How to bend laminate

Original poster

We were about to wallpaper the stairs and the landing and we saw an idea that we really liked: on every step of the laminate flooring. The hallway and the whole floor downstairs are laminated so it fits well. The only problem is that the bottom step has a curvature at one end with a radius of s and maybe 8 “.

I tried to bend the spare part by making grooves in the back and heating it with a heat gun, but I got close and it broke along one of the grooves. I don’t know if I need more heat (it was so hot I couldn’t touch it) or if I’m just barking at the wrong tree.

Has anyone done it? It is also possible? Some advice?

You probably need more cuts and deeper cuts. But yes, it is doable.

Original poster

mmm, the grooves I cut in my test piece didn’t come close to the edge. I think I have a 3mm more laminate. The guy in the video was barely left with a mosquito. I only have a miter saw to play with, not a table saw. The limiter on my miter saw is not perfect and a little too much pressure would cut the surface. I have a circular saw I wonder if I could use it and I have a router but I’ve never done anything smart with it. If I get the chance tomorrow, maybe I’ll try again.

I just want to try and do something a little different to make it a little more interesting. But most of the ideas I had are complicated by a curved bottom step. Another idea I had was to use thin colored acrylic and make some risers, but I still had to fold it around the bottom step.

Request
Pracuję z dealerem, który wydaje się mieć co najmniej jeden promień 1 1/2" w każdym sprzedawanym blacie laminowanym. Używam opalarki, aby zginać je z różnym powodzeniem. Niektóre marki zginają się dobrze, ale niektóre chcą oderwać od kleju kontaktowego. Zazwyczaj używam kleju PVA zaciśniętego na noc w przypadku tych problematycznych narożników, gdy mój standardowy klej kontaktowy ich nie utrzyma. Czy istnieją wytyczne dotyczące tego, jak długo lub jak długo podgrzewać laminatooo, aby uzyskać najlepsze wyniki? Ponadto, czy powinienem zalecać robienie większych niż 1 1/2 "jeśli to możliwe?

Forum replies
(Laminate and Solid Surface Forum)
Using the postformed grade and heat gun should work fine. It doesn’t absorb much heat.
Since you are making several such radii, you can also cut a block at that radius such as a clamp.

When I need to get into a small radius, I usually try to sand the laminate to the thickness it will pass through. This and the heat usually passes smoothly

I use a product called Tempilstik pastel or Tempilaq paint. Put a little line on the strip of laminatoooo and when the laminatoooo reaches 325 degrees
(bending temperature), the product changes color. I use it during the postforming of the laminateooo. It’s a meowing cat!

Thank you. Does it work well enough with the usual horizontal slope?

Yes, but the horizontal laminate will not create as tight a radius as the vertical layer.

I use an old steam iron. First, apply the border on the longest edge. Keep the heel iron on the diaphragm just before starting the turn. Hold the strip on the edge and wait for the p-lama to soften – this is something you learn to see. Then slowly press the edge against the corner, squeezing the free edge. Firmly pull the free edge and glue it. From time to time you will need to put a handlebar clamp on one of the corners until it cools down. Each brand of p-lam reacts differently, so check for scraps first. What goes well with one will cause the other to burst and blister.

I studied at Art Betterly about 20+ years ago and I can bend to the std. gradation over a 1 “radius. The way to fold a 1 1/2” is to apply wax (carnauba) to the edge, then file the top and bottom of the circle at a 45 degree angle (to avoid cracking) and apply the heat with a heat gun. Keep the gun moving as the edge softens to the desired radius, holding it firmly at the top with a roller or locking rod. Wax is important as it helps keep you warm.

Are you familiar with the following related areas of the Knowledge Base?

  • Knowledge base: Knowledge base
  • Knowledge base: Laminates and solid surfaces
  • KnowledgeBase: Laminates & Solid Surfacing: Fabrication Techniques

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    Questions entered in the comment form for a Knowledge Base article will not generate an answer! A list of the WOODWEB forums can be found in the WOODWEB sitemap.

    When posting your question on the forum, be sure to include a reference to the knowledge base article that inspired your question. The more information you provide in your question, the better your chances of getting an answer.

    Letters, questions or comments? Email us and let us know what you think. Be sure to check out our FAQ page.

    Contact us to discuss announcements or report issues with this site.

    WOODWEB editors, writers and staff strive to promote safe practices. What is safe for a carpenter under certain conditions may not be safe for others under other circumstances. Readers should undertake to use the materials and methods discussed in WOODWEB after such evaluation and at their own risk.

    WOODWEB, Inc.
    Via Bedella, 335
    Montrose, PA 18801

    Request
    When I leave a 2 1/2 inch radius on the outside corner of a countertop using contact concrete, I often notice that the laminate doesn’t stick in straight spots. Some people like to fill these areas with Bondo or squeeze out some super glue to get the glue done. Why does this occur and what are the solutions? I am thinking of gluing only the areas of the radius in white.

    Forum replies
    (Laminate and Solid Surface Forum)
    From collaborator J:
    The beam is not cut at a 90 degree angle. This causes the edge to move up or down. When you force it to go straight around the corner, it makes gaps appear. If you cut the corner with a router and a template, these gaps will disappear.

    From collaborator K:
    I have been laminating 1 “beams on 1-1 / 2” countertops for years without using any adhesive other than normal spray concrete. The laminate is for general use and is full thickness formed (the bottom has not been sanded to a thinner size). For this to work, the laminate must be heated to a relaxed state that allows the material to form in the core. It is not something that can be cooled down. Additionally, there are several brands of laminate that will be more likely to break due to the physical properties of the sheets. In these situations, I usually increase the radius to two inches and increase the protrusion at the front edge or end of the core to make sure the top covers the cabinet and door. It is important to ensure that the core, as mentioned in the previous post, is cut at real radii rather than roughly cut with a jigsaw and / or formed by a belt sander. After cutting the radius, use a block to smooth the transition where the radius meets the straight edge to remove any small imperfections. If the area appears rough, it will increase the chance of the laminate cracking as it forms around the core. Make sure the beam is smooth, remove excess dust and coat properly with glue.

    It is best to find out how the laminate reacts to heat. Buy a commercial heat gun for around $ 100 to $ 125 (we’ve been using Bosch for years, but there are other good brands on the market) and cut some of the laminate hoops to the width you normally use. We cut the width to 1/8 “of the actual thickness of the core. Then we use a heat gun, good gloves while the laminate warms up and safety glasses, we start by heating the strips one by one and observing the movement of the laminate as it heats up 325 degrees Fahrenheit Some stores use a heat-sensitive material that is brushed on the edge to indicate the correct temperature, however, as you learn this procedure you will learn to look for the properties the laminate will show when it “relaxes” and loses its manufacturing memory. relaxation of the material when the perimeter tape is applied vertically and heated.

    Once the material is at the right temperature, it is necessary to work quickly to form the laminate to the edge of the core before it cools. So the gloves really help because the piece is hot. After forming the corner, work together with the rest of the edges, keeping the laminate firmly against the core. This usually eliminates the need to pinch the corner when cooling. Don’t hesitate to heat gun on the periphery for too long on the specimens and make sure they are coated with glue to duplicate the actual results when laminating the core. Find out how long it takes to boil a piece of laminate or from too much heat, then limit the heating time of the material from the result. The actual process, when done correctly, takes much less time than typing this answer.

    When you learn to do this correctly, it can make a big difference in how you can sell countertops to customers by making the outside corners of each countertop safer in busy areas of your home by eliminating the tight curves someone is walking on. after. It also reduces dents in your children’s heads as they grow up. A final benefit is that it removes the dark line and the area where the laminate can snag and break. We’ve all seen a cracked corner of a countertop in a kitchen, shop or office as the countertop has been laminated using the standard square edge machining process.

    Are you familiar with the following related areas of the Knowledge Base?

  • Knowledge base: Knowledge base
  • Knowledge base: Laminates and solid surfaces
  • KnowledgeBase: Laminates & Solid Surfacing: Fabrication Techniques

    Do you want to add information to this article? . Click here

    If you have a question about an article in the Knowledge Base, your best bet is to search for related articles in the entire Knowledge Base or post your question to the appropriate WOODWEB forum. Before posting your post, please review our Forum Guidelines.

    Questions entered in the comment form for a Knowledge Base article will not generate an answer! A list of the WOODWEB forums can be found in the WOODWEB sitemap.

    When posting your question on the forum, be sure to include a reference to the knowledge base article that inspired your question. The more information you provide in your question, the better your chances of getting an answer.

    Letters, questions or comments? Email us and let us know what you think. Be sure to check out our FAQ page.

    Contact us to discuss announcements or report issues with this site.

    WOODWEB editors, writers and staff strive to promote safe practices. What is safe for a carpenter under certain conditions may not be safe for others under other circumstances. Readers should undertake to use the materials and methods discussed in WOODWEB after such evaluation and at their own risk.

    WOODWEB, Inc.
    Via Bedella, 335
    Montrose, PA 18801

    How to bend laminatooo

    Bending wood doesn’t require superhuman strength. There are some common recipes and procedures that can be used to create curved parts from straight boards. In this article we’ll go throughthispros and cons of steam bending, a process of heating and moisturizing wood until it is flexible, laminatoooion, thisprocess of gluing multiple thin, flexible boards together over a curved form, and sawing, cutting curves directly out of flat stock.

    The basics:
    • Steam: High temperature and humidity will cause the board to mature for folding.
    • Lamination: Attaching a stack of thin strips to a mold is an alternative method for creating curved parts.
    • Saw: Cutting a curve directly from a flat square material is always available, but not always the best.

    Steam it

    Steaming uses steam or boiling water to keep the wood pliable so that it can be folded into a pot. After cooling, the folded element will retain its shape. There are advantages to this method: It retainsthiscontinuous long-grain pattern, there are no glue lines, and it doesn’t waste material. Steaming does have some drawbacks: It’s difficult to contain springback, which meansthisform may lose some of its shape, and pieces Pothisza break if there are any defects or issues withthisorientation ofthisgrain. You can reduce cracking by using straight grain lumber without mounting grain. Grain runout refers to areas of the board where grain ends along the edge. The wood bends when steamed at a temperature of around 200 ° F. The time that must evaporate depends on the thickness of the piece; it can be from 20 minutes to 1/4 inch. chair back up to an hour by 2 inches. big chair pole. Steam boxes are relatively easy to make thanks to supplies available from the hardware store; are also commercially available.

    Laminate it

    Another method of bending wood is to saw off a few thin pieces of wood and laminate them in a later stage. Whenthisglue dries, you’re left with a single piece that holdsthisshape ofthisform. Preparing thin pieces for lamination involves cutting the piece in a table or band saw. The downside is that a lot of material is lost on the saw blade cut. Springback is not a major issue when performing folded lamination, especially if using a rigid polyurethane or resin-based adhesive. These adhesives not only modify their shape, but also prevent the layers of laminate from sliding and losing their shape over time, a process known as creep.

    I saw it

    You can always cut out a curved shape from a square, but what you gain in simplicity, you lose strength and durability. Both steam bending and lamination have the advantage of manipulating the wood so that the grain follows the curve and is continuous all over the part. This is especially important for structural elements such as chair legs and backs, where the curved element will support weight and absorb stress. On a sawn part, some parts of the curve may become weak as the grain runs through the part instead of flowing with it.

    Need help deciding which method to use? Check out Brian Bogg’s article about creating curved furniture.

    Sign up today to receive the newsletter and receive the latest techniques and instructions from Fine Woodworking and special offers.

    Original poster

    We were about to wallpaper the stairs and the landing and we saw an idea that we really liked: on every step of the laminate flooring. The hallway and the whole floor downstairs are laminated so it fits well. The only problem is that the bottom step has a curvature at one end with a radius of s and maybe 8 “.

    I tried to bend the spare part by making grooves in the back and heating it with a heat gun, but I got close and it broke along one of the grooves. I don’t know if I need more heat (it was so hot I couldn’t touch it) or if I’m just barking at the wrong tree.

    Has anyone done it? It is also possible? Some advice?

    You probably need more cuts and deeper cuts. But yes, it is doable.

    Original poster

    mmm, the grooves I cut in my test piece didn’t come close to the edge. I think I have a 3mm more laminate. The guy in the video was barely left with a mosquito. I only have a miter saw to play with, not a table saw. The limiter on my miter saw is not perfect and a little too much pressure would cut the surface. I have a circular saw I wonder if I could use it and I have a router but I’ve never done anything smart with it. If I get the chance tomorrow, maybe I’ll try again.

    I just want to try and do something a little different to make it a little more interesting. But most of the ideas I had are complicated by a curved bottom step. Another idea I had was to use thin colored acrylic and make some risers, but I still had to fold it around the bottom step.

    Request
    Pracuję z dealerem, który wydaje się mieć co najmniej jeden promień 1 1/2" w każdym sprzedawanym blacie laminowanym. Używam opalarki, aby zginać je z różnym powodzeniem. Niektóre marki zginają się dobrze, ale niektóre chcą oderwać od kleju kontaktowego. Zazwyczaj używam kleju PVA zaciśniętego na noc w przypadku tych problematycznych narożników, gdy mój standardowy klej kontaktowy ich nie utrzyma. Czy istnieją wytyczne dotyczące tego, jak długo lub jak długo podgrzewać laminatooo, aby uzyskać najlepsze wyniki? Ponadto, czy powinienem zalecać robienie większych niż 1 1/2 "jeśli to możliwe?

    Forum replies
    (Laminate and Solid Surface Forum)
    Using the postformed grade and heat gun should work fine. It doesn’t absorb much heat.
    Since you are making several such radii, you can also cut a block at that radius such as a clamp.

    When I need to get into a small radius, I usually try to sand the laminate to the thickness it will pass through. This and the heat usually passes smoothly

    I use a product called Tempilstik pastel or Tempilaq paint. Put a little line on the strip of laminatoooo and when the laminatoooo reaches 325 degrees
    (bending temperature), the product changes color. I use it during the postforming of the laminateooo. It’s a meowing cat!

    Thank you. Does it work well enough with the usual horizontal slope?

    Yes, but the horizontal laminate will not create as tight a radius as the vertical layer.

    I use an old steam iron. First, apply the border on the longest edge. Keep the heel iron on the diaphragm just before starting the turn. Hold the strip on the edge and wait for the p-lama to soften – this is something you learn to see. Then slowly press the edge against the corner, squeezing the free edge. Firmly pull the free edge and glue it. From time to time you will need to put a handlebar clamp on one of the corners until it cools down. Each brand of p-lam reacts differently, so check for scraps first. What goes well with one will cause the other to burst and blister.

    I studied at Art Betterly about 20+ years ago and I can bend to the std. gradation over a 1 “radius. The way to fold a 1 1/2” is to apply wax (carnauba) to the edge, then file the top and bottom of the circle at a 45 degree angle (to avoid cracking) and apply the heat with a heat gun. Keep the gun moving as the edge softens to the desired radius, holding it firmly at the top with a roller or locking rod. Wax is important as it helps keep you warm.

    Are you familiar with the following related areas of the Knowledge Base?

  • Knowledge base: Knowledge base
  • Knowledge base: Laminates and solid surfaces
  • KnowledgeBase: Laminates & Solid Surfacing: Fabrication Techniques

    Do you want to add information to this article? . Click here

    If you have a question about an article in the Knowledge Base, your best bet is to search for related articles in the entire Knowledge Base or post your question to the appropriate WOODWEB forum. Before posting your post, please review our Forum Guidelines.

    Questions entered in the comment form for a Knowledge Base article will not generate an answer! A list of the WOODWEB forums can be found in the WOODWEB sitemap.

    When posting your question on the forum, be sure to include a reference to the knowledge base article that inspired your question. The more information you provide in your question, the better your chances of getting an answer.

    Letters, questions or comments? Email us and let us know what you think. Be sure to check out our FAQ page.

    Contact us to discuss announcements or report issues with this site.

    WOODWEB editors, writers and staff strive to promote safe practices. What is safe for a carpenter under certain conditions may not be safe for others under other circumstances. Readers should undertake to use the materials and methods discussed in WOODWEB after such evaluation and at their own risk.

    WOODWEB, Inc.
    Via Bedella, 335
    Montrose, PA 18801

    Request
    When I leave a 2 1/2 inch radius on the outside corner of a countertop using contact concrete, I often notice that the laminate doesn’t stick in straight spots. Some people like to fill these areas with Bondo or squeeze out some super glue to get the glue done. Why does this occur and what are the solutions? I am thinking of gluing only the areas of the radius in white.

    Forum replies
    (Laminate and Solid Surface Forum)
    From collaborator J:
    The beam is not cut at a 90 degree angle. This causes the edge to move up or down. When you force it to go straight around the corner, it makes gaps appear. If you cut the corner with a router and a template, these gaps will disappear.

    From collaborator K:
    I have been laminating 1 “beams on 1-1 / 2” countertops for years without using any adhesive other than normal spray concrete. The laminate is for general use and is full thickness formed (the bottom has not been sanded to a thinner size). For this to work, the laminate must be heated to a relaxed state that allows the material to form in the core. It is not something that can be cooled down. Additionally, there are several brands of laminate that will be more likely to break due to the physical properties of the sheets. In these situations, I usually increase the radius to two inches and increase the protrusion at the front edge or end of the core to make sure the top covers the cabinet and door. It is important to ensure that the core, as mentioned in the previous post, is cut at real radii rather than roughly cut with a jigsaw and / or formed by a belt sander. After cutting the radius, use a block to smooth the transition where the radius meets the straight edge to remove any small imperfections. If the area appears rough, it will increase the chance of the laminate cracking as it forms around the core. Make sure the beam is smooth, remove excess dust and coat properly with glue.

    It is best to find out how the laminate reacts to heat. Buy a commercial heat gun for around $ 100 to $ 125 (we’ve been using Bosch for years, but there are other good brands on the market) and cut some of the laminate hoops to the width you normally use. We cut the width to 1/8 “of the actual thickness of the core. Then we use a heat gun, good gloves while the laminate warms up and safety glasses, we start by heating the strips one by one and observing the movement of the laminate as it heats up 325 degrees Fahrenheit Some stores use a heat-sensitive material that is brushed on the edge to indicate the correct temperature, however, as you learn this procedure you will learn to look for the properties the laminate will show when it “relaxes” and loses its manufacturing memory. relaxation of the material when the perimeter tape is applied vertically and heated.

    Once the material is at the right temperature, it is necessary to work quickly to form the laminate to the edge of the core before it cools. So the gloves really help because the piece is hot. After forming the corner, work together with the rest of the edges, keeping the laminate firmly against the core. This usually eliminates the need to pinch the corner when cooling. Don’t hesitate to heat gun on the periphery for too long on the specimens and make sure they are coated with glue to duplicate the actual results when laminating the core. Find out how long it takes to boil a piece of laminate or from too much heat, then limit the heating time of the material from the result. The actual process, when done correctly, takes much less time than typing this answer.

    When you learn to do this correctly, it can make a big difference in how you can sell countertops to customers by making the outside corners of each countertop safer in busy areas of your home by eliminating the tight curves someone is walking on. after. It also reduces dents in your children’s heads as they grow up. A final benefit is that it removes the dark line and the area where the laminate can snag and break. We’ve all seen a cracked corner of a countertop in a kitchen, shop or office as the countertop has been laminated using the standard square edge machining process.

    Are you familiar with the following related areas of the Knowledge Base?

  • Knowledge base: Knowledge base
  • Knowledge base: Laminates and solid surfaces
  • KnowledgeBase: Laminates & Solid Surfacing: Fabrication Techniques

    Do you want to add information to this article? . Click here

    If you have a question about an article in the Knowledge Base, your best bet is to search for related articles in the entire Knowledge Base or post your question to the appropriate WOODWEB forum. Before posting your post, please review our Forum Guidelines.

    Questions entered in the comment form for a Knowledge Base article will not generate an answer! A list of the WOODWEB forums can be found in the WOODWEB sitemap.

    When posting your question on the forum, be sure to include a reference to the knowledge base article that inspired your question. The more information you provide in your question, the better your chances of getting an answer.

    Letters, questions or comments? Email us and let us know what you think. Be sure to check out our FAQ page.

    Contact us to discuss announcements or report issues with this site.

    WOODWEB editors, writers and staff strive to promote safe practices. What is safe for a carpenter under certain conditions may not be safe for others under other circumstances. Readers should undertake to use the materials and methods discussed in WOODWEB after such evaluation and at their own risk.

    WOODWEB, Inc.
    Via Bedella, 335
    Montrose, PA 18801

    However,folding of the laminate it’s not impossible. Based on the size and type of the curve laminatoooyou use, youPothiszacontinue to create a rounded counter design withlaminatooo.

    Additionally, how do you make this laminate or flooring simple? In order to manthiserethisstraight floor and square, start layingthislaminatooo away fromthiswall becausethiswall may not be simple. Measure away fromthiswallthiswidth of one piece of flooringand add 1/4 inch (for example, ifflooring is 5 inches wide, measure out 5 1/4 inches) and snap a chalk line acrossthisroom.

    Just so, where do you start when laying laminatooo flooring?

    Start posing this first row onthislongest wall, withthistrimmed edges ofthisplanks againstthiswall. Start onthisright side and work leftward. Lay down a full-size plank againstthiswall, spacing it about 1/4 inch away fromthiswall. Placing spacers betweenthisflooring andthiswall Pothisza help maintain this gap.

    How do you fix a laminatooo floor that is lifting?

    To liftthisfloor boards, starting along one wall, until you reachthiserect Section. To do renovation tothissubfloor if needed. Replace any damaged boards with new pieces and laythisfloor returns to its original position. Use a wood block and hammer to tapthisrows together snugly so that they are less likely to separate.