How to clean a limestone fireplace

The best way to clean limescale

Imagine: you’re a homeowner, and your new custom home feature made of limestone is finally installed. But, you’re realizing you don’t quite know how to clean it. Do not worry; Impresja is here to help you. Cleaning limescale is a necessary process to ensure that the stone lasts as long as possible. If properly cleaned and cared for, most limescale will last a lifetime, if not longer! Though cleaning is necessary, it’s not a particularly tedious task, but it does involve a few steps and regular maintenance. To best clean your limestone, you’ll need a vacuum, dry mop, or broom, a wet mop, limestone-specific soap, sealant, and stain remover. If you want to make your own stain remover, you’ll need flour and hydrogen peroxide.

Prepare the limestone surface

First, clean and prep the area of limestone that you’ll be cleaning. You can use a soft, dry cloth to dust the surface. Then, you’ll want to vacuum or use a soft-bristled broom to sweep up and remove any loose dirt and debris. Vacuums are great because they best suck up the dirt found in deeper crevices that brooms can’t often clean. Just remember to turn off the roller brush as the stiff bristles can scratch the limescale surface. It’s vital to clean the limestone area well because any debris left behind, once made wet by your cleaning solution, will act as abrasive particles that cause scratches as they’re dragged along the limestone.

Cleaning the limestone surface

Next, you’ll clean your limestone using water and soap. You’ll want to use a soft rag or non-abrasive sponge to apply a soapy solution. Your soap solution can be made by combining soap and warm water in a bucket. However, not all soaps are sufficient; soap should be a special cleaner designed for limescale. Specialty acid-free soaps like these are essential because limescale is a soft and porous material, which makes it susceptible to acid washing. This is especially true of those with a citrus base. Wash and wipe the surface until it’s shiny and clean!

Removal of stains from limestone surfaces

Limescale stains occur no matter how careful we are. In the bathroom, it’s various lotions, hair products, and toiletries. In the kitchen, it’s wine, coffee, tea, and more. Even outdoors, the chlorine from pool water, metal garden furniture and window frames can leave unsightly limescale stains. You can remove stains with special stain removers or by making your own compress at home to remove any limescale contamination. Start by taking the bowl and adding ¾ cup of flour. Gradually add the hydrogen peroxide, stirring after each addition. Stop when your mix becomes a paste. Apply the paste to any stains and let it dry. This process may take longer and up to two days for the compress to dry completely. Once dry, gently scrape the dough with a soft-edged scraper.

Rinse & Reapply Sealant to Your Limestone

After you’ve fully cleaned your limestone, rinse the surface with small amounts of plain water. Never let the soap stick to the limescale surface as it can leave a thin layer which causes a dull color and accumulates dirt faster. Clean with cool, lukewarm water until the surface forms bubbles or foam. After rinsing the surface, you’ll want to reapply sealant assuming that it’s time to. If you’re not sure if it’s time to reapply sealant or how to reapply it, you can visit our previous blog here on the topic! The sealant helps the limescale surface prevent future stains and damage by adding a protective barrier. A quality sealant is a must, especially in high traffic areas where limescale is starting to look worn.

Choose the limestone from the Impression experts

At Impression, we put the quality and care of your limestone first. We know it’s essential to find the perfect stone for your dream home, and keep it looking brand new for as long as possible. As mentioned, limestone can last a lifetime, and Impression will ensure you have the information to enable it to do so! Visit our site to get in touch with us and get started on your next custom home project, or visit our Limestone Options page to see the variations of this amazing and versatile natural stone we carry.

How to clean a limestone fireplace

A limestone fireplace is a very durable and long lasting fireplace that can provide years of fun and warmth on those wet and cold days. Limestone is a great material for building objects like fireplaces, but it has some problems. Limestone is a rather soft and porous natural rock.

If you have a fireplace, you will probably use it. Such use carries a high risk of marks, scratches, stains and other things that could damage the limestone fireplace. Be especially careful when using it. DIY homeowners can keep their limestone fireplace and keep it looking like new for years to come if they follow a few simple steps.

Keep lime fireplaces clean

After using a limestone fireplace, you may notice that there are traces you want to remove. When some clean, they simply grab the first thing they can reach under the kitchen cupboard or in the hallway cupboard. Because limescale is porous and relatively soft, using commercial cleaners, especially those containing abrasives, will severely damage your fireplace. Waxes and sprays can also cause discoloration and dark spots on the limestone surface.

Fireplaces look good when decorated with different accessories that emphasize the color or texture of the fireplace. However, water pots are the worst thing you can put on a limestone fireplace. Direct contact with the limestone surface can cause a dark ring that cannot be removed.

Logs and other combustible materials should never be placed directly on the limestone surface. Dirt, stones and sticks can scratch the surface. Other types of liquids or stains also mark the surface.

Seal your fireplace

This is especially true for new homeowners or newly built limestone fireplaces. Sealants will not change the color of the fireplace, but they will protect it from stains and scratches. Apply the sealant in two coats, allowing the first coat to dry completely before applying the second. Your local hardware store should have several types of sealant available. The relatively inexpensive limestone fireplace gasket will protect your investment for several years from reuse.

Transparent with cotton

Instead of using commercial cleaners, the best way to clean a limestone fireplace is to use a soft cotton cloth moistened with a very diluted liquid soap. Scrub the limescale in a circular motion, without rubbing hard and hard back and forth.

Stronger stains should fade after a few minutes of scrubbing. Don’t panic and use harsh chemical cleaners, steel wool or other to scratch the surface. Take your time and thoroughly clean your limestone fireplace using these tips.

How to clean a limestone fireplace

The more classic, neutral and chic you want your fireplace to look, the more you should understand that building a marble and limestone fireplace around your fireplace is the perfect and profitable way to do this. The most common misconception is, that it’s only right to create marble or limestone fireplace surrounds for wood burners. I’m glad to tell you, that if you attach your fireplace to the wall or create around it sort of a surface to attach marble or limestone to (in case your fireplace is in the middle of the room), then you may definitely go for it, design the look of the future surround or ask a professional to do it, and start constructing it. The process won’t take you too long, but the final result will look marvelous and will last you a lifetime, looking as good as new even after several decades.

Here are the most important tips for designing fireplaces. Here is the first step to designing fireplaces. Check for yourself! You can pick up the How To Clean A Limestone Fireplace Surround guide and read the latest Limestone Fireplace Surround and its notes here.

Photo gallery of the method of cleaning the surrounding environment of a limestone fireplace

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Metal fireplace surround is sure to be an eye-catching, unusual and bold way to decorate your fireplace. It’s possible to make your surround fully metal or combine aluminum, stainless steel, ordinary steel or copper with other materials, most probably with wood panels around the actual fireplace or stone top shelves. Incandescence […]

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Stone fireplaces are a great addition to any home. Read on to find out step by step how to clean the different types of stone fireplaces.

Updated on April 8, 2020

By the Cleanipedia team

Participation

How to clean a limestone fireplace

Cleaning your stone fireplace isn’t too difficult, but it is an essential part of its upkeep. It’s also much easier than it might at first seem. However, it can get a little messy. Make sure you cover the surrounding floor with a tarpaulin (if you don’t have one, a series of bin bags or sheeting covering the entire floor area would do) and wear protective clothing. Also, keep children away from the area while cleaning.

Before starting, you will need:

  • A large sheet to spread over the area in front of the fireplace.
  • Rubber gloves and mask.
  • Used coffee grounds.
  • Vacuum cleaner (or dustpan and brush).
  • Durable horsehair brush.
  • Some wipes.
  • Bucket of water and spray can.
  • Household cleaning liquid (eg Cif) or specialized oven cleaner: Check the label of the selected product to determine the best and safest application process.

Caution: Different types of limescale react differently to different cleaning agents. We’ve included a few common types in this article, but always remember to check the label of your chosen product to ensure that it is safe to use. If in doubt, always test the products first on a very small area of ​​the stone. Fireplace design varies from home to home, so some of the features listed here may not be present on yours.

The exact way to clean a stone fireplace depends on the type of stone it is made of: the most important indicator is whether it is igneous or metamorphic (hard, shiny, impermeable stone such as granite, marble or slate) or sedimentary (porous ). , soft and easily scratched stone such as limestone or sandstone). Find out before you start cleaning.

How interested are you in disinfection during cleaning?

Cleaning a stone fireplace

If your fireplace is made of granite or marble, follow the steps below.

  1. It should go without saying, but be sure to put out the fire.
  2. Put a tarp around the fireplace and put on rubber gloves.
  3. Carefully check the ashes/coals/logs in the grate to see if they’re still warm. If so, wait for the fireplace to cool down completely before proceeding.
  4. Remove any logs or coals from the grill.
  5. If you’re using a hoover, simply suck up the loose ash and dust. If you’re using a dustpan and brush, sprinkle some used coffee grounds on the ashes before brushing them up and binning them – it helps to keep the ash from billowing up once disturbed.
  6. Once you’re rid of the majority of the ashes and dust, use your heavy-duty brush to dust down the interior walls of the fireplace. Vacuum or brush off the excess and throw it away.
  7. When facing outward, spray water on any sooty or blackened areas with a spray gun and wipe them off with a cloth. If any smudges or soot spots prove stubborn, apply a little cleaner and scrub a little harder.
  8. If you have screens, grills, or other devices, polish them with a cleaner and plenty of water.
  9. Let everything dry.

How to clean a limestone fireplace

Cleaning a limestone fireplace requires slightly different materials and a little more delicacy. Limestone is much less durable than igneous rock or marble and can be easily damaged by overzealous brushing. The trick is to be gentle and use a slightly softer brush. Follow the steps above, but replace the stiff bristle brush with a softer alternative.

How to clean a sandstone fireplace

Sandstone fireplaces can be particularly difficult to clean. Even light polishing can subsequently damage the delicate sandstone surface and make it more susceptible to future damage. Do not use chemical cleaners for sandstone. They’ll remove discolouration and staining, but they will damage the stone as well.

It is recommended to brush the sandstone fireplaces with soft and delicate movements using a natural bristle brush. Horsehair is fine. If you’re dealing with stubborn stains, ask a professional for advice, but otherwise stick to plain old water.

There you have it: a clean, functional and shiny fireplace!

Bring the glow back to your stone fireplace with these cleaning tips to remove dirt, soot and stains.

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How to clean a limestone fireplace

Welcome fireplace

A floor-to-ceiling stone fireplace adds a warm, welcoming vibe to a screened in porch, with a stone frame incorporating black and white abstract art and modern hand carving.

Photo: Tomas Espinoza / Flynnsideout Productions © 2016, HGTV / Scripps Networks, LLC. All rights reserved

Tomas Espinoza / Flynnsideout Productions, 2016, HGTV / Scripps Networks, LLC. All rights reserved

Several winters of fires can make your fireplace in need of a good cleaning. Smoke and soot can rise and leave dirty limescale behind. You don’t need a pro to put the sparkle back in your fire. Here’s how to clean a stone fireplace.

Place a plastic tarp on the floor to protect it from the cleaner and tape the edges to keep it in place and prevent leaks. You can purchase a commercially available enzymatic cleaner or make your own by mixing trisodium phosphate (a heavy-duty cleaner available at hardware and home improvement stores) with a bucket of warm water. Check the correct proportions on the package. The dirtier the chimney, the stronger it is needed to prepare the solution. Add 2 to 3 ounces of bleach per gallon to your TSP solution. Collect all the remains of fire and ash from inside the fireplace.

Wear protective gloves and goggles to protect your hands and eyes. Make sure you have adequate ventilation by breaking the window. TSP is a powerful cleaner that must be handled with care. Keep a stack of towels handy to catch water stains and splashes during cleaning. If your fireplace is very dirty, apply the cleaning solution with a sponge and let it sit for a few minutes. Then, take the stiff bristle brush (wire bristles are best) and start scrubbing. The stone is porous and sticks to dirt. You’ll need to scrub hard to clean all the nooks and crannies. Scrub the stone and mortar. If streaking occurs while you’re cleaning, dilute the TSP solution with more water.

An important part of knowing how to clean fireplace stone is removing stubborn scrub resistant stains. Make a paste with the water and the TSP and put it on the stained area. Set aside for a few minutes. Scrub hard. You’re going to use a lot of elbow grease on this project.

Finally, rinse the limescale with water to rinse out the cleaning solution. Let the stone dry before removing the plastic sheet. After cleaning the coat, apply an anti-limescale cleaner to make it more resistant to stains. Now that you know how to clean stone fireplace, you’re going to want to do it as infrequently as possible. It’s hard work.

Note: You may want to test some of the cleaning solution on a small spot to make sure it won’t bleach or streak the stone. Apply the solution and allow it to air dry.

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jcim

Member

A few years ago I purchased two large slabs of cut limestone to use as part of my hearth. I wasn’t ready to finish construction yet, so I smoked for two years without having it on site. Now I’m ready and have the boards in place but they have two years of dust and some marks from the cardboard dividers that the seller used in the delivery.

So two things. I have to clean them first. I am only thinking of mild soapy water and perhaps a brass brush, but if there are particular chemicals that are well suited to limestone I am not against the idea.

Secondly, I want to seal it in the best possible way. I didn’t really know what I was getting into when I bought them, and now I realize this material was probably a mistake. The thought of all those pores full of ash and sawdust makes me nervous. I’m almost inclined to put a heavy epoxy coating on it or something else that will be resistant to ash / soot / dust and will last for several years without having to reapply.

Any other tips before walking down that one-way street?

Here’s a quick snapshot to see what I’m getting into. They are two CDs, 2.5’x6’x2 “.

stey

The Minister of Fire

There is a product I used to seal some stone chips for my stone cloak. It’s made by “Tile Guard” and called “Enhance & Seal”. It darkens the rock and seals it. It is best to make an invisible section first to see the results.

Hampton HI300– 26/12/2008
Coating– Everguard 6 "Forever Flex 316 Ti – 26/12/2008
Isolation – Everguard Isolation Mix (Vermiculite) – 5/9/2009
Hat – WhiteHats dual flue chimey cap – 5/9/2009
Shock absorber– Soft plate Roxul – 10.10.2011
BTU holder (10-15 strings at hand)
Install Photos – http: // www. fire. com / econtent / index. php / fora / viewthread / 36245 /

Run
Husky 445-18", Husky 36-16", 5 Ton Task Force Splitter
Winter toy – Polaris 800 Edge from 2004
Nikon D60 for taking all these shots.

2000 m² of heating with three hot women in the house!

Milton Findley

Feeling hot

be green

Moderator

This will make a nice hearth as it is, but will require a sealant, I suspect something silicone based.

These articles should help you:

born379

Guest

Last year, I used something called that to seal my concrete deck. It was about $ 150 for a 5 gallon bucket.

There is a product I used to seal some stone chips for my stone cloak. It’s made by “Tile Guard” and called “Enhance & Seal”. It darkens the rock and seals it. It is best to make an invisible section first to see the results.

jcim

Member

I just wanted to thank you for your contribution. Try a Tile Guard product you may have purchased from DuPont.

We’ll see how it goes!

Wade through A.

Feeling hot

jcim. I’m sorry I didn’t send it sooner

I also have a limestone hearth and understand you may have some teething concerns. I also had these, but thought I might have been overly worried.

My stone is washed with acid, which has a slightly higher consistency. and more micropores for the deposition of soot and ash. I told myself I wasn’t going to sign this first season and see how it went. I’m fine in the second season and I’m still on the border, but I don’t think I can seal it.

My first concern is that any sealant I put on it will cook over heat, possibly degassing or yellowing the finish. I’m going to first cover the stone sample with different coatings, put them under the stove and see what happens. However, I haven’t gotten there yet. If anyone really did this with a limestone slab, I’d love to hear their views on whether they are happy with it or not.

Initially, you will be stressed out by every trace of soot you get on it. This is only part of the patina formation process. Scrub with mild soap and water if it really bothers you, and this will even out dark spots and give the stone a nice shine. It will get a little darker, but like I said, I don’t find it unattractive. If you want to restore its shiny appearance, a little phosphoric acid (a product to remove the haze) will make it sweet. This will also remove that cardboard stain, by the way.

Limestone is more susceptible to scratches and gouges. don’t drop the chimney tool on it and you will be fine.

My advice? Live with it for a while, accept what it is, and you may decide that sealing is not necessary.

Stone fireplaces are a great addition to any home. Read on to find out step by step how to clean the different types of stone fireplaces.

Updated on April 8, 2020

By the Cleanipedia team

Participation

How to clean a limestone fireplace

Cleaning your stone fireplace isn’t too difficult, but it is an essential part of its upkeep. It’s also much easier than it might at first seem. However, it can get a little messy. Make sure you cover the surrounding floor with a tarpaulin (if you don’t have one, a series of bin bags or sheeting covering the entire floor area would do) and wear protective clothing. Also, keep children away from the area while cleaning.

Before starting, you will need:

  • A large sheet to spread over the area in front of the fireplace.
  • Rubber gloves and mask.
  • Used coffee grounds.
  • Vacuum cleaner (or dustpan and brush).
  • Durable horsehair brush.
  • Some wipes.
  • Bucket of water and spray can.
  • Household cleaning liquid (eg Cif) or specialized oven cleaner: Check the label of the selected product to determine the best and safest application process.

Caution: Different types of limescale react differently to different cleaning agents. We’ve included a few common types in this article, but always remember to check the label of your chosen product to ensure that it is safe to use. If in doubt, always test the products first on a very small area of ​​the stone. Fireplace design varies from home to home, so some of the features listed here may not be present on yours.

The exact way to clean a stone fireplace depends on the type of stone it is made of: the most important indicator is whether it is igneous or metamorphic (hard, shiny, impermeable stone such as granite, marble or slate) or sedimentary (porous ). , soft and easily scratched stone such as limestone or sandstone). Find out before you start cleaning.

How interested are you in disinfection during cleaning?

Cleaning a stone fireplace

If your fireplace is made of granite or marble, follow the steps below.

  1. It should go without saying, but be sure to put out the fire.
  2. Put a tarp around the fireplace and put on rubber gloves.
  3. Carefully check the ashes/coals/logs in the grate to see if they’re still warm. If so, wait for the fireplace to cool down completely before proceeding.
  4. Remove any logs or coals from the grill.
  5. If you’re using a hoover, simply suck up the loose ash and dust. If you’re using a dustpan and brush, sprinkle some used coffee grounds on the ashes before brushing them up and binning them – it helps to keep the ash from billowing up once disturbed.
  6. Once you’re rid of the majority of the ashes and dust, use your heavy-duty brush to dust down the interior walls of the fireplace. Vacuum or brush off the excess and throw it away.
  7. When facing outward, spray water on any sooty or blackened areas with a spray gun and wipe them off with a cloth. If any smudges or soot spots prove stubborn, apply a little cleaner and scrub a little harder.
  8. If you have screens, grills, or other devices, polish them with a cleaner and plenty of water.
  9. Let everything dry.

How to clean a limestone fireplace

Cleaning a limestone fireplace requires slightly different materials and a little more delicacy. Limestone is much less durable than igneous rock or marble and can be easily damaged by overzealous brushing. The trick is to be gentle and use a slightly softer brush. Follow the steps above, but replace the stiff bristle brush with a softer alternative.

How to clean a sandstone fireplace

Sandstone fireplaces can be particularly difficult to clean. Even light polishing can subsequently damage the delicate sandstone surface and make it more susceptible to future damage. Do not use chemical cleaners for sandstone. They’ll remove discolouration and staining, but they will damage the stone as well.

It is recommended to brush the sandstone fireplaces with soft and delicate movements using a natural bristle brush. Horsehair is fine. If you’re dealing with stubborn stains, ask a professional for advice, but otherwise stick to plain old water.

There you have it: a clean, functional and shiny fireplace!

How to clean a limestone fireplace

Limestone fireplace surround is another type of setting that is used to decorate the space around the fireplace. This type of fireplace cladding requires special care to keep it clean, as the limestone is white in color. By the way, limestone is considered a suitable material for building fireplaces, but at the same time it is soft and has a lot of spores. So using regular cleaning sprays can also cause discoloration and scratching. Incidentally, placing various accessories such as vases or other decorative items can leave dark spots that may be impossible to clean.

Here is an essential tip when it comes to decorating your fireplace. We have the substance of the countertops to decorate the fireplace. Check for yourself! You can download the How to Clean a Surround Fireplace guide and check out the latest original and creative versions of Limestone Fireplace Surround here.

Photo gallery of the method of cleaning the surrounding environment of a limestone fireplace

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How to clean a limestone fireplace

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