Boiled Corn</h3> <p><img src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/how-cook-fresh-D7B70.png" alt="How to cook corn" title="How to cook corn" class=""/></p> <p>Boiling corn on the cob is the most traditional cooking method. It is very simple and requires just a couple steps. First, fill a large stockpot two-thirds full of water. Add a couple teaspoons of salt, and 3-6 cobs of corn. Heat the pot over medium-high heat and bring to a boil. Boil corn, uncovered, for 10-12 minutes. </p> <p><img src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/how-cook-fresh-BD09.png" alt="How to cook corn" title="How to cook corn" class=""/></p> <p>Once the corn is done cooking, the kernels will become bright yellow. Transfer the cobs to a serving plate. They will be very hot, so let them cool slightly for 5-10 minutes before serving. </p> <h3>6 Cooking Method #2: Slow Cooker-Steamed Corn</h3> <p><img src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/how-cook-fresh-2225.png" alt="How to cook corn" title="How to cook corn" class=""/></p> <p>Using a slow cooker to steam fresh corn is a wonderfully simple, convenient and hands-off cooking method. This is especially true when preparing the corn for a party, cookout or any other get-together.</p> <p>Start by adding 3-6 prepped cobs of corn to a slow cooker. Add 4 cups of water to the bottom of the slow cooker. Set slow cooker to the high heat setting. Once water begins to simmer, set a timer for 15 minutes. </p> <p><img src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/how-cook-fresh-0F278A.png" alt="How to cook corn" title="How to cook corn" class=""/></p> <p>After steaming for 15 minutes, remove the cobs from the slow cooker, and serve right away. Corn can also be kept warm in the slow cooker for serving at a party. Be sure to turn off the heat to prevent over-cooking. </p> <p><img src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/how-boil-corn-6FF69.png" alt="How to cook corn" title="How to cook corn" class=""/></p> <p>Bring a large pot of water to a boil and add the corn. Cook| stirring occasionally to make sure the corn is submerged| for <b>3 to 5 minutes</b>| or until the corn is tender and bright yellow.</p> <h2>How do u boil corn?</h2> <p>Water. Okay next we need to bring the water back to a boil. The water came back to a boil. And I’m</p> <p><iframe loading="lazy" width="800" height="360" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Z3ksO2mOxko?start=76&cc_load_policy=1&rel=0&modestbranding=0&showinfo=0&playsinline=1&enablejsapi=1&fs=1"></iframe></p> <h2>How long is too long to boil corn on the cob?</h2> <p>The answer to how long to boil ears of corn is a general rule of <b>three to five minutes</b>. You want to shuck the corn and remove the husks first| however. The fresher the corn| the shorter amount of time you boil the corn because really fresh corn just needs a quick drop in boiling water.</p> <h2>Which is the best way to cook corn?</h2> <ol> <li>Add enough water to a large pot to cover the corn.</li> <li>Bring water to a boil.</li> <li>Remove the husk and the silk from each ear of corn.</li> <li>Once the water is boiling| carefully add the corn to a pot. Cover and reduce heat to medium.</li> <li>Cook until the kernels are tender| 6 to 8 minutes. Immediately serve corn.</li> </ol> <h2>What to add to corn to make it taste better?</h2> <p>To really add flavor| use <b>broth</b> instead of water. PRO TIP: Bringing out the corns natural flavor only requires butter| salt| pepper and sugar BUT if you REALLY want to add a lot of flavor add just a pinch of cayenne and 1/2 tsp of lemon juice. It’ll make your mouth happy!</p> <h2>How do you know when corn is boiled?</h2> <p>How do you know when boiled corn on the cob is done? When the corn on the cob is <b>fully cooked the yellow color of the corn is more intense</b>. The kernels are plumper and more tender. You can test it by pricking a kernel with the tip of a sharp knife.</p> <h2>Do you boil corn with the lid on?</h2> <p>Once your pot of water is boiling| <b>add the cobs</b>. Cover the pan and let the water return to a boil. Pro tip: Never boil your corn in salted water! It can make the kernels very tough.</p> <h2>Do you add salt when boiling corn?</h2> <p>Cover pot and bring cold unsalted water just to a boil on high heat. Some people like to add a little sugar to the boiling water| but <b>never add salt as it will only toughen the corn</b>. … Since corn tends to float on top of the water| I cover the pot. This helps the water come back to a boil faster and helps the corn cook.</p> <h2>Can you boil corn too long?</h2> <p><b>Avoid cooking corn for too long</b>. “If you have super fresh corn — which can even be eaten raw — it’s a waste of time to cook for the common recommended time of 20 [or more] minutes|” says Jones. Overcooking can also result in chewy and firm kernels. You can steam for 8-10 minutes or less| or even use the microwave.</p> <h2>Can you boil corn kernels?</h2> <p>Take a big vessel or a pot and add water to it. Cover it using a lid and bring it to boil. … Now| place the cob or separated corn kernels in the pot and cover with a lid so that they can cook in steam. Wait for 5-7 minutes and drain the excess water.</p> <h2>What happens if you over boil corn?</h2> <p><b>Heat speeds the conversion of sugar to starch</b>. Thus| overcooked corn not only will be mushy| it will lack its characteristic sweet taste. With today`s hybrids| corn on the cob should be plunged into boiling water and cooked just long enough to warm it. This might take only 30 seconds.</p> <h2>How long should I cook sweet corn?</h2> <p>Using tongs| drop your corn into the boiling water. Return the water to a boil| then cook your corn for <b>5 minutes</b>. Set a timer because if you let your corn overcook the kernels can become tough. The goal is juicy| crunchy kernels| not mushy dry ones.</p> <h2>Why do you put milk in water when boiling corn?</h2> <p>Why Would I Boil Corn in Milk? Boiling your corn in milk <b>brings out the sweetness of the corn that you are cooking</b>| especially in sweet corn. This can also be enhanced even more when adding sugar to the water and milk liquid.</p> <h2>How many whistles does it take to boil corn?</h2> <p>Cook the sweet corn kernels in pressure cooker with salt and water for <b>3 to 4 whistles</b>. You could also boil in a pan. Though cooking in a pan will take longer. If using corn cobs then pressure cook or steam them in enough water.</p> <h2>What main dish goes with corn on the cob?</h2> <p>Cook the sweet corn kernels in pressure cooker with salt and water for <b>3 to 4 whistles</b>. You could also boil in a pan. Though cooking in a pan will take longer. If using corn cobs then pressure cook or steam them in enough water.</p> <p><img src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/how-cook-corn-387E.jpg" alt="How to cook corn" title="How to cook corn" class=""/></p> <p>Find just-for-you recipes, save favorites and more when you customize your Flavor Profile.</p> <p>Already have an account? Login. </p> <p><img src="https://d1e3z2jco40k3v.cloudfront.net/-/media/project/oneweb/mccormick-us/global/social-icons/blue/facebook.png?rev=e0782cad520447049f812c1d764d6dd6&vd=20210712T194536Z&hash=0906A0AC9AEA93ED4066371D76354F50" alt="How to cook corn" title="How to cook corn" class=""/></p> <p><img src="https://d1e3z2jco40k3v.cloudfront.net/-/media/project/oneweb/mccormick-us/global/social-icons/black/messenger.png?rev=e13a55bc664a4b99a43608e9409afc0b&vd=20210712T194531Z&hash=76F23B27D072EBF346AE8491ADC83BC6" alt="How to cook corn" title="How to cook corn" class=""/></p> <p><img src="https://d1e3z2jco40k3v.cloudfront.net/-/media/project/oneweb/mccormick-us/global/social-icons/others/pinterest.png?rev=d4400b524dd94d53b0dd3b0cf315601d&vd=20210712T194526Z&hash=DB818B474482FB78CAA9F65CC74A7DC1" alt="How to cook corn" title="How to cook corn" class=""/></p> <p><img src="https://d1e3z2jco40k3v.cloudfront.net/-/media/project/oneweb/mccormick-us/global/social-icons/others/twitter.png?rev=45dafb1b66d54e63bbce4ef36932f5b6&vd=20210712T194526Z&hash=5C709F41437EF7302922BC287CB39234" alt="How to cook corn" title="How to cook corn" class=""/></p> <p><img src="https://d1e3z2jco40k3v.cloudfront.net/-/media/project/oneweb/mccormick-us/global/social-icons/black/email.png?rev=a2bc6980107c4032a33ec171d192cb11&vd=20210712T194532Z&hash=38B7C2EAA1C6FB0B3F8C7E94D7C8FEAD" alt="How to cook corn" title="How to cook corn" class=""/></p> <p><img src="https://d1e3z2jco40k3v.cloudfront.net/-/media/project/oneweb/mccormick-us/global/social-icons/black/copy-link.png?rev=d0c829c0cd0141b2821711c746c2e9f0&vd=20210712T194532Z&hash=802D8F46ACBC25C49978D98C22D842F4" alt="How to cook corn" title="How to cook corn" class=""/></p> <p>This spice has now been added to your Flavor Profile, under “My Spices”.</p> <p>No spam ever! Read our privacy policy </p> <p>Are you out of McCormick <title>?</p> <p>Are you sure you want to remove</p> <h4>Own this spice?</h4> <p>Set up your Flavor Profile or log in to:</p> <ul> <li>Add this spice to “My Spices”</li> <li>Create a more personalized experience</li> <li>Manage your spices in Flavor Profile</li> </ul> <p>No spam ever! Read our privacy policy </p> <p>Sign up to save your favorite flavors.</p> <p>No spam ever! Read our privacy policy </p> <p>DON’T HAVE AN ACCOUNT? REGISTER TODAY</p> <p>Already have an account? login </p> <p>Already have an account? login </p> <h3>Social Media</h3> <p>Because we are constantly improving our products, we encourage you to read the ingredient statement on our packages at the time of your purchase.</p> <p>Summer brings a great many annual joys: sunny warmth, longer days, the possibility of a vacation, and produce that is and tastes fresher than the ingredients we get throughout the rest of the year. One of the best among these (in my humble opinion) is corn. Memories of farmstand-fresh corn are my gold standard, which is why I can never bring myself to buy those odd, stripped, plastic-wrapped ears that you can find in December. I prefer to wait until late June — for the good stuff!</p> <p>When buying fresh corn, there's no need to half-shuck the ear to check it. If the ear feels full and heavy, and (most essentially) if the silky tassel at the top is dry and looks fresh, you're good to go. If you plan to eat it on the cob, please don't boil it to death. All you really need to do is to get it warm enough to melt your butter. You can also roast it or grill it, in or out of the husk. </p> <p>But my absolute <strong>favorite</strong> way to cook and eat fresh corn (or frozen, for that matter) is to first slice the kernels OFF of the cob, and then move on over to the stove. I give the corn kernels either a quick, gentle warm-up in a skillet with butter and whatever herbs and/or spices I'm in the mood for, or a really high heat "roasting"  in a nonstick skillet on the stove. This roasting/searing process will give you a wonderful toasted, popcorn-like, charred taste that I happen to love. This takes a few minutes longer, but as soon as your corn starts to smell like popcorn, and  there are some dark spots appearing, you're ready. Just be sure to use a nonstick pan for this method, because otherwise. the corn will stick!</p> <p>Now let's address the obvious: Removing fresh corn from the cob isn't everyone's favorite kitchen pastime. I understand. I'm pretty sure most of us have tried to cut kernels off of a cob and ended up with them all over the counter and the kitchen floor. And I know that there are a hundred and one tricks to prevent that from happening, like balancing the cob in the center of a bundt cake pan, but the following method is a bit simpler and more effective. Break or cut off as much stem as you can, stand the cob stem-side-down in a tall bowl, and, using your sharpest knife, slice from the top in a curving manner that uses the whole blade (from the heel to the point), not just one section. This means you aren't pushing straight down the cob. It will feel odd at first, but once you do a few cobs, this curving, not pushing, motion will become your go-to, mess-free method.</p> <p>You now have a bowl filled with corn, and a pan waiting for it. Now is the moment to have fun with flavoring: salt, pepper, chile powder, any fresh herbs you can get your hands on, citrus zest, maybe a shower of cheese at the end? This cob-less corn can go in any direction you like, and it's so easy to thoroughly season it and make the most of its sweet, summer flavor. This versatility is the real beauty of cooking corn off the cob — that, and it's far easier to eat (especially in front of company). Just remember, fresh corn hardly needs to be cooked at all. So, I typically add all of the seasonings to the butter in the pan for a bit of time on the heat before the corn goes in. </p> <p>Are there moments when gnawing on corn ON the cob and getting covered in butter is the way to go? Absolutely. But a beautiful bowl of seasoned, deliciously flavored corn off the cob is going to be my choice about 95% of the time. </p> </div><!-- .entry-content --> <footer class="entry-footer default-max-width"> <div class="posted-by"><span class="posted-on">Published <time class="entry-date published updated" datetime="2021-11-09T17:42:00+00:00">November 9, 2021</time></span><span class="byline">By <a href="https://aempharmservice.com/author/howmaster/" rel="author">Howmaster</a></span></div><div class="post-taxonomies"><span class="cat-links">Categorized as <a href="https://aempharmservice.com/it/" rel="category tag">IT</a> </span></div> </footer><!-- .entry-footer --> </article><!-- #post-3799 --> <nav class="navigation post-navigation" aria-label="Posts"> <h2 class="screen-reader-text">Post navigation</h2> <div class="nav-links"><div class="nav-previous"><a href="https://aempharmservice.com/how-to-play-solitaire/" rel="prev"><p class="meta-nav"><svg class="svg-icon" width="24" height="24" aria-hidden="true" role="img" focusable="false" viewBox="0 0 24 24" fill="none" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg"><path fill-rule="evenodd" clip-rule="evenodd" d="M20 13v-2H8l4-4-1-2-7 7 7 7 1-2-4-4z" fill="currentColor"/></svg>Previous post</p><p class="post-title">How to play solitaire</p></a></div><div class="nav-next"><a href="https://aempharmservice.com/how-to-make-succotash/" rel="next"><p class="meta-nav">Next post<svg class="svg-icon" width="24" height="24" aria-hidden="true" role="img" focusable="false" viewBox="0 0 24 24" fill="none" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg"><path fill-rule="evenodd" clip-rule="evenodd" d="m4 13v-2h12l-4-4 1-2 7 7-7 7-1-2 4-4z" fill="currentColor"/></svg></p><p class="post-title">How to make succotash</p></a></div></div> </nav> </main><!-- #main --> </div><!-- #primary --> </div><!-- #content --> <aside class="widget-area"> <section id="search-2" class="widget widget_search"><form role="search" method="get" class="search-form" action="https://aempharmservice.com/"> <label for="search-form-1">Search…</label> <input type="search" id="search-form-1" class="search-field" value="" name="s" /> <input type="submit" class="search-submit" value="Search" /> </form> </section> <section id="recent-posts-2" class="widget widget_recent_entries"> <h2 class="widget-title">Recent Posts</h2><nav aria-label="Recent Posts"> <ul> <li> <a href="https://aempharmservice.com/how-to-make-a-malt/">How to make a malt</a> </li> <li> <a href="https://aempharmservice.com/how-to-start-making-a-breast-icon/">How to start making a breast icon</a> </li> <li> <a href="https://aempharmservice.com/how-to-make-popsicle-stick-christmas-trees/">How to make popsicle stick christmas trees</a> </li> <li> <a href="https://aempharmservice.com/how-to-get-rid-of-groundhogs/">How to get rid of groundhogs</a> </li> <li> <a href="https://aempharmservice.com/how-to-make-cinnamon-toast/">How to make cinnamon toast</a> </li> </ul> </nav></section><section id="categories-3" class="widget widget_categories"><h2 class="widget-title">Categories</h2><nav aria-label="Categories"> <ul> <li class="cat-item cat-item-5"><a href="https://aempharmservice.com/interior/">Interior</a> </li> <li class="cat-item cat-item-3"><a href="https://aempharmservice.com/it/">IT</a> </li> <li class="cat-item cat-item-2"><a href="https://aempharmservice.com/life-hack/">Life hack</a> </li> <li class="cat-item cat-item-7"><a href="https://aempharmservice.com/planning/">Planning</a> </li> <li class="cat-item cat-item-4"><a href="https://aempharmservice.com/psychology/">Psychology</a> </li> <li class="cat-item cat-item-6"><a href="https://aempharmservice.com/self-organization/">Self-organization</a> </li> </ul> </nav></section> </aside><!-- .widget-area --> <footer id="colophon" class="site-footer"> <div class="site-info"> <div class="site-name"> <a href="https://aempharmservice.com/">Howmaster</a> </div><!-- .site-name --> <div class="powered-by"> Proudly powered by <a href="https://wordpress.org/">WordPress</a>. </div><!-- .powered-by --> </div><!-- .site-info --> </footer><!-- #colophon --> </div><!-- #page --> <script>document.body.classList.remove("no-js");</script> <script> if ( -1 !== navigator.userAgent.indexOf( 'MSIE' ) || -1 !== navigator.appVersion.indexOf( 'Trident/' ) ) { document.body.classList.add( 'is-IE' ); } </script> <script id='twenty-twenty-one-ie11-polyfills-js-after'> ( Element.prototype.matches && Element.prototype.closest && window.NodeList && NodeList.prototype.forEach ) || document.write( '<script src="https://aempharmservice.com/wp-content/themes/twentytwentyone/assets/js/polyfills.js?ver=1.5"></scr' + 'ipt>' ); </script> <script src='https://aempharmservice.com/wp-content/themes/twentytwentyone/assets/js/responsive-embeds.js?ver=1.5' id='twenty-twenty-one-responsive-embeds-script-js'></script> <script> /(trident|msie)/i.test(navigator.userAgent)&&document.getElementById&&window.addEventListener&&window.addEventListener("hashchange",(function(){var t,e=location.hash.substring(1);/^[A-z0-9_-]+$/.test(e)&&(t=document.getElementById(e))&&(/^(?:a|select|input|button|textarea)$/i.test(t.tagName)||(t.tabIndex=-1),t.focus())}),!1); </script> </body> </html>