How to buy nothing

Some people have reevaluated their attitude towards things in 2020. Here’s what they learned.

"How

by Britannia Robinson

Elizabeth Chai has decided that in 2020 she will buy nothing but food, coffee, cosmetics (if she is missing something essential) and occasional services such as a haircut. She would resist the temptation to replenish her wardrobe or buy anything for her house. She would fix things or she would borrow them instead of buying new ones and she would get rid of things she already had; Her goal was 2020 items sold, given away or discarded.

Its commitment to "not buy" was inspired by a desire to minimize its impact on the planet and to better appreciate what it already has. She talked to some friends about the project and made a list of rules against which to be responsible.

This was before the pandemic forced many people around the world to return home for much of the year. Three months after her experiment, Chai, 40, who works as a graphic designer in Portland, Oregon, found herself surrounded only by her things, without escaping or diversifying her normal life.

But she stuck to the commitment, regularly donating or selling things she didn’t need and resisting temptations to purchase New ones. Instead of buying stuff, she’s been making a list. If she still wants something on her list at the end of the year, perhaps she’ll treat herself in 2021. What she learned is that temptations fade surprisingly fast.

In the early closure of Covid-19, total consumer spending decreased, but online shopping increased. And despite the cascade of job losses and waves of financial uncertainty, consumer spending on goods increased by about 7% from January to September. (Household clothes, exercise equipment, robot vacuums, and vibrators are some of the products that have sold well this year.)

Even so, some have found consuming more stressful and tense than ever. More and more people are learning how consumption and waste are contributing to the climate crisis and there is growing aversion to companies getting rich when so many people struggle. Buying something already seemed like a moral mystery. The pandemic introduced additional questions of how and what to buy without potentially putting others in harm’s way.

Nivi Achanta, who lives in Seattle, is interested in becoming a better consumer. In August, she had to rethink her spending habits when she lost her job at the technology consulting agency she had been working for since 2017; era il suo primo lavoro dopo il college e i soldi erano buoni. Ma la signora Achanta, 25, said she was often frustrated by a disconnect between the company’s stated values and what they actually prioritized. They talked about high social issues, but when it got to the point, the profit always came first. "And I only made the rich rich," she said.

SM. Achanta figured she’d make money first and focus on making a difference later. However, job loss forced this change much earlier. In September, she began working full-time on The Soapbox Project, a platform to inform and guide action on a wide range of social justice issues.

In an article she wrote for The Soapbox Project on sustainable Christmas gifts, Ms. Achanta didn’t mention a number of eco-friendly products that people can bow to, instead she wrote, “The best way to be sustainable is to stop buying things. . "Her gift suggestions include digital subscriptions and educational resources, as well as some products that replace the disposable versions. (It’s also a practical point: Ms. Achanta went from a six-figure salary to earning a few hundred dollars. per month and live off his savings.)

Through The Soapbox Project, Ms. Achanta aims to educate readers on practical ways to reduce their impact on the planet, whether they’re money-related or not. For example, she’s writing a lot about buying things secondhand. “Now I’m really following through on that advice, because it’s environmentally and financially responsible," she said.

Cynthia Tina, director of communications at the Foundation for Intentional Communities, sees another option for guilty consumers: joining intentional communities where goods are often shared, manufactured and exchanged among members. "Not everyone has to have their own lawn mower or washing machine," she said.

Intentional communities include both economically self-sufficient municipalities with their own income systems and urban housing complexes with shared living spaces. But sharing resources almost always means sharing germs as well. Thus, while some smaller rural communities have benefited from the security of isolation and a closed set of social interactions, others have struggled to balance the differing expectations of social distancing among members.

However, Tina, 27, has seen interest in living together this year, especially in terms of sharing resources. This year, she herself moved into the purposeful community of Headwaters Garden and Learning Center, an eco-village in Cabot, Virginia. She said she was building her house there – powered by the sun, made of straw and clay – surrounded by land where she and other community members grow and share food.

Questo non l’ha esonerata dal dover comprare cose o assumere persone per fornire servizi, specialmente quando si tratta di costruire una casa, ma ha detto che l’ha aiutata a vivere "alla periferia della realtà capitalista dalle nove alle cinque".

"How

Not buying anything new is a challenge you set yourself, it basically does what it says on the package: you don’t buy anything new for a long time. A lot of people do a month over October, others really test themselves by trying to do a whole year, and if you’re one Lindsay McDougallYou haven’t bought new clothes with Frenzal Rhomb for almost 20 years.

Here are some of the best tips and tricks from two people who aren’t looking to buy anything new this year that sounds overwhelming, but it’s definitely possible.

1. Find out what works for you

The most important part of taking on a challenge like this is making it achievable, not trying to do something crazy because you risk failing.

You need to figure out what’s driving you, and let that tailor how you’re going to change your shopping habits. Maybe it’s no New clothes or nothing New at EVERYTHING, there are no hard and fast rules, apart from limiting consumption.

For the Melbourne-based Department of Transportation and LogisticsBrooke Walkerit was about recognizing and accepting your life as an over-shopper who leads a busy life and works this way.

"Mi è piaciuta molto l’idea di provare uno stile di vita senza sprechi", ha detto.

"Ma avendo due lavori ed essendo povero sia in termini di tempo che di denaro, ho scoperto che mi sto preparando ad essere deluso quando so che non è appropriato per il mio stile di vita in questo momento".

She also claimed that shopping and in-person shopping made her more aware of her purchases, rather than just throwing something into an online cart and thinking about it when it shows up.

Have you ever wondered whatBuy the Nothing group Self? Find out how to declutter, save money, and make friends with a Buy the Nothing group.

"How

Did you want to try but don’t know what to expect?

"How

Do you have a lot of good things that you no longer need that you would like to give to someone else?

Buy the Nothing groups are local Facebook groups which allow people to exchange items for free. According to the Buy Nothing Project website, the group’s policies are:

“Post anything you’d like to give away, lend, or share amongst neighbors. Ask for anything you’d like to receive for free or borrow. Keep it legal. Keep it kind. No buying or selling, no trades or bartering, we’re strictly an economy of gifts"

If you’re trying to declutter and/or save money, Buy the Nothing groups will help you reach your goals. Plus, you meet people in your community that you may never have met before.

Related post

How did I start joining the group without purchasing anything?

I joined my local Buy the Nothing group because I was feeling guilty for throwing things away. I wanted to clean our house but some of the things I had could not be donated and certainly could not be sold. I ended up throwing a lot of good stuff away, or I kept it even though we didn’t need it.

I found my group by looking on the Buy Nothing page. There I found the information I needed to join a group in my city.

When I started in my group, I tried to lie down in silence for a while and see what people were like. People would request certain items, and if I had them (and we didn’t need them), I donated items to group members.

My first “gift" was a mini ironing board that I’ve only used two or three times. I’ve had it since I was in college…and I’m in my 40s now. Ora è il momento di trasmetterlo e I never would have considered getting rid of it if it weren’t for my Buy the Nothing group.

Kiedy wymieniłem swój pierwszy „prezent", byłem zdenerwowany, że nikt go nie zechce. Ho fatto una foto, ho scritto una descrizione e ho aspettato. Per fortuna qualcuno lo voleva ed è stato bravo a ritirarlo in tempo.

After I was more comfortable with the group, I started doing “asks" Before I bought something, I’d post to the group if I thought it might be something people might have and want to get rid of.

My last request was for some dirt. Someone gave it to me and I was pleasantly surprised when he told me that he wanted to give me a huge sack of land! I’ve used that soil to start vegetable gardening in our backyard.

I love that my Buy the Nothing group helps connect stuff to the people who need it.

Not everything is perfect

There are some people who get angry when they are not chosen for a gift, luckily our group has a great moderator who reminds us of this.“it’s just stuff"But it suppresses things when people get nervous.

There are some who give more than others and some who take more than others. Within the parameters of the group, it’s not supposed to matter. There’s no keeping score.

Sometimes people fall and don’t show up. Or I won’t answer you. You have to go with the flow and not be nervous.

Related post

Don’t buy groups that reduce a lot of waste

Being inmy group prevented me from throwing away so many things.If we multiply that by the 400 members of our area, we get a lot of excellent stuff and get used to it instead of going to the landfill.

I had no intention of bringing new things to our home through the group, but I chose a few things that kept me from spending my money.

One of the best parts of being in a group that I absolutely didn’t expect was:get to know my city a little better.

I tend to stick to my routine and my regular itineraries. Thanks to the group, I have traveled to neighborhoods I never would have known and made new friends, all to convey some pretty good things to the people who will use them.

In 2017, we took up the challenge of buying nothing new for the entire calendar year. We wanted to break away from the consumerism that surrounds us on a daily basis. We hoped that if we didn’t buy anything new during the year, it would help us spend our money more consciously.

We got itfive strategiesto help us avoid purchasing new items:

  1. Wear – do not replace items until they no longer perform their function
  2. Repair: If possible, repair broken / broken components instead of replacing them
  3. Change of Destiny: Do we already have something that can satisfy the use of this item?
  4. Self-sourcing: can we make it ourselves with other materials?
  5. Buy used – can we find what we need instead of a new one?

While these strategies were useful, we knew there would be exceptions. Chris and I thought through it and came up with 4 exceptionswhich we felt in line with our values:

  • Underwear, socks and shoes
  • Photographic prints (school photos and photos for our roadmap)
  • Car maintenance parts (we know we will need new tires next year)
  • Home renovation (we had to finish the ongoing projects)

Our experience

Chris and I were really optimistic when we started on January 1st 2017. We even obeyed the rules! We did buy New carbon monoxide detectors, which weren’t on the exception list. But it was a safety concern for our family and deemed necessary New buy. For the next two months, we stayed focused and never broke our challenge rules. We entered the fourth month thinking this challenge would be easy for our minimalist family.

Then my computer’s power cord finally gave out. We talked about buying used but we have already done it and it didn’t take long. So we broke the challenge for a good cause, buying a brand spanking New mac laptop power cord! It was a justified buy. But that’s the problem right? Once an excuse is found, many more will follow. I bought one of our children a costume as a birthday present. I told myself it was an experience, but let’s be honest – it was an item! And it was so New.

The next month I bought some stainless steel straws. I still love them to this day, but it honestly was an impulse buy. A week later, I found myself at a pity party. All my clothes looked worn and frayed. I felt exhausted and distracted. I had some business to attend to and decided to go to one of my favorite stores. I left with a $ 80 summer dress for the ninth. Czułem się trochę winny, ale wymyśliłem wymówkę, aby uzasadnić mój drogi buy. Here’s what I told Chris when I showed him the dress:

“Our buy nothing New challenge is supposed to help us be more intentional with our spending. Chcę, żebyś wiedziała, że ​​bardzo celowo kupiłam tę sukienkę!" (Tweet this )

I was really proud of myself to say it! It was also the collapse of our experiment. The second half of the year was full of New shopping. We had a lot of trouble buying second hand clothes for girls. One was that we later found holes in unfortunate places, so we gave up on buying used pants. I struggled with sciatica and bought a stabilizer ball and foam roller to help. They were more or less impulsive purchases that I delayed going to the doctor. I now visit a chiropractor and don’t use those Objects.

Buying stuff in the second half of the year was like overeating on a poor diet. We bought a lot in the following months New Objects. We continued to try avoiding buying New, but our resolve wasn’t as strong. Buying used goods takes more time and patience (search thrift stores). We were tired and buying New felt easier at times.

Trying to buy nothing New for a full year was tough. We ended the year with 90 New purchased Objects. This is far above our goal of zero, but the challenge did have an impact on how much New stuff we bought. In 2016 we had purchased 153 New Objects. In 2017 we reduced it by 40%. We also learned a few lessons along the way.

5 lessons from our Buy Nothing New challenge

  1. There will be unexpected necessary purchases (carbon monoxide detectors)
  2. At some point you’ll throw a pathetic party (my $ 80 dress that I still love)
  3. Be diligent when buying second-hand (holes in the pants we didn’t notice before)
  4. Do not use purchases as solutions (stabilizer ball)
  5. When taking on a New challenge, start small (a full year is a long time, a three month challenge would have been a better first step)

Have you ever taken a buy nothing New challenge? How did it go?

How to make positive changes in the group to help them move closer to the vision of the project

Q: I’ve read through your Rules and suggested best practices and my local admin is doing something quite different in our group. How can we bring the group closer to the Buy Nothing Project group as described on your website?

– First, use all the resources available to all members on our website to try to answer your questions or to better understand the rationale behind the global standard rules. We have the following pages to help you:

— If your question or concern hasn’t been answered through the resources on our website, you could post in your group about the particular rule or suggested best practices that you’d like to bring to your group. Invite other group members and leaders to join the discussion on this topic. I principi dello Standard Globale incoraggiano i membri a pubblicare la loro gratitudine, i loro pensieri e le loro preoccupazioni per il loro gruppo e a presentare il pensiero economico. Bringing ideas and suggestions to your group in a post is a great way to get engage everyone in the basic Mission and Principles of a Buy the Nothing group, building an understanding of what a Buy Nothing Project group has the potential to become.

– Send private messages to the local group leadership at the same time, inviting you to speak directly to your suggestions or concerns. We encourage you to use the documents on this website to answer your questions or concerns.

– You can suggest that some of your local members and leaders meet to discuss how to help your group continue to implement the ideals and standards that the Buy Nothing project promotes and suggest ways to creatively change the existing culture in the group. Interpersonal discussions are always much more productive than online forums. Zachęcamy do poczucia własności przez członków misji i zasad „Kupuj nic", które dotyczą wszystkich sąsiadów. I volontari di Buy Nothing stanno lavorando duramente per creare documenti che aiuteranno le persone in tutto il mondo a costruire un’economia delle donazioni per potenziare le proprie comunità.

— If you’ve been in another Buy the Nothing group and your New group feels quite different, post to your New group, sharing your experiences and observations. Describe what you enjoyed and what may not have worked well for you, and offer suggestions on how your group could become an even stronger gift economy. Be the change you want to see and model what you’ve seen happen in other Buy the Nothing groups.

— Offer your support to your local admin(s) if you’d like to help. Maybe you can help as an admin, moderator or membership queue. All Buy the Nothing group leaders are encouraged to take part in our Admin Training as well as our Volunteer Resource Center. Siamo una rete globale di volontari, tutti noi siamo qui per supportare il tuo gruppo locale e i suoi leader.

— If you’ve been waiting in the queue to join the group, to no avail, please contact your local admins, not the Buy Nothing Project. You can also check if you have Facebook friends in your group. If so, you can reach out to these friends and ask them to post to the group, asking why people are queuing up.

— If all of your efforts have proven fruitless, you can reach out to the volunteers on the Buy Nothing Project Development Team to start your own Buy the Nothing group to provide the sort of gift economy you’d like to build for your community.

(last update of this page on 28 August 2020)

"How

Whether for financial reasons or a simpler, more minimalist lifestyle, many people try different ways to consume and buy less. One way to do this is to commit to going a year without purchasing any New Objects. If you are ready to embark on this journey, these tips can help you on your journey!

Get the right attitude

If you are committed to buying nothing New for a year, it’s important to get into the right mindset. Start by weighing your definition of desire versus need and hold on to the consumer’s desire for immediate satisfaction. Focusing on things that are truly a necessity will help as well as applying creative strategies for obtaining those Objects.

Note: The challenge of buying nothing New for a year typically excludes items like food and essential toiletries, though there are ways to reduce your purchases in those areas as well.

Join community groups like Freecycle

Join groups like Freecycle where you can connect with others in your community to get the items you need for free. You can also offer items that you no longer need or want. Freecycle is one of the largest non-profit groups of its kind, where members connect to help reduce waste and facilitate the reuse of still-functional Objects.

Trade in goods or services

Il vecchio metodo di scambio di baratto può tornare utile quando si cerca di evitare di buy. Consider how your existing acquaintances or items you have at home can be exchanged for something else. For example, maybe you’re great at web design and wishing for a New pair of earrings. Ask a crafty friend to pair up for help on her site. Use services like BarterQuest and TradeAway to barter for both small and major Objects.

Go to a clothing swap or change it up

A year can be a long time to go without purchasing clothing, but you don’t actually have to buy New items to update your wardrobe. Avoid the malls and choose to participate or even organize a clothing exchange. You can get large items at the same time and reduce clutter in your closet. You can often also find free clothes from online exchanges or local organizations.

Buy used items

There are so many secondhand stores around today, from traditional and online thrift store or consignment venues to more specialized ones that focus on furniture or kids’ Objects. Buying second-hand items from a second-hand shop or local garage sale can save you money and stay engaged in a cheaper life.

Create your products

Avoid buying New products and instead choose to make your own. You can save on supplies by doing things like your housekeepers, finding hacks for DIY clothing projects, and even making your own gifts.

Repair objects instead of replacing them

If you are committed to buying nothing New for a year, you could run into difficulty if something like an appliance breaks. Learn how to do a repair so that you can do it yourself (or trade goods or services with a friend who knows how to do the repair) and avoid overspending. It also repairs smaller items like clothes and shoes.

Find freebies

There are several legal places, both local and online, to find freebies and product samples to help you stretch your money and buy less. If there is an item you want or need, such as household items, you can also look for products that may be free after a discount.

Enjoy free entertainment

"How

Go to the library instead of buying books. You can check as many titles as you want for free to get the best chance. Depending on your library’s policies, you may also be able to download free movies, TV series, music, and audiobooks for a very low price.

Plus, rediscover the fun of playing the classic board games you already own. They are perfect for a family night out, friends reunions and other gatherings.

Choose reusable items

Instead of buying items that will need to be discarded, consider items that can be reused. Examples include the use of cloth diapers instead of disposable ones, the use of rechargeable batteries, and drinking water from reusable bottles.

Reuse or modify

Think before you throw things away: is there a way to reuse them and make them useful? With a little creativity, you can come up with a lot of things. Create craft projects with things like old T-shirts or plastic spoons, use old five gallon buckets to organize or plants, and even turn an old plaque into a bag! The design options are endless.

Consider the rent

For some things, renting may be a viable option instead of buying. If you have a special event to attend, rent a dress through a service like Rent the Runway. Rent things like large power tools or carpet machines for home projects, instead of spending high costs to purchase them.

Develop your products

While food is essential, you can limit what you buy in grocery stores by planting a garden and growing your own produce and herbs. You’ll also save money by making things like homemade spaghetti sauce and bread.

Live your best life

The pursuit of what is bigger and better has contributed to the emergence of a consumer-oriented society. If you’re looking for a more mindful, minimalist, or frugal way of life, you may find the idea of going a year without purchasing any New items to be very appealing. It is possible to make the lifestyle changes necessary to succeed, and the year you spend getting by without buying New things can be both impactful and meaningful.

(CNN) — As the post-Thanksgiving rush to the stores gets underway in the U. S., Friday has been declared "Buy Nothing Day" in the U. S. and Canada. With Christmas shopping in full swing, 53 more countries will celebrate this occasion on Saturday. Here’s how you can get involved.

Don’t buy anything for a day? Seems easy. Sure, you can just stay home in bed all day, but that wouldn’t really fit the spirit of the occasion. „Dzień bez kupowania", czyli BND, nie polega na powstrzymywaniu się przez 24 godziny tylko po to, by z jeszcze większym entuzjazmem pogrążyć się z powrotem w wir konsumpcjonizmu. Zamiast tego jest to okazja do zastanowienia się nad wpływem, jaki nasza kultura „wydaj-wydaj-wydaj" wywiera na świat i środowisko. Podkreślając fakt, że 20 procent światowej populacji zużywa 80 procent zasobów planety, organizatorzy BND nazywają to wydarzenie „instrumentem" wspierającym ruch na rzecz zrównoważonego rozwoju.

Take control of your life: Okay, let’s say you wake up and your plans for the day are a little more ambitious than lying on the sofa. If you’re going somewhere, you’ll need to think about transportation – even if you’re not planning on refueling today, using a car would go against everything BND stands for. Can you walk or ride a bike instead? I hope you have some food at home – you will need to make your own lunch instead of buying a packaged sandwich. When it comes to entertainment, bars, cinemas and clubs are inaccessible. You can stay home with a book or just spend time with your family. If you live alone and the prospect of an evening without company is too much to bear, invite your friends over. Don’t ask them to bring you a bottle.

Sustainable Development: In the longer term, the BND aims to encourage shoppers to consider the impact of their consumption habits more carefully. Before buying, ask yourself if you really need it and take into account the ecological footprint of the product: where it comes from, how much energy was used to produce it and if it is recyclable or biodegradable. When you need to shop, do it locally so that the money stays in the community. You’re more likely to be welcomed by a local shopkeeper whose maintenance depends on your business rather than a large, profit-margin supermarket.

Do things: BND might be the only reason that doesn’t encourage you to buy a bracelet, but that doesn’t stop you from making your own. And why stop here? Make a BND cake or visit www. consumer monster. com / for instructions on how to make your own BND doll. Plant vegetables in your garden, cook your bread, make your sweater, write your books, build your home. nothing stops you.

Exchange shops: In the days before the long-forgotten caveman, the only way to conduct economic transactions was through the ancient art of bartering. Nowadays, many of the anti-buyers involved are restoring this tradition by opening their own exchange shops where they can exchange tattoos. You can even buy tons of things for free – check out www. slow cycle. org /, the perfect place for unwanted Christmas gifts. Nowadays, the bartering trade is not limited only to material goods, but also extends to services – see www. bartering services. com / – so if you’ve always dreamed of playing the piano with your masseuse’s fingers, all you need is a music teacher with a diseased spine.

What else?Organizatorzy BND proponują szereg wydarzeń zakłócających kulturę, aby rozpowszechniać informacje wśród niekonwertowanych, takich jak utworzenie „strefy wolnej od kupujących" – „Wyznacz przestrzeń publiczną i wypełnij ją ludźmi grającymi w gry, słuchającymi muzyki i relaksującymi na kanapach lub krzesłach (nadmuchiwane meble są dobre). Rozdaj zdezorientowanym widzom balony z napisem BND" – chociaż odradzają robienie tego na terenie prywatnym.

But remember the children. „Twoje działanie nie powinno utrudniać ludziom wykonywania codziennych czynności – blokowanie drzwi lub sztuczki kaskaderskie w stylu osła nie działają – wiele osób nie ma wyboru, jeśli chodzi o uczestnictwo w społeczeństwie konsumenckim" – ostrzegają organizatorzy BND. „Ostatecznie kupujący nie będą słuchać, jeśli traktujesz ich jak wroga".

In 2017, we took up the challenge of buying nothing new for the entire calendar year. We wanted to break away from the consumerism that surrounds us on a daily basis. We hoped that if we didn’t buy anything new during the year, it would help us spend our money more consciously.

We got itfive strategiesto help us avoid purchasing new items:

  1. Wear – do not replace items until they no longer perform their function
  2. Repair: If possible, repair broken / broken components instead of replacing them
  3. Change of Destiny: Do we already have something that can satisfy the use of this item?
  4. Self-sourcing: can we make it ourselves with other materials?
  5. Buy used – can we find what we need instead of a new one?

While these strategies were useful, we knew there would be exceptions. Chris and I thought through it and came up with 4 exceptionswhich we felt in line with our values:

  • Underwear, socks and shoes
  • Photographic prints (school photos and photos for our roadmap)
  • Car maintenance parts (we know we will need new tires next year)
  • Home renovation (we had to finish the ongoing projects)

Our experience

Chris and I were really optimistic when we started on January 1st 2017. We even obeyed the rules! We did buy New carbon monoxide detectors, which weren’t on the exception list. But it was a safety concern for our family and deemed necessary New buy. For the next two months, we stayed focused and never broke our challenge rules. We entered the fourth month thinking this challenge would be easy for our minimalist family.

Then my computer’s power cord finally gave out. We talked about buying used but we have already done it and it didn’t take long. So we broke the challenge for a good cause, buying a brand spanking New mac laptop power cord! It was a justified buy. But that’s the problem right? Once an excuse is found, many more will follow. I bought one of our children a costume as a birthday present. I told myself it was an experience, but let’s be honest – it was an item! And it was so New.

The next month I bought some stainless steel straws. I still love them to this day, but it honestly was an impulse buy. A week later, I found myself at a pity party. All my clothes looked worn and frayed. I felt exhausted and distracted. I had some business to attend to and decided to go to one of my favorite stores. I left with a $ 80 summer dress for the ninth. Czułem się trochę winny, ale wymyśliłem wymówkę, aby uzasadnić mój drogi buy. Here’s what I told Chris when I showed him the dress:

“Our buy nothing New challenge is supposed to help us be more intentional with our spending. Chcę, żebyś wiedziała, że ​​bardzo celowo kupiłam tę sukienkę!" (Tweet this )

I was really proud of myself to say it! It was also the collapse of our experiment. The second half of the year was full of New shopping. We had a lot of trouble buying second hand clothes for girls. One was that we later found holes in unfortunate places, so we gave up on buying used pants. I struggled with sciatica and bought a stabilizer ball and foam roller to help. They were more or less impulsive purchases that I delayed going to the doctor. I now visit a chiropractor and don’t use those Objects.

Buying stuff in the second half of the year was like overeating on a poor diet. We bought a lot in the following months New Objects. We continued to try avoiding buying New, but our resolve wasn’t as strong. Buying used goods takes more time and patience (search thrift stores). We were tired and buying New felt easier at times.

Trying to buy nothing New for a full year was tough. We ended the year with 90 New purchased Objects. This is far above our goal of zero, but the challenge did have an impact on how much New stuff we bought. In 2016 we had purchased 153 New Objects. In 2017 we reduced it by 40%. We also learned a few lessons along the way.

5 lessons from our Buy Nothing New challenge

  1. There will be unexpected necessary purchases (carbon monoxide detectors)
  2. At some point you’ll throw a pathetic party (my $ 80 dress that I still love)
  3. Be diligent when buying second-hand (holes in the pants we didn’t notice before)
  4. Do not use purchases as solutions (stabilizer ball)
  5. When taking on a New challenge, start small (a full year is a long time, a three month challenge would have been a better first step)

Have you ever taken a buy nothing New challenge? How did it go?