How to communicate with your autistic child

How to communicate with your autistic child

How to communicate with your autistic child

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can scare parents, in part because much of the condition is still not well understood. Doctors and scientists are still trying to explain the causes of autism, which is expressed as a characteristic set of characteristics in children and adults, including difficulties with social interaction, problems with verbal and non-verbal communication, patterns repetitive behavioral and narrow obsessive interests.

How common is autism?

Statistics show autism is on the rise – about 1 in 59 children are diagnosed with autism before age 8, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a number that has grown with every update since 2000. when only 1 in 150 children are diagnosed. It is also more than four times more common in boys than girls, although the difference has narrowed over the years.

That said, the statistics don’t say it all. Many experts argue that rising rates of autism may simply be caused by diagnosing more children due to greater awareness of the disorder or because a wider range of developmental disorders are now defined as part of the autism spectrum.

What are the causes of autism?

Contrary to what you may have heard, vaccines do not cause autism. In fact, the journal that published the original 1998 study linking the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine with autism withdrew it and later found that the author falsified his data and misrepresented the results (his license has been revoked). Many subsequent large-scale studies have also discredited the results.

Is it too much TV to blame? It is unlikely, although Cornell University researchers reported in a 2006 paper of a link between the increase in television viewing by children under the age of 3 and rising rates of autism.

Some research suggests that other underlying factors can lead to autism, including genetic and chromosomal abnormalities, maternal rubella during pregnancy, or fetal brain damage in late pregnancy.

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How to communicate with your autistic child

How to communicate with your autistic child

How to communicate with your autistic child

How to communicate with your autistic child

How to communicate with your autistic child

How to communicate with your autistic child

Many studies over the past decade have also shown that parental age can also influence the risk of autism. One study found that women over the age of 40 were twice as likely to have a child with autism than those aged 25 or younger, while another study found that teens are 15 times more likely to have children with autism versus those who are not. age of 20 years. Another study found that children of fathers over the age of 45 had a 75% higher risk of developing autism than children born to fathers in the early 1920s.

Researchers also believe that many still unknown environmental factors may play a role in autism, including exposure to pesticides, chemicals in household products, and viruses.

What early signs of autism should I look out for in my child?

While the causes of autism remain mysterious, the early symptoms of autism don’t a out of nowhere. Most parents of autistic children recognize language delays at the age of around 18 months. In fact, there are several red flags that parents can point out to their child much earlier. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) states that some of the subtle, early signs of autism to look for when your child is 12-18 months of age include:

  • Your baby doesn’t turn around when you say his name until he is 12 months old
  • Tuo figlio non si gira a guardare quando indichi e dici: "Guarda…"
  • Your child is not indicating to show you interesting objects or events
  • Your child does not engage in chatting back and forth
  • Delay smiling and laughing
  • Your baby is not making or maintaining eye contact with people

Other early symptoms of autism that require evaluation by a pediatrician include (just to name a few):

  • No senseless gestures, pointing or anything for 12 months
  • No single words for 16 months
  • No spontaneous two-word sentences for 24 months
  • Loss of language or social skills at any age

What should i do if i think my child may have early signs of autism?

If your child has shown early signs of autism, talk to your pediatrician. He can use a standard screening tool to determine if your child has autism or is at risk.

Although there is no cure for autism, early intervention can make a big difference. Le terapie comportamentali possono aiutare i bambini a sviluppare abilità sociali e linguistiche, ad esempio, e i farmaci possono trattare gli impulsi e l’iperattività.

If you haven’t identified any of these symptoms but are still worried that your child has autism, try not to let your fears stand in the way of your time with your child. Pay attention to his behavior (and remember that even the healthiest children can be shy and distant at times) and ask your pediatrician questions. He’s likely to be fine!

Here it is for motherly love (and care)

  • What to expect in the first year, 3rd edition, Heidi Murkoff and Sharon Mazel.
  • What to expect. com, Early Signs of Autism, November 2017.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)April 2018

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,Vaccines don’t cause autism, November 2015.

Social Science Research Network, “Does Television Cause Autism?” Johnson School research paper, Cornell University, May 30, 2007.

National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, Does rubella cause autism: 2015 reassessment ?,Frontiers of Human Neuroscience, February 2016.

University of California, Davis, The age of the mother increases the risk of autism, February 2010.

How to communicate with your autistic child

Since one of the classic symptoms of autism is a pronounced deficit in verbal communication skills, a common problem for practical analysts and others who work with children and even adults with autism spectrum disorder is simply the ability to have a basic conversation. Something as simple as figuring out what they want for lunch or whether they’re happy, sad, or indifferent to their current school assignment can be next to impossible if you rely on normal conversation methods.

But don’t let that stop you!

There are ways to talk to autistic children and you can make them easier by keeping the following tips in mind.

YOU SHOULD MAKE EFFORT to talk to them

Because talking to children with autism can be difficult, many adults choose the easy way out and simply avoid engaging them in conversations. But this is a mistake; both you and these children can benefit from trying to talk, even if they don’t always succeed.

There is also a tendency to assume that if an autistic child doesn’t respond or shut you down, they don’t like you or don’t want to talk. But this is not always the case; that signal would be clear from a neurotypical individual, but for someone with ASD, it’s only part of the syndrome. Don’t take it personally and don’t stop trying to kindly involve autistic children in your conversations. They probably want to get involved, they just have a harder time figuring out how.

How to communicate with your autistic child

How to communicate with your autistic child

How to communicate with your autistic child

Choose your moments

It is not always the right time to talk to an autistic child. Many of them have very specific schedules and rhythms for their behavior. If you interrupt them when they are deeply involved in something else, chances are you won’t get them involved as you hoped.

Likewise, it is often not a good time to commit when the child is already worried about something. Excessive stimuli can exclude children from ASD. Wait for peace and quiet if you want to talk.

    Talk about what they want to talk about

    One way that will never get you far with an autistic child is to try to force the conversation in the direction you want it to be. At best you will be ignored; at worst, they will either go out or have a vent.

    Obsessions are part of the syndrome, and obsession means a lot of arguments about one thing in particular. You may find it boring or simple, but you will find a lot more involvement by sticking to the topic the child wants to discuss.

    Keep the point

    Stay away from allusions, metaphors or abstract statements. Autistic children will generally not be able to interpret any type of communication based on reading their inner emotional state or any subtext.

    Keep sentences short and direct.

    The pace of the conversation must be at a level that the child can handle. For most of us, processing sentences the way we hear them is second nature and happens almost instantly. However, children with autism must work to analyze what they feel. Give them the time they need to do it.

    If talking doesn’t work, try writing!

    If you a to a point of disagreement in the conversation, try repeating what you just said on the paper. Draw a picture or write the words and display them. ASD patients tend to think visually, so even if they don’t immediately understand what they just heard, they might get the same message if you put it down on paper so they can see it.

    Pay attention to non-verbal cues

    Because autistic children can have many problems manipulating and understanding language, they often develop different types of words that signal things that can be expected to be verbalized. Some of the movements or actions they use when they speak can say more than the words they say if you pay attention and learn to interpret them.

    Remember these are just kids!

    Autistic children may not be able to behave like neurotypical children, but remember that you are still talking to someone whose thoughts and attitudes form in an immature brain.

    With a little practice, you may find that you can talk to autistic children as easily as you can with any child. The results, both for you and for your child, can be both positive in terms of developing communication skills and pleasant when you establish interpersonal contact.

How to communicate with your autistic child

As a parent, you hope that your child not only does well in class, but that he gets along well with others and adapts to himself. But imagine that you are the parent of a child with a disability that may not be immediately recognizable. You would like people to understand and be kind.

Children with autism often attend mainstream schools, but it can be difficult to recognize them. You may find that they communicate differently or how they interact differently and you wonder how to interact with them and how to take this into account.

"Solo perché i bambini autistici comunicano in modo diverso non significa che dovrebbero essere ignorati", afferma la logopedista Erin McQuivey, MS, CCC-SLP, che lavora con i bambini autistici a responsabile della riabilitazione infantile primaria presso l’Intermountain Hospital. Riverton in Riverton, Utah.

“Children with autism can communicate in many different ways. They can use words, facial expressions, gestures, emotions and even assistive technologies, “he adds.” We should view all of these methods as meaningful communication. It is their way of building relationships, receiving requests and commenting. We should identify the methods of communication by which they feel at ease “.

What are Autism Spectrum Disorders?

Autism spectrum disorders are developmental disorders that affect children’s interactions and communication with others. They are called the spectrum due to the wide range of autism types and symptoms, including Asperger’s syndrome. One out of every 59 children in the U. S. has an autism spectrum disorder and the numbers are increasing, according to a 2014 study by the Centers for Disease Control, and it’s more common in boys. There is no cure for autism, but early intervention and treatment can make a big difference. Since no two people with autism are alike and since autism affects their lives differently, people should try not to make assumptions about someone’s needs or abilities.

Common symptoms of autism spectrum disorders:

  • Difficulty connecting with others, responding to social cues, and understanding feelings
  • Difficulty communicating, including speaking and understanding
  • Unusual reactions to sound, smell, taste, appearance or well-being
  • Avoid or resist physical contact
  • Discomfort when regular activities are interrupted
  • Repetitive and physical actions

“It is important for parents to help their child understand that there are children who are different from them. Parents can teach their children simple tools and tips for communicating with autistic children, ”says McQuivey.

Six tips for positive interaction with children with autism spectrum disorder:

  • Be patient. Children with autism may take longer to process information.
  • Be gentle and flexible. They are often less able to adapt to new situations.
  • Use gestures or other means of communication besides words.
  • Learn how to show interest and affection in a way that satisfies them.
  • Use positive reinforcement. Praise or reward praise and good manners.
  • Don’t take things personally if their answers are sincere.

Jodi Clark, who is a mother of five, including eight-year-old Caleb, who suffers from autism, says: “I hope people don’t think my son is unwise and expect less of him. devote individual attention to it, but also encourage integration with others “.

How Do Speech Therapists Help Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders?

Speech therapists can help children with autism improve their social and communication skills. They teach them how to deal with others, understand and use gestures and other alternative forms of communication, follow directions, ask questions and respond.

They can also help with feeding problems and sensory issues with eating if children don’t like how food feels, looks, tastes, or smells.

They also teach parents how to help their child with autism navigate the world better. They provide parents with suggestions on how to support their children’s needs in school.

Posted on Last updated: February 6, 2021 by: Author Nicole Day

What this article contains: Tips to help you as an adult improve your communication and optimize your language so that you can communicate better with your autistic child.

Communicationit is the act of transmitting the meanings intended by one person or group to another through mutually understood signs and semiotic rules.

The sender delivers the message via the channel to the recipient. The receiver provides feedback.

How to communicate with your autistic child

This is part of a 13 part series. Each post in the series will explain the evidence-based strategy used by professionals to manage the behavior of children on the autism spectrum. Each part of this series will include a summary so that you can easily navigate through the different strategies.

Summary

  1. introduction
  2. Build a relationship
  3. Personalize your motivation
  4. Look, listen, then join
  5. Language optimization
  6. Premack Director
  7. Basic redirection
  8. Pauses
  9. Image example
  10. Add structure to home
  11. Teach independence with tips
  12. Transactional support
  13. Add structure to the learning environment

How to communicate with your autistic child

How to optimize your language

As adults, we can understand and adapt our language when communicating with an autistic child. If your child has autism, you should be well aware of their current level of communication skills.

Using this knowledge, you can get to know your child at their level and optimize your language, improving the communication process, making it easier for them to understand you.

1. Speak slower

People with autism often take longer to process the messages they receive. Speaking slower gives your child more time to decode messages.

Don’t repeat yourself if you don’t get an answer right away. Also, the processing time increases when children are nervous.

Imagine you’re working on a 100 piece puzzle and halfway through it someone throws another 100 piece puzzle at us.

This makes it much more difficult to complete the puzzle.

The same goes for the brain trying to decode the message, you need to give your child enough time to decode what you are saying.

2. Reflect their language

Use similar language to your child to help them understand you better.

If they are speaking in two-word sentences – don’t give them long answers – answer them in two-word sentences as well.

Matching the child’s language and choosing suitable words will help convey a stronger message that will be easier for the child to code.

3. Use exaggerated facial expressions

Facial expressions indicate communication emotions and intentions. In social interactions, people need to be quick to differentiate and react. This can be a challenge for people with ASD.

To optimize your language, it helps to exaggerate facial expressions to make it easier for your child to process the emotions behind the communication.

It is also helpful to be very conscious when expressing facial expressions.

Did you know that the reason the trains in Thomas & Friends have very exaggerated facial expressions is so kids can understand a the trains are feeling? Maybe that’s why it’s such a popular TV for kids with ASD.

How to communicate with your autistic child

4. Exaggerate your body language and gestures

Like facial expressions, exaggerating body language and gestures can also make it easier for your child to decode messages.

Adding and exaggerating body language in verbal communication with your child provides visual support that stands out and can increase the importance of communication.

Pointing, clapping, pushing, trampling, etc. sono esempi di modi per ottimizzare il linguaggio esagerando il linguaggio del corpo e i gesti.

5. Select the appropriate channel

Some individuals with autism find it difficult to decode a message when it as from more than one channel at the same time. It is a more sensory input to be processed and decoded at the same time.

Then choose the channel with which your child communicates best: it could be a visual channel such as PEC, verbal, written words etc.

Tito Mukhopadhyay is a poet and writer with severe non-verbal autism. He explained it this way

"Vedo o sento – non posso fare entrambe le cose contemporaneamente"

Did your child understand your message?

Communication goes both ways. It is of the utmost importance that your child understands you. If they don’t understand what you are saying, then you cannot communicate with your autistic child.

You should look for cues when talking to your child to exchange what he does so that he understands what you have said. Being able to repeat what you said does not mean that they understand.

The best indicator is whether they will respond appropriately to your message.

If they understand, they will react the same way to different situations and circumstances.This way you can confidently say that this is not a script response.

Keep in mind that children with autism often interpret language literally.

Ad esempio, se tuo figlio ti chiede se può guardare la TV e tu dici "tra un minuto" e poi va a guardare la TV, probabilmente ha capito il tuo messaggio a "Ho il permesso di guardare la TV tra 60 secondi".

Una volta un insegnante ha detto a mio figlio che "non può andarsene finché non sono stati raccolti tutti i libri" e mio figlio ha effettivamente urinato nei pantaloni perché sentiva di dover rimanere lì finché non ha raccolto tutti i libri e non ha nemmeno chiesto l’insegnante se poteva usare il bagno perché ha preso il suo primo messaggio esattamente a aveva detto.

Needless to say, he was unable to communicate well with any autistic child.

How to communicate with your autistic child

As a parent, you hope that your child not only does well in class, but that he gets along well with others and adapts to himself. But imagine that you are the parent of a child with a disability that may not be immediately recognizable. You would like people to understand and be kind.

Children with autism often attend mainstream schools, but it can be difficult to recognize them. You may find that they communicate differently or how they interact differently and you wonder how to interact with them and how to take this into account.

"Solo perché i bambini autistici comunicano in modo diverso non significa che dovrebbero essere ignorati", afferma la logopedista Erin McQuivey, MS, CCC-SLP, che lavora con i bambini autistici a responsabile della riabilitazione infantile primaria presso l’Intermountain Hospital. Riverton in Riverton, Utah.

“Children with autism can communicate in many different ways. They can use words, facial expressions, gestures, emotions and even assistive technologies, “he adds.” We should view all of these methods as meaningful communication. It is their way of building relationships, receiving requests and commenting. We should identify the methods of communication by which they feel at ease “.

What are Autism Spectrum Disorders?

Autism spectrum disorders are developmental disorders that affect children’s interactions and communication with others. They are called the spectrum due to the wide range of autism types and symptoms, including Asperger’s syndrome. One out of every 59 children in the U. S. has an autism spectrum disorder and the numbers are increasing, according to a 2014 study by the Centers for Disease Control, and it’s more common in boys. There is no cure for autism, but early intervention and treatment can make a big difference. Since no two people with autism are alike and since autism affects their lives differently, people should try not to make assumptions about someone’s needs or abilities.

Common symptoms of autism spectrum disorders:

  • Difficulty connecting with others, responding to social cues, and understanding feelings
  • Difficulty communicating, including speaking and understanding
  • Unusual reactions to sound, smell, taste, appearance or well-being
  • Avoid or resist physical contact
  • Discomfort when regular activities are interrupted
  • Repetitive and physical actions

“It is important for parents to help their child understand that there are children who are different from them. Parents can teach their children simple tools and tips for communicating with autistic children, ”says McQuivey.

Six tips for positive interaction with children with autism spectrum disorder:

  • Be patient. Children with autism may take longer to process information.
  • Be gentle and flexible. They are often less able to adapt to new situations.
  • Use gestures or other means of communication besides words.
  • Learn how to show interest and affection in a way that satisfies them.
  • Use positive reinforcement. Praise or reward praise and good manners.
  • Don’t take things personally if their answers are sincere.

Jodi Clark, who is a mother of five, including eight-year-old Caleb, who suffers from autism, says: “I hope people don’t think my son is unwise and expect less of him. devote individual attention to it, but also encourage integration with others “.

How Do Speech Therapists Help Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders?

Speech therapists can help children with autism improve their social and communication skills. They teach them how to deal with others, understand and use gestures and other alternative forms of communication, follow directions, ask questions and respond.

They can also help with feeding problems and sensory issues with eating if children don’t like how food feels, looks, tastes, or smells.

They also teach parents how to help their child with autism navigate the world better. They provide parents with suggestions on how to support their children’s needs in school.

Techniques to try with non-verbal or preverbal children

Lyndsey Garbi, MD, is a dual board certified pediatrician in Pediatrics and Neonatology.

When people hear that a child is non-verbal, they often think of autism (ASD). Although some people with ASD are non-verbal, there are many other conditions that make a child non-verbal, preverbal, or develop or delay verbal, short – or long-term skills. These include non-verbal learning difficulties (NVLDs), childhood apraxia, and various speech and language disorders.

Being non-verbal or pre-verbal is not necessarily related to your level of intelligence – it is important to consult a specialist for an accurate diagnosis. So look for appropriate speech therapy as part of your treatment plan.

Communication doesn’t always refer to speaking, although it’s still important to speak with your nonverbal child. Each child reacts differently to different types of communication; find out what works best for your baby and then use it regularly.

Talk to their teachers, therapists and providers about the different techniques and strategies you can use. When you have a system that works, let them know so that everyone can communicate with your baby in a way that works.

Techniques to Foster Communication With a Pre-Verbal or Nonverbal Child

Whether your child is preverbal or non-verbal, there are many ways to encourage communication. These techniques are not a substitute for speech therapy or other types of therapy specific to their needs, but they are supplemental things you can do to encourage communication in a variety of ways.

Go ahead

Just because your child may not speak doesn’t mean you should stop talking to him or her.

Anche se il loro linguaggio aperto è ritardato o minimo, continua a parlare e a narrare con loro. Include them in conversations and don’t talk about them as if they weren’t there.

Use sign language

Along with American Sign Language (ASL), Makaton Sign Language is used with non-verbal people along with speech. Makaton uses signs and symbols and is easily adaptable to different needs and levels of communication.

Note

Note na sygnały i zacaania niewerbalne, a także na mimikę twarzy. People can communicate in many different ways – spoken words are only part of it. Your baby can communicate emotions, wants and needs to you in other ways you may not notice.

Use plain language

Instead of using complicated multi-word sentences, use one – or two-word sentences to mark things and give direction.

Don’t complicate it. If your child can say one-word sentences, he uses two-word sentences and signals to give him a little nudge without overloading him.

Pause

After you say something or ask a question, pause for a moment, just like you would when talking to a friend or someone who speaks verbally. This gives the child some time to respond in any way. Also model your child’s correct basic communication skills.

Sit at eye level

Communicating with your baby at eye level puts you in his or her field of vision and allows your baby to see your hands, face and mouth more easily. It can also help them interpret what you are communicating with your body language.

Be smart

There are many applications for smartphones and tablets that can help you communicate through educational games and exercises. Some even help turn your device into an assistive communication device.

Use the clues

You can introduce your child to the choices. For example, label three different snacks A, B and C and ask them to choose the one they want by pointing to the letter. Another option is to get photo flashcards and ask your child to show what he wants or to make the right choice. Image Exchange Communication System (PECS) cards are also useful for non-verbal people.

Don’t underestimate the game

Play time can be a great time to work on communication, especially with games or toys that require imitation or encourage cause and effect.

Activities that encourage social interaction, such as singing, dancing, or playing with dolls, can be fun ways to practice communicating with your child.

Use Alternative Methods of Communication

For example, children with non-verbal autism often find that they can express their emotions through dance, art, or other hand movements. Try finger painting or sensory exercises with them to see if it helps you express yourself.

A word from Verywell

Unfortunately, there is no magic ball for a non-verbal or preverbal child to speak and each child reacts differently to techniques and therapies. It is important to share what you do with your child’s therapists and care team and ask them for suggestions for exploring something you may not have considered before.

Sometimes it can be difficult to communicate with a non-verbal child and it’s important to remember to remain flexible and calm. Non-verbal children are often very sensitive to the emotions of those around them, especially their parents or guardians.

It is difficult to communicate with non-verbal children, but having a support system is extremely helpful. Keep practicing with your child and eventually you will find what resonates and allows for the best communication.

Connect and communicate with an autistic child è un nuovo libro che presenta un "percorso 3C" semplice e centrato sulla persona per connettersi, calmarsi e comunicare, che a sua volta consente ai genitori di comprendere le sfide che un bambino autistico può affrontare: camminare nei suoi panni " consentendo ai bambini di diventare più consapevoli di sé ed esprimersi in modo sano.

When Tessa Morton and Jane Gurnett wrote the Autism Act together in 2016, the last thing they imagined was to write a book. However, when Jessica Kingsley Publishers came up with the possibility, they pounced on it. This ‘Just say yes’ attitude is born of the desire to spread the message as far and wide as possible, and the message is, if you are neurotypical then ‘the change starts with you’ when it as to creating and maintaining meaningful relationships with people that see, feel and hear the world differently to you.

How to communicate with your autistic child

Tessa and Jane’s ability to participate in this change includes training healthcare professionals, teachers and parents, making award-winning films, but most of all working and learning fromrealexperts who are autistic children, adolescents and adults.

They do not inflict blows during training; for example, they ask participants to ‘walk in the shoes’ of someone who finds a world designed by and for neurotypicals difficult to negotiate and challenging to feel part of. Using visceral exercises, where participants are tasked to empathise through experiencing sensory overload and ‘cognitive chaos’ they create an experience that many participants say stays with them and gives them a greater understanding of why the change has to start with them.

Over the past five years, the content of the bookConnect and communicate with an autistic child grown by osmosis. Tessa and Jane consumed newspapers and articles, visited every website and every source of information they could find. Attend and speak at conferences, running from speaker to speaker, ticking off the list of conferences, making sure they’ve followed every path in between. Secure post graduate degrees constantly exchange ideas and create new exercises and strategies, but all the time it was the real experts, the children and young people they work with, who created the books content.

Tessa and Jane have noticed that if they take two systematic steps back before going into communication mode, which seems to help. By simply connecting in a calm, open and authentic way, the person felt safe and seen. If they failed to do this, in their keenness to communicate, they saw communication failing and autistic individuals shutting or ‘melting’ down, because of the pressure they felt to meet peoples’ needs. It was a very simple activity of taking a few systematic steps backwards that helped create the 3C path. Tessa and Jane had, for example, witnessed many autistic individuals immobilised by other people’s ‘noise’ when there was too much energy flying around and multiple instructions.

Why is there a need for a book that tells you how to be less noisy? Parents had related experiences where they had been told that patience was what was needed when communicating, this they felt was a given but, and here was the problem, a do you bea more patient and less noisy for someone when you don’t really understand why you are doing it as you perceive the world differently.

How to communicate with your autistic child

Questo libro include approfondimenti e informazioni sulle differenze sensoriali e neurologiche, fino all’uso di tecniche teatrali, ma al centro del libro c’è "The 3C Path a unique low arousal technique that could revolutionize parenting and working with autistic people. It will really help you to understand (by walking in the shoes) about what it feels like to see, hear, and feel the world differently. Wielu rodziców i specjalistów ma trudności ze zrozumieniem tego, a w konsekwencji osoby z autyzmem mają trudności z zaufaniem i łączeniem się z tymi osobami w swoim życiu.

As parents and professionals, it was always Tessa and Jane’s desire to build reciprocal communication with the children they love and work with. This is the key to building trust.

The book is full of step by step easy to follow exercises and strategies which is what makes it a must read, one can understand cognitively why the need to be patient and less ‘noisy’, but it’s quite another to be able to do it. This book will accompany you on this journey.

This book can be found in JKP. com or wherever you buy books. Se vuoi leggere altri articoli a questo e ricevere le ultime informazioni e offerte sui nostri libri sull’autismo, iscriviti alla nostra mailing list? You may also be interested in our Facebook or Twitter page.

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How to communicate with your autistic child

Author: Anita Lesko, BSN, RN, MS, CRNA

It is called Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) for a very good reason. Na jednym końcu spektrum znajdują się osoby, które nie mogą mówić lub potrzebują całkowitej pomocy w czynnościach życia codziennego, a na drugim końcu tego spektrum są ludzie bardzo uzdolnieni, błyskotliwi i w ogóle nie potrzebujący pomocy. Esiste un’ampia gamma di sintomi, la gravità di questi sintomi, le abilità e il grado di disabilità.

The word “autism” as from the Greek word “autos” which means “I”. Children with ASD appear to exist in a private world, concerned about themselves, unable to communicate effectively or interact with others. Children with ASD may have difficulty developing language skills and understanding what others are saying to them. Inoltre, possono anche avere difficoltà con la comunicazione non verbale a il contatto visivo, le espressioni facciali e i gesti.

The huge differences between people with ASD can be quite difficult for healthcare professionals. Not all children will have difficulty communicating. Some people lack the ability to speak, while others have the unique ability to talk about their favorite interests in detail. People who can speak usually have a hard time using the language effectively when talking to others. They may also have a hard time processing what they are feeling and not understand what they are being told. For example, if an autistic child or adult receives verbal instructions on how to complete a task, she may not understand how to do it. However, if you actually show them that they do the same task, they will be able to successfully complete it on their own. It’s not uncommon for parents to think their child has hearing issues, because they don’t respond when spoken to. Quindi portano il bambino a un test dell’udito per scoprire che non c’è perdita dell’udito.

People with ASD are not even able to understand body language or the nuances of speech tones. Body language is the second form of communication that people use to express their thoughts, emotions and desires. People with ASD usually have difficulty at best, but are usually unable to decipher what the person is saying through facial expressions or body language. C’è anche una mancanza di contatto visivo con una persona con ASD. In fact, many will describe that trying to look someone in the eye is literally painful.

Now that you have an overview of the communication difficulties of people with ASD, think carefullya you will be able to communicate effectively with the next autistic patient, regardless of where they are on the autism spectrum. The ASD patient may not hear what you are saying, may not respond to her name, or may appear indifferent to any attempt to communicate with him.

Tips for communicating with an autistic patient

The first thing you need to do is take the ASD patient and their parents/support person to a very quiet, private room where it’s dimly lit with minimal medical equipment in the room. There shouldn’t be other patients or staff in the room. Vuoi creare un’atmosfera rilassata e calma. Questo di per sé rassicurerà l’individuo. You will reduce the sensory overload that affects the patient.

The next thing you need to do isask the parent a the child/adult typically communicates. They can provide a baseline expectation of a the patient will react to you. Observe how they communicate with their parents or whoever they are. You will be able to observe if they are using words or gestures. Ask them for suggestions on a you should approach the patient. Remember that the parent is with the child 24/7 and knows her every move. They are the best source of information for your patient. You can also use this time to get the patient’s medical history. Also, by letting the patient watch you talk to the parent, you will increase confidence in them.

Talk less and say it slowly, but not too slowly!