How to change colors in knitting

Published in Last update: March 16, 2021 Categories Knitting techniques

How to change colors in knitting

Find out how to change the yarn in knitting projects.

Swapping ball to ball is much easier than you think! Changing the color of your yarn is a really fun way to personalize any knit pattern. Of course, this technique helps when you’re starting a new ball of yarn of the same color, too.

Read on for step-by-step instructions on how to easily change yarns when knitting, plus a full video tutorial below!

How to change colors in knitting

HOW TO CHANGE THE COLORS OF THE YARN DURING PUNCHING IN 4 SIMPLE STEPS?

Let’s start with my little pink knitted swatch that’s ready to change color. Rather than continuing to knit with the original pink yarn that’s attached to the ball, I’m happy to share how we are going to be changing yarn color knitting with a second color in white.

How to change colors in knitting

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STEP 1: INSERT A NEW YARN

  • To start changing the thread color, make a small loop with a new thread.
  • No commitment, nothing difficult. Just a little crochet and we pass it to the right needle.
  • Hold the yarn with your right hand when knitting.

How to change colors in knittingHow to change colors in knittingHow to change colors in knitting

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STEP 2: KNITTING A NEW YARN

  • Work the second color of the yarn.
  • Now you only work the second color of the thread (white). Is simple?

How to change colors in knitting

_____

STEP 3: CONTINUE SEWING WITH NEW YARN

  • Continue working with the new yarn color.
  • And when we part, we’ll just make that first white dot of the second color, keeping everything nice and tight.

How to change colors in knitting

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STEP 4: CUT AND FLY IN THE OLD ENDS OF THE YARN

  • When you’re ready, cut the original thread color and thread the ends.

HOW TO CHANGE THE COLORS OF THE YARNS?
Click here to see the full video step by step

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT HORIZONTAL STRIPE WORK

I love to mix my knitting, changing the color of the yarn when I work in stripes. Now that you’re ready to change yarn colors, you may be interested in taking a close look at more helpful knitting techniques when knitting with different yarn colors:

Top 5 tips for knitting stripes: You will love my top 5 tips for working in rows! Start by looking at the easiest ways to create horizontal flat knit stripes on straight knitting needles with really simple knitting patterns and purl stitches.

How to remove the reverse dashed lines: You’re going to love my simple trick on how to remove purl dash lines when changing colors in knit stitch patterns that have a combination of both knits and purls in the same row. My trick will help you create an invisible color change in knitting, it will help you knit stripes every time.

How to wear the yarn to the side of your work: Carry yarn up the side of your work with confidence the next time you’re knitting two or more colors. Check out this simple knitting technique in action!

How to change colors in knitting

THANK YOU FOR VISITING STUDIO KNIT

Hope you go ahead and change the yarn colors. It’s a really fun way to personalize any knitting pattern of your choice. And be sure to check out my 5 best striped knitting tips for even easier tricks. I hope you will be inspired by a little courage and a change in the color of the yarns.

If you’d like even more, please make sure you join my mailing list. Subscribing to my Studio Knit YouTube channel is another easy and free way to stay connected and support my work.

Published in Last update: March 16, 2021 Categories Knitting techniques

How to change colors in knitting

Find out how to change the yarn in knitting projects.

Swapping ball to ball is much easier than you think! Changing the color of your yarn is a really fun way to personalize any knit pattern. Of course, this technique helps when you’re starting a new ball of yarn of the same color, too.

Read on for step-by-step instructions on how to easily change yarns when knitting, plus a full video tutorial below!

How to change colors in knitting

HOW TO CHANGE THE COLORS OF THE YARN DURING PUNCHING IN 4 SIMPLE STEPS?

Let’s start with my little pink knitted swatch that’s ready to change color. Rather than continuing to knit with the original pink yarn that’s attached to the ball, I’m happy to share how we are going to be changing yarn color knitting with a second color in white.

How to change colors in knitting

_____

STEP 1: INSERT A NEW YARN

  • To start changing the thread color, make a small loop with a new thread.
  • No commitment, nothing difficult. Just a little crochet and we pass it to the right needle.
  • Hold the yarn with your right hand when knitting.

How to change colors in knittingHow to change colors in knittingHow to change colors in knitting

_____

STEP 2: KNITTING A NEW YARN

  • Work the second color of the yarn.
  • Now you only work the second color of the thread (white). Is simple?

How to change colors in knitting

_____

STEP 3: CONTINUE SEWING WITH NEW YARN

  • Continue working with the new yarn color.
  • And when we part, we’ll just make that first white dot of the second color, keeping everything nice and tight.

How to change colors in knitting

_____

STEP 4: CUT AND FLY IN THE OLD ENDS OF THE YARN

  • When you’re ready, cut the original thread color and thread the ends.

HOW TO CHANGE THE COLORS OF THE YARNS?
Click here to see the full video step by step

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT HORIZONTAL STRIPE WORK

I love to mix my knitting, changing the color of the yarn when I work in stripes. Now that you’re ready to change yarn colors, you may be interested in taking a close look at more helpful knitting techniques when knitting with different yarn colors:

Top 5 tips for knitting stripes: You will love my top 5 tips for working in rows! Start by looking at the easiest ways to create horizontal flat knit stripes on straight knitting needles with really simple knitting patterns and purl stitches.

How to remove the reverse dashed lines: You’re going to love my simple trick on how to remove purl dash lines when changing colors in knit stitch patterns that have a combination of both knits and purls in the same row. My trick will help you create an invisible color change in knitting, it will help you knit stripes every time.

How to wear the yarn to the side of your work: Carry yarn up the side of your work with confidence the next time you’re knitting two or more colors. Check out this simple knitting technique in action!

How to change colors in knitting

THANK YOU FOR VISITING STUDIO KNIT

Hope you go ahead and change the yarn colors. It’s a really fun way to personalize any knitting pattern of your choice. And be sure to check out my 5 best striped knitting tips for even easier tricks. I hope you will be inspired by a little courage and a change in the color of the yarns.

If you’d like even more, please make sure you join my mailing list. Subscribing to my Studio Knit YouTube channel is another easy and free way to stay connected and support my work.

Posted on April 25, 2019 1 min to read

Whether you’re a knitting newbie or a craft connoisseur, working in beautifully bright and fabulously fun colours is the simplest way to give your projects pizzazz! Learn how to change colours in knitting and you’ll open up a whole new realm of possibilities.

The simplest way to introduce color is to create stripes, working with one color at a time to create a fabric. Joining a new colour isn’t as hard as you think, as you’ll learn in our super simple step-by-step guide.

How to change colors in knitting step by step

Insert the needle into the first stitch, slip a new color on the tip of the right needle and knit the first stitch.

Take a short distancetaking it lengthwise and placing it on the needle.

Keeping the shorter length down, work the next stitch, pick up the short garment a second time.

To repeatintertwining the end with 8 stitches until it is fixed.

Advice for professionals

Avoid joining the threads in the middle of a row as it can be difficult to keep the knot and loose ends from exposing. Don’t work the old and the new yarn together for a few stitches in order to secure ends. This will give you double the thickness and create an uneven fabric.

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How to change colors in knitting

Rzemiosło spwierkowe / Sarah E. White

There are many different colored knitting techniques that allow you to make basic knitting projects that much more interesting. From striped knitting or using multicolored yarns to intricate knitting and intarsia projects, there are plenty of ways to lighten up your knitting that isn’t necessarily difficult. Here are a few.

Multicolored yarn

Working with multicolored yarns is the easiest way to add color to your projects because you don’t even have to think about it; knit as usual.

Whether the yarn is multicolored (a series of colors that are often random) or that it tears automatically, working a design with this type of yarn makes it look a lot more complicated than it is and adds a bit of pizazz to even a regular one. jersey stitch.

Knitted stripes

Adding stripes to the knitting pattern is not that difficult, just remember to change the colors at the end of the round or round. If you’re working in stockinette stitch or a similar stitch and don’t want to see a dotted line where the colors change, start a new color from the stitch row. However, sometimes you may want to use this line as a design element. Patterns that include stripes can be a striped baby blanket with garter stitch or a classic striped sock.

Duplicate point

Using a duplicate stitch is a fun and easy way to add color to your knitting project after the fact. You can use as many duplicate stitches as you like in the design, but remember that seams make the work more voluminous and a little stiffer than without that extra layer of stitching.

A double stitch is also a great way to add more personality to your designs, just like with animal hat patterns.

Knit with a slip stitch

Slip stitch knitting seems more complicated as it uses multiple colors of yarn to create patterns, but you only work with one color at a time. The remaining points are joined so that the color of the previous row is visible on these points, creating interesting patterns.

This technique is also known as knitting mosaic, which is actually a specific technique popularized by Barbara G. Walker. It consists of designs which can be worked over any number of stitches and are shown in the diagram with the left side needle worked the same way as the right side.

Fair Isle or braided knit

Knitting with yarn, also sometimes referred to as Fair Isle, is a relatively easy way to combine two colors on the same row of knitted fabrics.

By holding a thread in each hand or dropping and picking up colors when you need them, the unused color is woven through the back of the shirt giving you a thick double layer of knit fabric that feels very warm.

This technique is useful for simple patterns that are only a few stitches wide and repeat over and over.

Knitted inlay

Inlay knitting, or knitting with images, is a way to add more complex, larger patterns that don’t cover the full width of a knitting project. Each color is worked as a block, with a different thread each time a color appears in the design.

For example, if there is a red pattern in the center of two brown knit sections, you will need three threads, one red and two brown to make the pattern.

Entrelac in jersey

Entrelac doesn’t necessarily have to be done in color, but the intertwining patterns have traditionally been done in at least two colors.

One of the really cool ways to make an entrelac, which is also quite easy, is to use multi-colored or self-stripping yarn to make squares and triangles that add a lot of color without any extra work.

I love to knit hats with stripes in the round. Stripes are a quick and easy way to add color to your design and are also a great way to use those knick knacks in your stash!

The problem with circular knitting and stripes is that you get a little jog in the color—the first stitch in the row above a color change is actually the last stitch of the previous row of color, so it looks like you didn’t change colors soon enough. (This happens because when you’re knitting in the round you’re actually knitting a spiral, not a circle.)

When I complete a hat I always notice these jogs, but I’ve never known what to do about them. And, between you and me, I’m not a perfectionist knitter, so I give it the old shoulder shrug and move on.

However, even non-perfectionists love to hone their skills, so when I saw this video tutorial on straps without circular crochet jogging, I was intrigued. In this clip, Eunny Jang shows us two ways to avoid jogging with the slip stitch technique that works for any belt width and the “barber’s court” technique for single circular stripes.


This video is taken from episode 311 of Knitting Daily TV, which tells the lines and the different ways to work them.

Hope these tips help you knit round strips on knitting needles!

(Originally published July 2009; updated May 2016)

Some knitters seem intimidated by the color change in the middle of a row or round, but developing this simple skill will allow you to really experiment with different patterns for your work. Everything from knitting a blanket with integrated hem to a truly fabulous Fair Isle sweater.

Knitting with 2 colors in the same row or round dates back to at least 1500. The Museum of London collection boasts an adorable Tudor children’s glove. This simple glove has only 3 rounds of decoration around the cuff, one of which changes to lighter and darker browns in each spot. The name of the Fair Isle technique – yarn knitting – comes from a tiny island in the north of Scotland where the technique was popularized (and some say it has been improved upon).

How to change colors in knitting

How to change colors in knitting

Color change

To change color in the middle of a row or at any time while working in the round, just delete the old color and pick up a new one. It may seem like an oversimplification, but I can assure you that it really is that simple. You can use this technique to create stripes when you work over and over, or to create an integrated hem on a blanket or sweater. There is a caveat to this simplicity: if you repeatedly change color in the same spot vertically, you need to make sure you grab the new thread by going under the old one (so you don’t make a hole).

Start by throwing the required number of stitches for any weight of yarn and a needle size convenient for that yarn. In my example I’ve chosen Red Heart Soft in Turquoise and Light Grey and size 8 needles.

When you get to the point where you need to change the color, drop the first color and pick up the second.

How to change colors in knitting

When you’re ready to go back to your main color, pick it up from the bottom and keep working.

How to change colors in knitting

Fair Isle Jersey

Knitting a Fair Isle is as simple as using 2 colors in the same row or round multiple times. Both colors will be used during the round or row, so you will wear both colors during your work. Due to the specific nature of Fair Isle knitting, it is easier to work in the round, which allows you to work all rounds to get a jersey stitch (instead of knitting one row and purl the next row as if you were yourself. working in flat stockinette stitch).

Work as described above, choosing the color from the bottom but wearing both garments on / around the piece.

How to change colors in knitting

Advice

A good practice when changing colors is to capture the “new” color from below. This will ensure that there are no holes in your work.

Wearing a thread on the wrong side will make it “float”. Try not to over-tighten the stitches or you will drop the threads. This way the floats will appear on the inside (back / reverse) of your work.

How to change colors in knitting

When building a blueprint, the blueprint will appear, round after round.

How to change colors in knitting

Advice

When colors change frequently, the floats will naturally be short, but long floats can get caught in objects, which can ruin the fabric of the finished object.

Reading the chart

Most Fair Isle knitting patterns come with a chart (see below for examples of simple two-color charts). The graph is a visual representation of the saved pattern. Some models do not include written instructions for Fair Isle models.

How to change colors in knitting

In the diagram, each square is knit 1. Each stitch on the knitting needles will be color coded to show which color to work with. You may find it useful to enter numbers for any rows that aren’t marked (and columns in the repetition, for that matter).

Advice

You may find it helpful to use a sticky note to cover the lines you have already worked out.

As mentioned above Fair Isle is usually worked in the round so you can read the diagram from right to left and bottom up as you knit.

How to change colors in knitting

Advice

If you have found a Fair Isle pattern worked flat, you will read the diagram as if it shows RS, in front of you. Therefore, read first as you knit, right to left. When working flat, the second row will be worked straight from left to right.

How to change colors in knitting

Fair Isle or Thread Knit is a fun and relatively easy way to add color to your designs by working multiple threads in two different colors on the same row, keeping both threads connected to your knitting at all times.

Once you’ve mastered the basics of how to knit a yarn, it’s easy enough to do this technique successfully, but here are a few tips that may help you.

How to make a colorful knitted fabric work smoothly?

The biggest problem for most people who are just starting to work threading is that they have to pull the threads too hard when switching from one thread to the other. The floats on the back of the work must be flexible enough to allow the front of the work to remain flat.

If your work wrinkles or looks like an accordion folded sheet of paper, you are pulling too hard. Rip and try again.

On the other hand, the floats shouldn’t be so loose that they can catch parts of your body when trying to wear what you’re knitting (it’s also just a waste of yarn). Make sure that the previously worked stitches are well hidden on the needle before knitting the first stitch of the next color. This should give you enough, but not much, flexibility in swimming.

Color changes

Another potential big problem or confusing one with the new Fair Isle jerseys is how to handle two different colors of yarn. Is there a correct way to switch between them?

Some sources say you should always take a fresh thread from under the thread you just worked with to make sure no holes are formed in the knitted fabric. It’s good practice, but it turns your working threads into a mess when they twist and twist each other.

A less crazy approach is to choose one color that will always be worn on top and the other color that will always be worn on top. This is basically what you do when you knit both English and Continental at the same time, holding a thread in each hand.

As long as you are constantly knitting one color with one hand and the other, this will prevent holes from forming and the yarn twisting. It’s also much faster because you don’t need to pick up a thread, work stitches, drop that thread, then pick up another thread, work it, and so on.

Also remember, since most stitches in the yarn are worked in the round, where you change the needles the threads will want a sharper angle, making the weave tighter than otherwise. You can pay close attention to the first stitches of each color on each new strand so that the back strands look the same as the rest of the strands.

I love to knit hats with stripes in the round. Stripes are a quick and easy way to add color to your design and are also a great way to use those knick knacks in your stash!

The problem with circular knitting and stripes is that you get a little jog in the color—the first stitch in the row above a color change is actually the last stitch of the previous row of color, so it looks like you didn’t change colors soon enough. (This happens because when you’re knitting in the round you’re actually knitting a spiral, not a circle.)

When I complete a hat I always notice these jogs, but I’ve never known what to do about them. And, between you and me, I’m not a perfectionist knitter, so I give it the old shoulder shrug and move on.

However, even non-perfectionists love to hone their skills, so when I saw this video tutorial on straps without circular crochet jogging, I was intrigued. In this clip, Eunny Jang shows us two ways to avoid jogging with the slip stitch technique that works for any belt width and the “barber’s court” technique for single circular stripes.


This video is taken from episode 311 of Knitting Daily TV, which tells the lines and the different ways to work them.

Hope these tips help you knit round strips on knitting needles!

(Originally published July 2009; updated May 2016)

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