How to build a mason jar herb garden

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How to build a mason jar herb garden

Herb garden in a glass jar

Glass jars are an affordable and elegant solution for growing herbs indoors.

Photo: Photo: Mick Telkamp

Photo by Mick Telkamp

All summer long, the vases on my deck are filled with herbs. I used to keep a wide variety because, well, they’re easy to grow and don’t take up much space. Eventually, I realized that growing cilantro doesn’t make much sense, since I can’t stand the stuff, and one variety of mint is probably plenty. Dill, on the other hand, is an important part of summer pickling, I’ll use parsley in just about anything and no matter now much basil I grow, it won’t be enough. Integrated with rosemary, chives and a few other aromatic herbs on the terrace it became a fundamental part of my summer gardening. But what happens when summer turns into autumn? Let’s move the operation into the room.

Growing herbs indoors is an easy choice when using fresh herbs is part of the daily kitchen routine. There has always been some confusion in recent years to find enough small containers to replant the many herbs that grow on the back porch. That wasn’t a problem this year as we embrace the ease, style and convenience of mason jar gardening.

Mason jars are readily available, inexpensive, and have an innate rustic style that will last. Using Mason pots (or other recycled pots) to grow herbs is a hassle-free solution when transplanting herbs or starting from scratch. Follow the steps below to manage drainage, growing medium, sunlight requirements, and add some flair to our favorite houseplants.

Materials

  • Quart glass jars
  • Small stones or gravel
  • Potted mixture
  • Plants or seeds of aromatic herbs
  • Jar labels

Step one: put the stones in the jars

Since the jars don’t have drainage holes, starting with a layer of stones, gravel, or even balls about 2 inches deep at the bottom of the jars, the roots won’t be damaged by excess water.

Step two: add potting soil

Unlike soil, a potting soil is a planting medium that contains lighter organic material such as peat, compost, and sometimes perlite. Potted mixture (not to be confused with potting soil) provides excellent moisture retention and is a good choice for container gardening. Fill the jars with potting soil up to 1-2 inches below the rim of the jar.

Step three: transplant herbs or plant seeds

While Mason Jar Herb Garden is an easy way to replant herbs from outdoor planting boxes for kitchen gardening, glass jars are also an inexpensive and convenient way to plant herbs indoors. Follow the instructions given by your seed supplier for best results, but in most cases plant the seeds on top of potting soil, cover with about an inch of extra potting soil, and water lightly.

When transplanting herbs into Mason pots, gently separate the roots to stimulate growth, plant in the pot and pack well and mix around the roots and base of the plant (pot with the top). For plants with more solid roots, a small amount of potting soil may need to be removed before planting. Keep the roots exposed to the air as short as possible and water the plants as soon as they are replanted.

Step four: label the jars

Herbs can be labeled with a craft stick stuck in mud, an ID card attached to the neck of the jar, or a sticker attached to the jar itself. Most of the time, your glass jar garden will remain in sight, so a nice label goes a long way in adding some style to these functional containers.

Step five: maintenance

Your glass jar garden is incredibly portable. Place the jars in a place that receives at least 6 hours of sunlight per day (windowsill, countertop, etc.), but enjoy the ease with which they are portable. Water the herbs, but don’t overdo it. Collect from the kitchen as needed to add flavor to what’s on the menu.

If you are looking for your herbarium at home without paying a fortune, you are in the right place. You don’t have to pay for special flower pots to set up your little garden with the herbs you want.

These jars are perfect for all environments, even the coldest ones, because all you need is water, sunlight and good soil to let the herbs bloom and therefore always have natural and fresh products. In this tutorial, we will teach you how to create your own herb garden in a glass jar with materials that are perfect for your home.

How to build a mason jar herb garden

Things you will need

Indeed, the materials are very easy to find. Even some won’t be necessary even for you to look for them because surely you already have them:

How to build a mason jar herb garden

  • Glass jars:Any glass jar will do, you can even use pre-cleaned recycled containers like jam jars or pickle jars, for example.
  • Glass jar holder (optional): You don’t need the holder to make the herb garden. This item is simply for a more aesthetic and convenient placement of our jars wherever we place them.
  • Soil:A good soil can be perfectly prepared at home from organic matter or bought in supermarkets or specialized gardening stores.
  • Rock / Pebbles: They should be small enough to fit inside the jar, but large enough that a layer of gravel doesn’t form. Any stone you see on the street of the indicated size can come in handy.
  • Sand: The sand doesn’t need to be of any kind. We just have to make sure it’s clean and doesn’t have any toxic substances that could harm the plant.
  • Plant / Herb Seeds: Although theoretically, any plant would work, it’s more advisable to plant aromatic herbs and spices. Larger plants may run out of space and won’t grow properly.
  • Paper and stick (optional): If we are going to make more than one jar of different herbs and want to distinguish them. We will plant it after we have finished our herb garden and watered it.

Step by step guide

The jars they can have can be of different sizes. Here are some of the measures available for the amount of sand, pebbles or earth that needs to be placed, depending on the size of the container. We carry out measurements for a glass bottle with a capacity of 0.5 liters.

How to build a mason jar herb garden

  1. In a clean glass jar,we put a layer of sand about a finger thick. (dimensions vary depending on the size of the jar)
  2. Put some stone, so that the soil is sufficiently separated from the sand and also leaves spaces between the rocks for drainage. The thickness varies, but it should be slightly thicker than the previously cast layer of sand.
  3. Put the soil. It should be the thickest layer of the three and should take up about half of the glass jar. Add soil until you get to the part where the jar shrinks.
  4. Add the seeds. We need to take some seeds of the plant we want and scatter them in the ground. After doing this, we simply put the soil on top of the jar. In this way the seeds are protected.
  5. Water the soil. Once our mason jar herb garden is finished, it’s necessary to water the soil. It should be watered only when the soil is dry, it is good that thanks to the layer of pebbles and sand, the excess water that we can pour escapes from the ground and goes into the sand, protecting the plant from overflowing. Any water that could get into the sand during evaporation will return to the ground, allowing it to stay wet for longer.
  6. Put the jars in a sunny place.We just have to wait the time it takes for our plant to grow.
  7. Once it’s grown enough, you can use your plant butnever harvest more than a third of the plantbecause otherwise you can damage the rest of the grass.

How to build a mason jar herb garden

As you may have read, it’s not only cheap, it’s also very easy to make, so you have no excuse not to enjoy the freshest herbs without leaving the house.

Posted in Last updated: April 23, 2020 Categories Container gardening, DIY projects

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How to build a mason jar herb garden

How to build a mason jar herb garden

I like the idea of ​​making pots from what we already have on hand. And mason jars are always plentiful here, thanks to a few handmade jar boxes. These special herb pots were created with the local Cub Scout branch. Easy-to-plant herbs were the perfect decorations for their New Year’s Eve banquet, and I was able to teach them how to plant herbs!

How to build a mason jar herb garden

Aromatic herb planters without holes

Though it is possible to drill holes in glass, it’s a difficult process that I usually don’t have time for. So how do you create a good environment for a plant without drainage holes? Use the stones.

I like to put stones on the bottom of the containers without holes as they help the soil not to settle on the bottom of the container. Rocks also give extra water a place to sit until it’s soaked up by the soil, kind of like a miniature self-watering planter. (Create a self-watering pot here for a fabulous salad garden!)

And while the rocks do add a bit of weight to the planter, this can be a good thing if you’re using these planters outside and a good gust of wind comes up. The stones help to weigh down the pot, avoiding broken glass.

What size glass jars per jar

For this particular project I chose the one liter jars as the basil plants we selected were already of a good size. If you’re using smaller plants, then you could get by with a pint jar. Personally, I also like wide-mouthed jars because they give you more room to maneuver the plant into the jar.

How to build a mason jar herb garden

Materials eksploatacyjne do sadzarki do ziół Mason Jar

  • 1 liter glass jar (preferably wide mouth)
  • Potted soil
  • Rocks
  • Grass of your choice
  • Optional: a smoothie straw

How to make a herb planter with a bricklayer?

  1. Start by gathering the materials and gently place the stones on the bottom of the mason jar. Use enough stones to form a 1-2 inch layer on the bottom. (Optional: Place a milkshake straw next to the rocks and take it out of the jar. This straw can be used as a way to water the plant with a funnel.)

How to build a mason jar herb garden

2. Fill the jar halfway with potting soil (it can make a mess!) And shake it gently to stabilize the soil.

How to build a mason jar herb garden

3. Remove the grass from its original container and loosen the roots. Gently place the plant in the jar, adding more potting soil if the plant appears to be too low in the jar. (We use basil in our jar and did you know that if you cut it, it will grow like crazy!)

How to build a mason jar herb garden

4. Use extra potting compost to fill in any gaps not filled by the plant. Gently pat the soil around the plant to be sure it’s in the jar securely. Water the plant to ensure it’s properly hydrated.

5. Place the jar in a sunny spot indoors or out, or decorate it with a ribbon or label for a fun gift or centerpiece!

Fun variety of herb planters

  • Have the children paint the outside of the mason jar before or after planting it as a wonderful Mother’s Day gift or birthday present.
  • Tie a pendant around the top of the plant with the recipe that includes the herb in the jar.
  • Replace the herb with any small plant, even succulent!
  • Create a small herb garden like ours!

How to build a mason jar herb garden

Make this fun and easy potted herb pot in glass jars with few materials!

Herbs are one of those things that I love to buy in the supermarket but I never use them. At least not before they turn brown and moldy. Either I only use a tiny bit at a time, or I forget about them until it’s way too late. So I decided long ago it’s best if I just grow my own.

Freshly grown herbs are not only a healthy addition to home-cooked meals, they also serve as decorations when stored in jars and placed on window sills or on sunny shelves. Any type of pot will work when it comes to herb gardening, but glass jars are easy to find and easy to see. And if you really can to seewhen the earth dries out, you don’t have to worry about brown thumb getting the best of you.

How to build a mason jar herb garden

How to Make a Herb garden in a glass jar

You don’t need lots of yard space or a south-facing patio in order to successfully grow herbs–those babies were practically made for a sunny windowsill. Just collect some old glass jars and a bag of potting soil.

Since mason jars don’t have great drainage, I also recommend picking up some small stones to give your plants some lift. And lastly, pick out your herbs (either to seeds or pre-started to seedlings will do). Things like basil, thyme, and mint are easy to care for and will definitely be used a lot, but any herb will work.

How to build a mason jar herb garden

The key to a herb garden in a jar is to avoid overwatering (the stones will help with this) and to cool the soil roughly every year. And as your plants grow out of jars, transplant them into larger jars or even smaller pots to keep them happy and green.

Supplies

  • 32 oz glass jars
  • Small stones (I got mine from a dollar store)
  • Herbs (either to seeds or pre-grown to seedlings)
  • Potted soil
  • Activated carbon
  • Ice cream sticks to mark plants

Instructions

1. Place a 1-inch layer of stones on the bottom of the glass jar.

How to build a mason jar herb garden

2. Add a thin layer of activated charcoal over the stones.

3. If planting to seedlings, fill part way with potting mix. Then add your to seedling and fill in around it with more soil.

If planting to seeds, fill to 1/2-inch below the edge of the jar. Place 3 to 4 to seeds in the center and press into the soil slightly. Cover with shallow dirt powder. Water to keep the soil moist but not wet.

How to build a mason jar herb garden

4. Place the jar (s) in the sunniest window and water only when the soil 2 inches below the surface is dry to the touch.

5. If growing from to seed, once your to seedlings are 1-2 inches tall, pluck the thinnest, weakest looking plants so only the strongest one remains. If starting with to seedlings, trim your plants every so often so they grow short and full, not tall and sparse.

How to build a mason jar herb garden

You’ve probably heard it before: “If you’re going to grow one thing, grow herbs.” You’ll be rewarded with unparalleled freshness and flavor, changing meals into moments, and you can live guilt free, no more mystery bags of wilted, unused bunches of something in the crisper — instead gather what you want when you need it.

Więc jakie zioła uprawiać, gdzie je uprawiać i w czym je uprawiać? First ask yourself which plants do you reach the most: parsley, chives, basil, mint…? This will help you identify where and how to plant.

How to build a mason jar herb garden

Most herbs can be grown in containers indoors, and many delicate non-woody varieties such as coriander, parsley, basil, and marjoram can grow in smaller pots, even glass jars. Making a garden with jars is perfect for a windowsill, it’s clean and looks great. (I’m fully in on the canning jar craze.)

The problem with canning jars is that there is NO drainage. In addition to adding holes, which is not recommended, there are several ways to solve this problem, which I describe below. However, as a full disclaimer, I’m still experimenting with this process and, at the moment, expect many of plants I grow in jars to be shorter lived than those growing in larger containers with adequate drainage and aeration. That said, I’m happy to treat the herbs I grow more like greens, planting little and often for successional crops or cut-and-come-again returns.

How to build a mason jar herb garden

Create your own canned herb garden

What you will need:

    • A quart jar is preferable.
    • Organic soil. Potted soil is designed to hold moisture while not being water logged. Look for a peat-free blend.
    • Clean the draining stone, pebbles, stones or glass beads.
    • Mother of pearl. Perlite is a common soil and gardening additive that you can find at your local nursery or hardware store. It’s great for wicking water and it’s what makes this a modified hydroponic system.
    • Seeds or to seedlings. Start with a few and go from there.
    • Activated carbon, *optional. Charcoal absorbs moisture as well as bacteria and fungi, helping to reduce the growth of mold and other undesirable substances without drainage and without aeration. Find charcoal at a pet store, daycare or here: Starwest Botanicals Charcoal Powder (Activated), 4 oz.
  1. Arrange a layer of 1/2 inch to 1 inch thick stones along the bottom of the jars. Rocks będą działać jako interfejs między słojem a warstwami perlitu i gleby. When watering, you should be able to to see the water line at this layer. When you to see water to the top of the rock layer, you know you don’t need to water — the water will wick up through the perlite to the soil. After it dries, there is no more water to dry and the only water left for your plant is that of the soil. * See below for further irrigation instructions.
  2. Above the drainage, apply a layer of perlite 1/2 inch to 1 inch thick.
  3. If you’re going to add charcoal, add it now. A thin layer is enough.
  4. If planting to seedlings, fill part way with potting soil. Add your to seedling and then fill in around it, gently pressing the soil at the base of the plant to be sure it’s making good contact with the soil.
  5. If planting to seeds, fill your jar nearly to the top with soil. Place 3 to 4 to seeds toward the center of the planting area and give each to seed about a 1/2 inch planting distance (don’t pile them up). Cover with soil, generally 1/8 to 1/4 inch for most herb to seeds but check your to seed packet to be sure. Water to keep the soil moist but not wet. Once your to seeds have germinated, thin the weaker, smaller starts by trimming with scissors and leave just one to grow. (Don’t forget to eat your thinnings!)
  6. Place jar(s) in your sunniest window and water only when one or both of the following things happen: If, one, you reach down into the soil and inch with your finger and it’s dry and/or, two, the drain rock is dry, the water having wicked up into the soil. The frequency of watering will depend on the plants you’re growing as well as your home environment: how sunny and hot the growing location, if you heat with forced air or otherwise, if it’s drafty, etc. And remember, some plants like thyme and oregano prefer drier soil while others may require more moisture.

The beauty of growing plants indoors is they’re under constant watch. This is a great opportunity to learn about the unique characteristics of each of them and how they grow. Some may thrive better than others and, while it’s no fun to have a plant die under your care, this too is good information. The more you develop, the better you can handle it.

I will notify you of changes or modifications as soon as I am aware of them.

In the meantime, good luck and have fun! Emilia

How to build a mason jar herb garden

As summer turns into autumn, many people are wondering how to extend the season. Mason Jar Herb Gardens are popular designs.

The story of the mason jar

Mason Jar is a brand of home storage glass containers invented by John Landis Mason in 1858. After the patent expired, many other glass companies jumped into fashion and started producing their own counterfeit products. However, the name of the glass jar is blocked, regardless of the name imprinted on the containers. All jars have molded screw rings that use metal lids to seal the contents. The jars are strong, durable and even attractive, so they have proven themselves well in everyday life. Even those families who would never consider storing products probably have a few sessions.

Mason jar gardens are lovely and popular

Pretty little herb gardens planted in Mason jars to seem to be popping up on craft and idea sites all over the internet. And they do look lovely all lined up in a sunny window, however there is more to it than popping a few to seeds in a dirt-filled jar. Most of these photos were taken before fate and darkness finally arrive. Understanding what a plant needs and how to regulate water is critical to your success. Proper care and feeding in a container without a drain hole is different from a regular container with drainage. Herbs that do well in these gardens include basil, coriander, chives, parsley, thyme, and mint.

Herb gardens in glass jar with potting mix

You can have a garden in a glass jar in two ways. The first concerns the well-known root soil. The only problem is that the soil will soon be acidic and moldy if there is more moisture than the plant needs. Fill the jar with a few inches of fine gravel before adding the potting mix. If you are using transplants, leave a few inches of space for the transplant. Gently place the graft into the jar and finish filling the container. Water in moderation, but make sure the soil doesn’t dry out. The water shouldn’t stay in the gravel layer for more than a day, so frequent, sparse watering is better than occasional copious watering. The soil should not be soggy, otherwise the roots will rot and mosquitoes will appear. Using an organic and sterile potting mix should help, but too much moisture will still be problematic. Lightly sprinkling the soil with ground cinnamon every week will help prevent fungus growth. Cinnamon contains cinnamaldehyde which is a natural fungicide and is safe to use near edible plants and smells good too. Place your Mason Jar garden in a sunny window or light it with a fluorescent or LED light for at least eight hours a day. Many people simply mount a light bar under the cabinets to keep the vegetable garden close to the cooking area. Fertilize with universal granulated fertilizer or fish emulsion, dissolved in water and diluted to ¼ strength every two weeks. Frequently pinch and cut herbs to encourage branching. After all, the purpose of an indoor herb garden is to use it.

How to build a mason jar herb garden

Grow a hydroponic garden in a glass jar

The second way to grow a vegetable garden in a glass jar is through hydroponic cultivation. This method is not as expensive or difficult as many believe. With a little preparation and the right plants, this garden can be very successful. Preparing the glass jars is the first thing you need to do. The jars need to be painted or sealed with something light-proof to prevent algae from forming in the water. Sunlight on the water will turn it green in no time. Many people paint their jars with chalk paint and use the blank for a nice label. Some people place a small sticker on the jar before painting at the correct level that they can remove to to see if water should be added. Others put their jars in decorated cartons or fabric sleeves. You’ll need something called a net, or you can make your own by cutting narrow slits around the cheese or yogurt container. Plastic cups with little holes all over the place are fine too. The container only needs to fit around the neck of the glass jar so that the rim of the container is held in place while the metal ring is screwed onto the neck. Trim or cut the tabs to fit. You will also need rock wool cubes or Jiffy to seed starting pellets if you are growing from to seed and either perlite or hydroton pellets to hold the plants stable in the pot. It is also recommended that you purchase liquid hydroponic nutrients to add to the water. Either plant your to seeds in the growing medium, or carefully wash the soil from the roots of your transplants. Place both in the pot and carefully fill with perlite or hydrotron pebbles. Carefully fill the jar with filtered water so that the bottom of the container is about ¼ to ½ inch into the liquid. This is where you need to have a method to monitor the water level. Place it in a sunny spot or under lights and add water to store when needed.

Extend the season with Mason jar gardens

Ogrody ziołowe w słoikach Mason to atrakcyjny sposób na przedłużenie sezonu, a w przepisie nie ma nic lepszego niż świeże zioła. They need special care to be successful, but it’s not that hard once you find out what they need. Herb garden in a glass jar is a great way to add life and flavor to your kitchen and brighten those long winter days.

About Melody Rose

How to build a mason jar herb garden

About Melody Rose

I come from a long line of Kentucky people who love the Good Earth. I enjoy learning about every living thing and sharing what I have learned. Photography is one of my passions and all the photos in my articles are mine, except where they are published.

How to build a mason jar herb garden

How would you like to have a constant supply of fresh herbs from your grow on hand? All you have to do is remake your jars and throw them on a pallet, some wood, or even a shutter.

Our post contains many great ideas that you will love and we also show you how to stack your own herb jars. We’ve also included a video and the 10 best herbs for indoor growing.

How to build a mason jar herb garden

by Fix

How To Make A Herb garden in a glass jar

It’s easy to put these Mason jars together. It is recommended to use high quality organic potting soil for this project.

DIY Herb garden in a glass jar Materials

  • Mason jars
  • Clamps
  • Potted soil
  • Pebbles for drainage
  • Herbs or plants
  1. Fill your Jars 3/4 full with Potted soil
  2. Add to seeds to each jar following the planting instructions
  3. cover the to seeds with additional potting soil.
  4. Add identification tags to each glass jar
  5. water in to seeds, just enough water to dampen

How to build a mason jar herb garden

The best herbs to grow indoors

Here’s a great infographic from ‘Desima’ outlining the 10 easiest herbs to grow indoors. To be more successful, you really need to properly consider what you are planting.

These herbs also require bright light, good ventilation, and a temperature of around 55-75F (13-24 degrees Fahrenheit) for the best opportunities.

from cheap fun

We have included a short Thrifty Fun video tutorial above that provides information on how to attach jars to wood.

Whilst this DIY is for Mason jars, you could use any wide-mouthed Jar for this project. You can buy Mason jars in bulk on Amazon. Click Play Above ^

How to build a mason jar herb garden

vincl. Rebecca’s bird gardens

You can use a different palette or background. It could be wood, a chalkboard, an old door … everything is fine. We have to seen them hanging on window shutters and lots of other household items.

The best way to work out if the backdrop will be right for your project is to check how easy it will be to attach the Mason jars. The clamps can be used for hanging as shown in the version above

How to build a mason jar herb garden

Here’s an example of a Recycled Shutter that has a lovely distressed look. It is a great inspiration.

We love how you can display your Mason jars on all sorts of materials. We found this idea on Etsy.

How to build a mason jar herb garden

Mason jars also look delightful with flowers, this simple look will brighten up any room. Put a decent space between the rows for an added effect. Found on ‘Put It In A Jar’

How to build a mason jar herb garden

A Pallet is a great backdrop for your Herb garden in a glass jar if you can find one, stain it up for a rustic look like this one from ‘Rebecca’s Bird Garden‘

How to build a mason jar herb garden

How to build a mason jar herb garden

Non ti piace questa versione di "Crafts Unleashed" e Wire Basket è un tocco dolce!

How to build a mason jar herb garden

This Mason Jar Wall Garden from ‘Not Just a Housewife’ looks great. It’s super simple and she has used plants not herbs. She also has some good tips that are sure to come in handy.

  1. Use slow growing plants
  2. No direct light, otherwise you can cook the ball with the roots when the jar has heated up
  3. Not on the water, just wet it
  4. Use drainage stones
  5. Do not hang near the radiator vent

How to build a mason jar herb gardenGli "Stili Camille" hanno reso questi splendidi vasi Mason e le etichette sulla lavagna un tocco adorabile.

How to build a mason jar herb garden

Get chalkboard tape. It’s perfect for your Jars and so easy too! Get yours here

How to build a mason jar herb garden

As summer turns into autumn, many people are wondering how to extend the season. Mason Jar Herb Gardens are popular designs.

The story of the mason jar

Mason Jar is a brand of home storage glass containers invented by John Landis Mason in 1858. After the patent expired, many other glass companies jumped into fashion and started producing their own counterfeit products. However, the name of the glass jar is blocked, regardless of the name imprinted on the containers. All jars have molded screw rings that use metal lids to seal the contents. The jars are strong, durable and even attractive, so they have proven themselves well in everyday life. Even those families who would never consider storing products probably have a few sessions.

Mason jar gardens are lovely and popular

Pretty little herb gardens planted in Mason jars to seem to be popping up on craft and idea sites all over the internet. And they do look lovely all lined up in a sunny window, however there is more to it than popping a few to seeds in a dirt-filled jar. Most of these photos were taken before fate and darkness finally arrive. Understanding what a plant needs and how to regulate water is critical to your success. Proper care and feeding in a container without a drain hole is different from a regular container with drainage. Herbs that do well in these gardens include basil, coriander, chives, parsley, thyme, and mint.

Herb gardens in glass jar with potting mix

You can have a garden in a glass jar in two ways. The first concerns the well-known root soil. The only problem is that the soil will soon be acidic and moldy if there is more moisture than the plant needs. Fill the jar with a few inches of fine gravel before adding the potting mix. If you are using transplants, leave a few inches of space for the transplant. Gently place the graft into the jar and finish filling the container. Water in moderation, but make sure the soil doesn’t dry out. The water shouldn’t stay in the gravel layer for more than a day, so frequent, sparse watering is better than occasional copious watering. The soil should not be soggy, otherwise the roots will rot and mosquitoes will appear. Using an organic and sterile potting mix should help, but too much moisture will still be problematic. Lightly sprinkling the soil with ground cinnamon every week will help prevent fungus growth. Cinnamon contains cinnamaldehyde which is a natural fungicide and is safe to use near edible plants and smells good too. Place your Mason Jar garden in a sunny window or light it with a fluorescent or LED light for at least eight hours a day. Many people simply mount a light bar under the cabinets to keep the vegetable garden close to the cooking area. Fertilize with universal granulated fertilizer or fish emulsion, dissolved in water and diluted to ¼ strength every two weeks. Frequently pinch and cut herbs to encourage branching. After all, the purpose of an indoor herb garden is to use it.

How to build a mason jar herb garden

Grow a hydroponic garden in a glass jar

The second way to grow a vegetable garden in a glass jar is through hydroponic cultivation. This method is not as expensive or difficult as many believe. With a little preparation and the right plants, this garden can be very successful. Preparing the glass jars is the first thing you need to do. The jars need to be painted or sealed with something light-proof to prevent algae from forming in the water. Sunlight on the water will turn it green in no time. Many people paint their jars with chalk paint and use the blank for a nice label. Some people place a small sticker on the jar before painting at the correct level that they can remove to to see if water should be added. Others put their jars in decorated cartons or fabric sleeves. You’ll need something called a net, or you can make your own by cutting narrow slits around the cheese or yogurt container. Plastic cups with little holes all over the place are fine too. The container only needs to fit around the neck of the glass jar so that the rim of the container is held in place while the metal ring is screwed onto the neck. Trim or cut the tabs to fit. You will also need rock wool cubes or Jiffy to seed starting pellets if you are growing from to seed and either perlite or hydroton pellets to hold the plants stable in the pot. It is also recommended that you purchase liquid hydroponic nutrients to add to the water. Either plant your to seeds in the growing medium, or carefully wash the soil from the roots of your transplants. Place both in the pot and carefully fill with perlite or hydrotron pebbles. Carefully fill the jar with filtered water so that the bottom of the container is about ¼ to ½ inch into the liquid. This is where you need to have a method to monitor the water level. Place it in a sunny spot or under lights and add water to store when needed.

Extend the season with Mason jar gardens

Ogrody ziołowe w słoikach Mason to atrakcyjny sposób na przedłużenie sezonu, a w przepisie nie ma nic lepszego niż świeże zioła. They need special care to be successful, but it’s not that hard once you find out what they need. Herb garden in a glass jar is a great way to add life and flavor to your kitchen and brighten those long winter days.

About Melody Rose

How to build a mason jar herb garden

About Melody Rose

I come from a long line of Kentucky people who love the Good Earth. I enjoy learning about every living thing and sharing what I have learned. Photography is one of my passions and all the photos in my articles are mine, except where they are published.