How to change the sand in a pool filter

Before we get into our step by step guide on how to change the sand in a pool filter, you should know that if you have a pool, it is really important that you keep on top of cleaning and maintenance, as these are two things that can easily get out of hand when left unattended.

One of the most important things to keep an eye on is the pool filter, as this is an essential piece of equipment for pool cleaning.

Any and every pool filter will need to be cleaned and the if you have a common pool sand filter, the sand inside will need to be changed every now and then. If it is time for you to do this, you might be left wondering what you are supposed to do…

How to change the sand in a pool filter

To help you to understand how to change the sand in the pool filter, we are going to tell you everything that you need to know in this article.

We will provide you with a step-by-step guide on how to change the sand in your pool filter to make the experience easier.

Table of Contents

How to Properly Change Pool Filter Sand

If you need to change the sand in your pool filter, the first thing that you need to do is open the filter.

Inground Swimming Pool Filters that have the multiport valve mounted on top of them will usually require you to disconnect the plumbing that runs to the valve. We will explain more on opening your filter below.

If you do not have unisions on the pipes, you will need to cut them in order to remove the multiport valve.

You might also want to consider installing unions on these lines to facilitate future service on your filter, but this is totally up to you. Depending on what type of sand filter you have, accessing and replacing the sand may vary. See our guide for each filter type below.

Side Multiport Valve Filters

Filters that have the multiport valve mounted on the side will have either a small top that can be removed, or a tank that is bolted or clamped in the middle, which can be taken apart.

If your filter is a two-piece tank that is bolted or clamped in the middle, you should pull the drain plug first to allow for the water to drain before you pull the tank apart.

Once you have done so, it is quite easy to remove the sand.

Single Piece Filter WIth Top Opening

If your filter is not the two-piece type, but it still has a small opening at the top from either a multiport valve or cover, there are two methods that you can follow to remove the sand.

The first of these methods involves a filter that has a plug at the bottom and allows the sand to flow out. This is usually a larger plug that will be threaded to your winterizing drain plug.

Once you remove this plug, you can use your garden hose to wash out the sand from the tank.

Single Piece Filter Without Drain Plug

If you have a single piece tank that does not have this type of drain plug, then you will need to dig out the sand through the top with a cup.

The first thing you need to do is pull the drain plug to get rid of the water. If there is a top-mounted multiport valve, there will be a stand pipe in the middle of the opening.

Do not try to move this out of the way, as it can cause damage. You will need to dig out the sand with a small cup.

Once you have managed to get rid of enough sand to expose the laterals, you will be able to move the stand pipe out of the way.

If the valve is side-mounted, you will have an overdrain that will fill the opening at the top. This can be removed, usually by unscrewing it.

You will then be able to rotate the pipe that it is connected to by moving it to the side.

Sometimes, the overdrain will be glued to its pipe, which means that you will have to rotate the pipe with overdrain out of the way. You will then be able to dig out the rest of the sand.

Be Gentle With Your Pool Filter Laterals

How to change the sand in a pool filter

You will need to be really careful when you are digging out the sand, as you could otherwise cause damage to the laterals in your filter.

These are very fragile, which is why it is important to take your time and be gentle. This is also the main reason why you shouldn’t use a shovel. Once all of the sand has been removed, you should clean and examine the laterals.

The majority of laterals will unscrew, which makes them really easy to remove from the tank for cleaning. If you have a two-piece tank, then the laterals could snap in instead of being screwed.

If this is the case, you should be able to remove the entire underdrain assembly in one piece.

If they are glued in, you will not be able to pull them off. Make sure to check for any signs of damage. If anything is broken, it will need to be replaced immediately.

Properly Cleaning Pool Filter Laterals

To clean the pool filter laterals, you can soak them in a mixture of muriatic acid and water, especially if there is a lot of dirt on them.

You will also need to thoroughly rinse them afterwards. Once you have done this, you can rinse out the tank and reinstall the clean laterals.

Replacing the Swimming Pool Filter Sand

Once you have followed all of the above steps, you will be ready to replace the sand. You should replace the underdrain assembly, then add water until the tank is half-full to protect the laterals when you add the sand.

After you pour in a bag of sand, level it out before you add the next one. Fill it with sand to the level that is indicated by the manufacturer.

Once the right amount of sand is added, you will need to reassemble the filter tank and/or multiport valve.

You will need to start the system in backwash mode, as this will flush out all of the dust from the sand and allow the sand to completely settle.

For video instructions, check out the step-by-step video by BuildersSA below! Also, we recommend you see our full guide on How To Fully Clean A Sand Pool Filter as well, which goes much more into the cleaning details.

How to change the sand in a pool filter

My name is Denise and I am an Analytical Chemist located in the Kansas City metro area. Some things I am passionate about are gardening, science, swimming, and blogging. I am happy to be part of the All About Pools team & contribute my knowledge & expertise to help swimming pool owners and backyard enthusiasts!

The regular maintenance that you have to do to keep the performance of your sand filter is by changing the sand of the unit. Commonly, once every 3 to 5 years you have to change the sand of your pool filter.

  • Slower performance – Of course, when the sand has been in the filter for too long, it will reduce the performance of the system. You will find that the pool water gets cloudy more often.
  • Leaks on Multiport Valves – One of the factors that cause this problem is the aged sand of the filter.
  • Pressure Issues – As the sand age, you will find the pressure buildup which reduces the filtering performance.

When you are planning on changing the sand in your pool filter, the tutorial on How to Change Sand in Pool Filter below will show you how.

How to Change Sand in Pool Filter

Changing the sand of your pool filter is not a really complicated job that you can get done in no time. There’s no need to call a pro, you just have to prepare some necessary tools and some new packs of sand.

Prepare these supplies:

  • Pool filter sand
  • Duct tape

Prepare these tools:

  • Shop-vac
  • Garden hose
  • Screwdriver
  • Flashlight
  • Backwash hose
  • Utility knife
  • Dust mask

You need to prepare those supplies and tools for this tutorial.

Drain the Filter

  • Find the switch of the filter and turn the filter off.
  • You can also cut the power for more safety.
  • Completely drain the water.

Remove the Multiport Valve and Pipes

  • On top of the filter tank, you will find the clamp that secures the valve, Unscrew the clamp with the screwdriver and remove it.
  • If the pipes come with unions, you can simply disconnect them from the filter. But, you may need to cut it with a saw if they are permanently attached, be careful if you have to cut the pipes or consider calling an expert.
  • To ease the job in the near future, you can install the fittings on the new pipes.
  • Twist the multiport valve gently and lift it carefully. Avoid damaging the part of the filters inside the tank.

Shield the Standpipe

  • Use duct tape to cover the open pipe.
  • Make sure it’s covered properly but also easy to remove.

Remove the Old Sand

  • Insert the nozzle of the shop vac and suck out the old sand inside the tank from the bottom.
  • Do this step gently as you may damaging the fragile components at the bottom of the tank.
  • Wear gloves and mask if necessary.

Clean Up the Tank

  • Use the garden hose to clean out the remaining side inside the tank, you can use a spray nozzle for more effective effort.
  • Clean the outside part of the tank as well.
  • If necessary, you can inspect the remaining sand inside the tank with a flashlight.

Add New Sand

  • Wait, before adding the sand, you need to fill the tank with some water. Just add it a little bit of water which is enough to work as the cushion when the sand touches the bottom of the tank to avoid damaging the laterals.
  • Read the manual of your pool filter to find out the amount of sand that you need.
  • Slowly pour the sand into the filter.
  • If you want to improve the performance of your pool filter, you can mix some cups of Diatomaceous Earth (D.E) powder with the new sand.
  • Fill the tank with water until it reaches the level of the new sand.

Reassemble the Components

After the sand is safely set inside the tank, you have to attach all the components that you have removed. The multiport valve, clamp, and pipes should be secured properly again.

Backwash the Filter

  • Attach the backwash hose to the filter and position the valve to the backwash mode.
  • Turn on the pump for about two minutes.
  • Turn off the pump, position the valve into the rinse mode, and rinse the filter for about 1 minute. See the sight glass to check whether the water is clean enough or not.
  • Turn off the pump.

Enjoy the Filter

  • Position the valve to the filter mode.
  • Turn on the pump again.

So that is the tutorial on How to Change Sand in Pool Filter that you can follow easily!

As a pool owner, you’re no stranger to how important your filter system is. It keeps your pool clean, and your water clear. But every filter eventually needs to have it’s filtering material changed. In this post, we focus on sand pool filters.

[Have a cartridge filter? Check out this post to learn how to replace your pool cartridge filter]

With that said, let’s address the most common questions on the subject:

How often should I change pool filter sand?

It’s recommended to change your pool filter sand every 3 – 5 years.

How do I know if my sand filter needs replacing?

Over time, the sand in your pool filter dulls and it’s ability to capture contaminants decreases. Allowing more debris into your pool. And in some cases, you may notice clumps of sand finding it’s way into your pool. These are telltale signs that your sand filter needs replacing.

In summary, change pool filter sand when your pool is no longer staying clean.

[Want crystal clear water and squeaky clean pool? Follow these pool care tips]

So now that we’ve addressed those important questions, let’s get to the good part. How to change your pool filter sand. We’ve broken the process up into small steps, but it’s overall a fairly simple task.

How To Change Pool Filter Sand

How to change the sand in a pool filter

Turn off pool pump

The very first thing to do is turn off your pool pump. This prevents unfiltered pool water from getting into the filter. It also protects your pool pump from accidental damage.

If your pump were to turn on during the process, it could run dry and break down.

[Experiencing pool pump problems? Learn how to troubleshoot your pool pump]

Drain filter | Remove drain plug

Locate the drain plug at the bottom of your sand filter. Slowly turn the plug counter-clockwise to release any pressure, then fully remove it. You’ll notice water flowing out of the unit.

Wait until all the water is out before moving to the next step.

Remove Multiport Valve

Removing your multiport valve is probably the most extensive work you’ll have to do when you change pool filter sand. So we’ve broken it down:

  • Disconnect hose attached to “WASTE” line
  • Unscrew “PUMP” and “RETURN” port unions
    (If your ports are “permanently” plumbed, and you don not have unions you must cut the pipe. This frees the ports, and allows you to add on unions for easier changes in the future)
  • Remove valve flange clamp (secures multiport valve to filter)
  • Gently twist multiport valve off of standpipe (careful not to damage or crack laterals at bottom)

Cover main pipe inside tank

After removing the multiport valve, you’ll notice a pipe down the middle of the filter. Cover up the opening of the pipe with some duct tape to prevent any sand from entering. If sand gets in, it can clog the laterals and damage the filter.

Remove sand

Now it’s time to get rid of the old sand.

There are a few ways you can approach this. If you happen to have a shop vac, time to let it shine. Otherwise, grab a small plastic cup.

Shop Vac: Stick hose into filter and begin slowly sucking out sand

Cup: Scoop out sand until you reach the bottom

Once you’ve removed most of the sand, you should see a bunch of small plastic PVC fittings attached to the bottom of the standpipe. These are called laterals, and they’re essential to the filtering process. Depending on their condition you may want to remove them and give them a good soak. We recommend doing so if it’s been a few years since you changed your sand. Check for any cracked or damaged laterals as well, and replace them as needed.

*Remove laterals

Begin lifting the standpipe out of the filter.As you get about halfway out, flip each lateral up so that it’s as close to touching the standpipe as possible. This makes it easier for the laterals to clear the small opening at the top of the filter.

-Soak laterals

Soak laterals in a bucket of warm water and cleaning solution to break down any hard clogs or grime.

Rinse out tank with hose

Use a garden hose to rinse out any remaining sand from inside the filter.

Reattach drain plug

With a clean and sand-free filter, it’s time to reattach the drain plug. Carefully screw the plug back in and give it a good tightening once you reach the end of the threading.

Fill tank halfway with water

Begin filling your tank up with water until you reach the halfway point. Once there, carefully replace your standpipe/laterals — making sure to keep them centered. When the pipe is back inside the filter, slowly unfold each lateral back to its original flat position.

Slowly add new sand

You’re almost done. Now it’s time to add new sand. But first, you need to know how much to add.

How much sand goes in a pool filter?

The amount of sand you’ll need is entirely dependent on the size of your pool filter. Usually, each bag of sand is around 50 pounds. Therefore, if you find out the capacity of your filter, you’ll know how many bags of sand you’ll need.

Most average sized Sand Pool Filters will need about 3 bags of sands. But if you can’t figure out how much sand you need, just fill your tank until the sand reaches about 6 inches from the opening.

Fill the tank with one bag at a time. Once you’ve added your sand, you can safely uncover the standpipe.

Reattach Multiport Valve

Replace your multiport valve, securely reattaching all unions, hoses, and clamps.

Backwash filter

Once you’ve properly reattached your multiport valve, turn your pool pump back on, and set your filter to backwash. Backwash the filter for about 2-3 minutes for that last cleaning sweep.

Run The Filter

Last, set the pump to “FILTER” and give yourself a pat on the back. You successfully learned how to change pool filter sand.

Need visual aid?

Our friends at SwimUniversity put together an excellent video that walks you through the process.

Check it out:
pool repair service to do the job. They’ll get it done efficiently and on-time, allowing you to rest easy and enjoy your pool in no time.

[Are you a new pool owner with a lot of questions? Check out our Pool Owner Guide]

How to change the sand in a pool filter

Sand filters for pools are known for typically requiring much less maintenance than other types of pool filtration systems, but they do require some care to stay running at their optimum level. Part of sand filter maintenance involves changing the sand in the filter. Depending on how much your pool is used and what type of filter system you have, the sand will typically need to be replaced about every 5-7 years in order to keep everything running efficiently.

Over time, as the sand in your filter is run through the system, the granules become smoother and the sand filtration process becomes much less efficient. When your sand filter stops working as well, that means it’s pumping harder and harder and overworking to do what should be a simple job. Keeping up with changing the sand on a schedule will help keep everything running smoothly and help to keep your filter running for as long as possible.

Tools You’ll Need:

  • Pool sand
  • Silicon
  • Garden hose & plastic tarp

STEPS FOR CHANGING THE SAND IN A SAND POOL FILTER:

  1. Remove the old sand from the pool filter – You need to remove all of the old sand that is in the tank. To drain it manually, lay plastic sheeting underneath the filter drain assembly, remove the assembly and turn on the pump. This is the fastest, but messiest way to get rid of the sand from your system. For less mess, try removing the drain plug and allowing the sand to drain for a few days.
  2. When removing sand with a scoop or with suction, make sure you don’t hurt the laterals at the bottom of the tank. The unions, couplings and pvc glue can become fragile over time and and can be easily knocked down if you aren’t careful.
  3. Once the sand has been removed, take out the pipe and lateral assembly carefully and soak them in a bucket of cleaning solution. This helps for laterals that have become clogged with and debris. If you noticed any broken or damaged laterals, now is the time to replace them.
  4. Next, replace the drain plugs and use a new layer of silicon sealant to ensure a clean, sealed fit.
  5. Pour water back into the tank so the laterals don’t break when you add the sand.
  6. Now cover the standpipe to prevent sand from getting in. When sand gets in the standpipe and the pump gets turned back on, the laterals won’t get damaged.
  7. Pour in the new sand, making sure to only use specially formulated sand that is graded for pool filters, as any other types of sand can damage your pool filtration system and your pool. Look for pool filter grade silica sand #20, 45-55. Don’t overfill! Always use the amount of sand that the manufacturer recommends – overfilling a sand filter system can lead to damage and unneeded wear and tear.

MAINTAIN YOUR SAND FILTER WELL FOR HEALTHY POOL!

By following these easy steps, you can help your sand pool filtration system run as efficiently as possible and maximize the amount of use you get out of it. When you take care of your pool equipment, it will help take care of your pool.

How to change the sand in a pool filter

Why do I need to change my pool filter sand? Doesn’t sand last forever? Well, the answer to that is yes and no. Yes, sand basically lasts forever but over time, it loses its potency as a filter media. To the naked eye, the sand used in sand filters look just like any old regular sand out there. But under closer inspection, you would find that the grains of sand are actually rough and textured. This roughness is the component that provides the filtering component. The tiny bits of dirt, algae, dead bugs, and other contaminants gets snagged by the tiny burrs on the sand and clean water passes on through.

Over the years, this texture gets smoothed out due to the amount of water passing through. To illustrate this point, try walking down a beach or a stream, notice how almost all of the small rocks have smooth surfaces? This is called weathering. The surfaces of the rocks (and in our case sand) gets smoothed out over the years, and while you’re left with nice smooth sand, it’s useless as a filter media.

How often do I need to change pool filter sand?

Depending on the usage, pool filter sand can go for years without needing a change. Here are MrPoolMan, we recommend that you absolutely change your filter media sand at the very least three years and at seven years at the latest. This will not only ensure that your pool water is filtered optimally, but this keeps the stress on your entire pool system low as well. The best way to tell if your sand filter media is nearing the end of its lifecycle is that your pool may cloud up more often and you’ll notice that you’re shocking your pool more often than normal.

Can I just use any old sand for my pool filter?

Absolutely not. Don’t even try to use regular sand in your sand pool filters because at the very least, it won’t filter your water, but what’s most likely to happen is that it will destroy your entire filtration system.

Types of Sand Filter Media

There are basically three different types of sand filter media that is available out there depending on your needs. Here’s a basic rundown of the different types of filter sand out there.

Silica Sand

This is the most commonly used sand filter media. It’s affordable and it lasts for years. This is made from ground quartz that’s around 0.45-0.55mm in size. The grinding process creates the silica sand grains with jagged edges that makes it the perfect filter media for trapping contaminants in your water. This is usually labelled as “Premium Filter Sand”

Glass Sand

Glass sand filter media comes in two grades, coarse and fine. The coarse grade of glass sand media is usually 1.7mm to 3.4mm in size and is used to cover the under drain and laterals of your sand filter and this grade usually comprises of 30% of your glass sand filter media requirement. Fine grade glass sand is then layered on top of the coarse grade glass sand to complete your setup. Glass sand, while more expensive than your regular silica sand, works much better. It requires less media (by weight) to fill up your sand filter, uses less water than backwashing, relieves pressure on your pumps by providing superior water flow, and it lasts much longer than your traditional silica sand.

Other Sand Media Alternatives

There are other newer sand media alternatives out there which claim to be better than sand glass sand media but until we see real evidence (not just marketing hype) of the media being used for years, we’re holding our judgement and sticking to tried and true silica and glass sand media.

Glass Sand Media Ratios:

Unlike silica sand filter media where you just fill it up, glass sand has a ratio so it’s good to know how much of which grade to buy depending on your filter size.

How to change the sand in a pool filter

Do you want your pool water to be of optimal quality all summer long? Want to know how to properly maintain your filter to get there? You’re in the right place!
Pool filters work thanks to different filtration media, like sand and glass. To maximize the life of your filter and the quality of your water, you must use the right medium and replace it at the right frequency.

Our experts have tackled the matter to answer all your questions!

Why is filtration sand so important?

To the naked eye, the sand you put in a pool filter may appear fairly uniform. However, each grain of sand has a rough texture that allows it to retain fine particles that wander into your pool water. This is how the sand purifies the water and prevents any contaminants from getting through. Over the years, the back and forth movement of water over the sand makes it smoother and smoother, and therefore less and less effective at trapping all those little unwanted particles.

In short, if you never change the sand in your pool filter and it can no longer do its job properly, water quality will be greatly reduced (growth of algae, presence of bacteria, etc.).

Lime scale: a common problem in sand filters

With time, a small amount of limestone clings to the sand grains and accumulates. This causes the sand grains to clump together and become hard and compact.

These sand “clusters” affect filtration quality. In the worst-case scenario, all of the sand in the filter can become one big petrified block and not be effective at all. Regular backwashing and maintenance of the filter and sand with specially designed products are usually sufficient to avoid these problems.

When should you change the filtration sand?

No matter what type of sand you use, it must be changed to keep the filter working properly to remove contaminants from pool water.

A few signs can help you know that it’s time to make the change:

  • The sand has reached its maximum life span. The life span of pool sand is estimated to 3 to 5 years.
  • Compact (sometimes viscous) sand clusters form in the filter.
  • Pool water does not stay clear and clean.
  • Sand accumulates at the bottom of the pool.
  • You must run the pump longer or use more product to maintain water clarity.
  • You have more problems with algae than before.

Can the service life of filtration sand be improved?

Although filtration sand will eventually need to be replaced, proper maintenance of the filter and sand can extend its life, sometimes up to 6 or 7 years. How? With regular backwashing and one or two sand cleanings per summer with specially designed products! Note that you will still need to adjust the amount of sand about every two years.

It is also recommended to use a descaler (to fight limescale), once at the beginning or end of the season and again in midsummer.

Is it possible to use filtration glass in a sand filter?

More and more people are turning to filtration glass as a clean and cost-effective long-term alternative to sand. In fact, here’s how to make the right choice of filtration media for your pool.

The answer to this question is simple: yes, it’s possible! The only thing to remember is that you will need to put about 20% less glass than you put sand into the filtration system. This is because glass is denser than sand and therefore less is needed. We are talking about 50 lb for sand and 42 lb for glass.

Glass meets all of the pool filter manufacturer’s standards and will not cause any problems with warranties.

Change the filtration sand when the time comes.

Now you know when to change the sand in your pool filter and why it is important. Changing the sand in a pool filter is an operation that can usually be done in one day with a few common tools. Follow the instructions of your pool filter manufacturer or contact an expert to help you choose your filtration product!

How to change the sand in a pool filter

If you’re a pool owner, then you know just how important regular maintenance and proper upkeep is. There’s a lot of work that goes into keeping your pool functioning properly, and one important task is to ensure that the sand filter isn’t malfunctioning. To know whether it’s functioning or not, you need to know what signs to be on the lookout for.

Knowing how to tell if your sand filter is bad is one of the best ways to keep your pool clean and safe. If you’re not sure what signs to look for, then you’ll want to keep reading below. We’ve created a list of the top 7 common pool filter issues that you need to know about.

Here are the problems that you need to keep an eye out for!

1. A Slow Sand Filter

If your swimming pool begins to seem a bit cloudy or unclear, then you may have a sand filter that’s running slowly. This can happen even though your sand filter looks fine and seems to be running as it should. It can look like how it’s supposed to but not be filtering debris from your pool as it should.

If you’re suspicious of this, the first thing you should do is test the water chemistry. Be sure that the balance is correct. Now you should check with the backwash valve.

Make sure that it’s working in a correct manner as well and that the flow rate is where it should be. If you still haven’t found a problem, then consider changing out the pool filter sand inside your sand filter.

2. Leaking Multiport Valves

Leaking multiport valves isn’t a direct issue with the sand filter, but it’s related to the sand filter, so you should check this out as well. The multiport valves are attached to the sand filter on the sides or on the top of it. The spider gasket is located inside of the sand filter tank, and its job is to keep a consistent flow of water through it to the correct ports.

Sometimes, however, problems with this gasket occur due to it being old and worn down, becoming loose, or even twisted. When this happens, water is forced through other ports, creating issues with the multiport valves. If this is the case, your filter won’t function as it should and your pool will become murky or cloudy.

3. Broken or Bad Laterals

When the laterals on the sand filter are broken or bad, the sand returns to the pool. If this is the issue on hand, then you might need to prepare for some labor. To check the lateral to see if it’s gone bad, you need to remove all of the media from the pool filter.

If the lateral is broken or bad, it’s a quick task to replace it. The hardest part is removing the media to get to it. You can also consider checking the air relief tube.

This part is much easier to get to, and you won’t have to worry too much about taking the sand filter apart.

4. Dirty Sand Filter

If you’ve noticed that the backwashing cycles have become shorter, then you should check to see if the sand filter is dirty or greasy. If the filter is dirty or greasy, then don’t be surprised if it takes on the appearance of sandy lard. When this happens, the water doesn’t flow through the sand filter media.

Instead, it’s forced to create a channel down the side of the filter and then returns back to the pool. You can purchase a sand filter cleaner that will help the situation for a bit of time, but this is only temporary. For a permanent fix, you should replace the pool filter sand.

5. Valve Failure

Valve failure can happen due to tree damage, from freezing, or from becoming deadheaded. The valves are the multiports located on either the top or sides of the sand filter tank. However, the most common problem is the failure of the gaskets inside of the tank that then causes the valves on the outside to fail.

If this happens, the problem is more serious and will need immediate correcting.

6. Tank Failure

Tank rupture can happen when the valves are closed off after the filter on the backwash lines or return lines. Because of this, you want to keep an eye on the pressure gauges when you turn the pump on. If while doing this you notice that the pressure begins to rise, then you should shut the pump off as fast as possible.

You then want to check for closed valves. However, problems with the tank’s valves aren’t the only cause for a tank failure. In some cases, if the tank is a cheaper version, it may bust at the seams.

Either way, both of these problems are serious and will require a replacement if they occur.

7. Pressure Issues

Speaking of the pressure, always check the pressure to ensure that it’s where it should be. A filter that’s too small for the pump can cause a build-up of pressure inside the tank. This is due to the fact that the pump is pushing more water through than the tank can handle.

The pressure could also be high due to a dirty filter that needs to be rinsed. However, low pressure is also an issue. If the pressure is low, check to ensure that nothing is stopping the water from going into the filter such as debris.

Correct any of these issues to ensure the pressure goes back to normal.

Do You Know How to Tell If Your Sand Filter is Bad?

If you’re a pool owner, then you need to know how to tell if your sand filter is bad. Knowing what signs to look for is going to help you keep your sand filter running as smoothly as possible.

Now that you know the signs, you can work towards keeping a clean and safe pool, but sometimes you need help from the professionals. Here at Sahara Construction and Custom Pools, we’re dedicated to servicing and maintaining your pool correctly.

See what services we offer and contact us to see how we can start helping you maintain your pool today!

How to change the sand in a pool filter

Sand filters for pools are known for typically requiring much less maintenance than other types of pool filtration systems, but they do require some care to stay running at their optimum level. Part of sand filter maintenance involves changing the sand in the filter. Depending on how much your pool is used and what type of filter system you have, the sand will typically need to be replaced about every 5-7 years in order to keep everything running efficiently.

Over time, as the sand in your filter is run through the system, the granules become smoother and the sand filtration process becomes much less efficient. When your sand filter stops working as well, that means it’s pumping harder and harder and overworking to do what should be a simple job. Keeping up with changing the sand on a schedule will help keep everything running smoothly and help to keep your filter running for as long as possible.

Tools You’ll Need:

  • Pool sand
  • Silicon
  • Garden hose & plastic tarp

STEPS FOR CHANGING THE SAND IN A SAND POOL FILTER:

  1. Remove the old sand from the pool filter – You need to remove all of the old sand that is in the tank. To drain it manually, lay plastic sheeting underneath the filter drain assembly, remove the assembly and turn on the pump. This is the fastest, but messiest way to get rid of the sand from your system. For less mess, try removing the drain plug and allowing the sand to drain for a few days.
  2. When removing sand with a scoop or with suction, make sure you don’t hurt the laterals at the bottom of the tank. The unions, couplings and pvc glue can become fragile over time and and can be easily knocked down if you aren’t careful.
  3. Once the sand has been removed, take out the pipe and lateral assembly carefully and soak them in a bucket of cleaning solution. This helps for laterals that have become clogged with and debris. If you noticed any broken or damaged laterals, now is the time to replace them.
  4. Next, replace the drain plugs and use a new layer of silicon sealant to ensure a clean, sealed fit.
  5. Pour water back into the tank so the laterals don’t break when you add the sand.
  6. Now cover the standpipe to prevent sand from getting in. When sand gets in the standpipe and the pump gets turned back on, the laterals won’t get damaged.
  7. Pour in the new sand, making sure to only use specially formulated sand that is graded for pool filters, as any other types of sand can damage your pool filtration system and your pool. Look for pool filter grade silica sand #20, 45-55. Don’t overfill! Always use the amount of sand that the manufacturer recommends – overfilling a sand filter system can lead to damage and unneeded wear and tear.

MAINTAIN YOUR SAND FILTER WELL FOR HEALTHY POOL!

By following these easy steps, you can help your sand pool filtration system run as efficiently as possible and maximize the amount of use you get out of it. When you take care of your pool equipment, it will help take care of your pool.