How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde

How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The “dumb blonde” stereotype is simply wrong, according to a new national study of young baby boomers.

The study of 10,878 Americans found that white women who said their natural hair color was blonde had an average IQ score within 3 points of brunettes and those with red or black hair.

While jokes about blondes may seem harmless to some, it can have real-world implications, said Jay Zagorsky, author of the study and a research scientist at The Ohio State University.

“Research shows that stereotypes often have an impact on hiring, promotions and other social experiences,” Zagorsky said.

How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde
Jay Zagorsky

“This study provides compelling evidence that there shouldn’t be any discrimination against blondes based on their intelligence.”

The study found that the average IQ of blondes was actually slightly higher than those with other hair colors, but that finding isn’t statistically significant, said Zagorsky, who works in the university’s Center for Human Resource Research (CHRR).

“I don’t think you can say with certainty that blondes are smarter than others, but you can definitely say they are not any dumber.”

The results for blond white men were similar – they also had IQs roughly equal to men with other hair colors.

The study was published last week in the journal Economics Bulletin.

Data from the study came from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79), a national survey of people who were between 14 and 21 years old when they were first interviewed in 1979.

The NLSY79 is conducted by CHRR for the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

In 1980, participants in the NLSY79 took the Armed Forces Qualification Test, or AFQT, which is used by the Pentagon to determine the intelligence of all recruits. The overall AFQT score is based on word knowledge, paragraph comprehension, math knowledge and arithmetic reasoning.

In 1985, all participants were asked, “What is your natural hair color?”

To eliminate any bias in the IQ tests caused by ethnic and racial differences, Zagorsky dropped all African Americans and Hispanics from the analysis.

The resulting findings showed that blonde-haired white women had an average IQ of 103.2, compared to 102.7 for those with brown hair, 101.2 for those with red hair and 100.5 for those with black hair.

Blonde women were slightly more likely to be in the highest IQ category than those with other hair colors, and slightly less likely to be in the lowest IQ category.

The study can’t say whether there are any genetic relationships between hair color and intelligence, but Zagorsky did find one fact that could at least partially explain why blondes showed slightly higher intelligence: They grew up in homes with more reading material than did those with any other hair color.

“If blondes have any slight advantage, it may simply be that they were more likely to grow up in homes with more intellectual stimulation,” he said.

Zagorsky noted that more women than expected in the NLSY79 reported that they were blonde. In the survey, 20.7 percent of white women reported being blonde, compared to only 17.1 percent of men. Assuming that hair color is not related to gender and that men were less likely to color their hair, Zagorsky said the results suggest that about 3.5 percent of women reported their natural hair color as blonde when it was not.

Zagorsky said he couldn’t say for sure how that may have affected the results, but he said the major finding was almost certainly still true: Blondes could hold their own intellectually with those of any other hair color.

How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The “dumb blonde” stereotype is simply wrong, according to a new national study of young baby boomers.

The study of 10,878 Americans found that white women who said their natural hair color was blonde had an average IQ score within 3 points of brunettes and those with red or black hair.

While jokes about blondes may seem harmless to some, it can have real-world implications, said Jay Zagorsky, author of the study and a research scientist at The Ohio State University.

“Research shows that stereotypes often have an impact on hiring, promotions and other social experiences,” Zagorsky said.

How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde
Jay Zagorsky

“This study provides compelling evidence that there shouldn’t be any discrimination against blondes based on their intelligence.”

The study found that the average IQ of blondes was actually slightly higher than those with other hair colors, but that finding isn’t statistically significant, said Zagorsky, who works in the university’s Center for Human Resource Research (CHRR).

“I don’t think you can say with certainty that blondes are smarter than others, but you can definitely say they are not any dumber.”

The results for blond white men were similar – they also had IQs roughly equal to men with other hair colors.

The study was published last week in the journal Economics Bulletin.

Data from the study came from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79), a national survey of people who were between 14 and 21 years old when they were first interviewed in 1979.

The NLSY79 is conducted by CHRR for the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

In 1980, participants in the NLSY79 took the Armed Forces Qualification Test, or AFQT, which is used by the Pentagon to determine the intelligence of all recruits. The overall AFQT score is based on word knowledge, paragraph comprehension, math knowledge and arithmetic reasoning.

In 1985, all participants were asked, “What is your natural hair color?”

To eliminate any bias in the IQ tests caused by ethnic and racial differences, Zagorsky dropped all African Americans and Hispanics from the analysis.

The resulting findings showed that blonde-haired white women had an average IQ of 103.2, compared to 102.7 for those with brown hair, 101.2 for those with red hair and 100.5 for those with black hair.

Blonde women were slightly more likely to be in the highest IQ category than those with other hair colors, and slightly less likely to be in the lowest IQ category.

The study can’t say whether there are any genetic relationships between hair color and intelligence, but Zagorsky did find one fact that could at least partially explain why blondes showed slightly higher intelligence: They grew up in homes with more reading material than did those with any other hair color.

“If blondes have any slight advantage, it may simply be that they were more likely to grow up in homes with more intellectual stimulation,” he said.

Zagorsky noted that more women than expected in the NLSY79 reported that they were blonde. In the survey, 20.7 percent of white women reported being blonde, compared to only 17.1 percent of men. Assuming that hair color is not related to gender and that men were less likely to color their hair, Zagorsky said the results suggest that about 3.5 percent of women reported their natural hair color as blonde when it was not.

Zagorsky said he couldn’t say for sure how that may have affected the results, but he said the major finding was almost certainly still true: Blondes could hold their own intellectually with those of any other hair color.

We know blondes are supposed to have more fun, but there’s a much more damaging stereotype you’ve also likely heard: They’re dumb. But not only are blondes just as smart as women with other hair colors, according to a new study, labeling them as “dumb blondes” can have negative effects on their careers.

Researchers at The Ohio State University studied 10,878 Americans—men and women—who answered a series of questions from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics meant to determine their intelligence over almost a decade. The study concluded that white women with natural blonde hair had an average IQ within three points of women with other color hair—brunettes, redheads, and women with black hair included. In fact, the average IQ of blondes was slightly higher than those with other hair color.

The “dumb blonde” stereotype persists, however—and apparently it has some serious consequences. “Research shows that stereotypes often have an impact on hiring, promotions, and other social experiences,” said Jay Zagorsky, author of the study and a research scientist at The Ohio State University. “This study provides compelling evidence that there shouldn’t be any discrimination against blondes based on their intelligence.”

The study couldn’t posit whether there are genetic reasons hair color and intelligence could be correlated, but the researchers have one hint at why blondes might have slightly higher intelligence: They often grow up in homes with more reading material than women with any other hair color.

“If blondes have any slight advantage, it may simply be that they were more likely to grow up in homes with more intellectual stimulation,” said Zagorsky.

So the next time you’re tempted to equate being blonde with a lack of smarts, think again: They’re not just as smart (or smarter!) than the next gal, they’re also just as deserving of that job or promotion.

We know blondes are supposed to have more fun, but there’s a much more damaging stereotype you’ve also likely heard: They’re dumb. But not only are blondes just as smart as women with other hair colors, according to a new study, labeling them as “dumb blondes” can have negative effects on their careers.

Researchers at The Ohio State University studied 10,878 Americans—men and women—who answered a series of questions from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics meant to determine their intelligence over almost a decade. The study concluded that white women with natural blonde hair had an average IQ within three points of women with other color hair—brunettes, redheads, and women with black hair included. In fact, the average IQ of blondes was slightly higher than those with other hair color.

The “dumb blonde” stereotype persists, however—and apparently it has some serious consequences. “Research shows that stereotypes often have an impact on hiring, promotions, and other social experiences,” said Jay Zagorsky, author of the study and a research scientist at The Ohio State University. “This study provides compelling evidence that there shouldn’t be any discrimination against blondes based on their intelligence.”

The study couldn’t posit whether there are genetic reasons hair color and intelligence could be correlated, but the researchers have one hint at why blondes might have slightly higher intelligence: They often grow up in homes with more reading material than women with any other hair color.

“If blondes have any slight advantage, it may simply be that they were more likely to grow up in homes with more intellectual stimulation,” said Zagorsky.

So the next time you’re tempted to equate being blonde with a lack of smarts, think again: They’re not just as smart (or smarter!) than the next gal, they’re also just as deserving of that job or promotion.

In defying the dumb blonde trope, Reese Witherspoon gave us a new kind of female protagonist to root for.

How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde

I n 1966 Dolly Parton released ‘Dumb Blonde’, an infectious pop song that has since become an anthem for a hair colour wrongly associated with low intellect. Like Dolly, Robert Luketic’s 2001 film Legally Blonde, starring Reese Witherspoon as sorority-girl-turned-law-student Elle Woods, has resonated with viewers for its strong feminist message: you don’t have to change who you are to be successful in this world.

Despite having to contend with Harvard Law School, her heartless ex boyfriend, and his snotty new fiancée, Elle’s greatest fight is against her hair colour. The origins of the ‘dumb blonde’ stereotype are unknown but many historians believe that the first officially recorded dumb blonde dates all the way back to 1775. A Parisian courtesan named Rosalie Duthé inspired a satirical play called ‘Les Curiosités de la Foire’, as she had a reputation for pausing for extended periods before speaking, thus wrongly attributing stupidity to the starlet and subsequent golden-haired beauties.

Cinema long has been plagued by the dumb blonde stereotype, ever since Marilyn Monroe leapt off the screen in 1953’s Gentlemen Prefer Blondes with Jane Russell, the smart and capable brunette, at her side. Women are continually maligned and underestimated simply for the colour of their hair, and this is where Elle Woods finds herself. A few shades darker and Legally Blonde would be an entirely different movie.

One glance at the film’s poster – with Elle’s gleaming strands and hot pink dress taking centre stage as her fellow students look on aghast behind her – and it’s easy to see why there were initial misconceptions around its intended message. Elle is introduced through a haze of makeup, designer fashion and Cosmo magazines in a world where the ‘strong woman’ stereotype has gripped the media and innate femininity is deemed a weakness.

How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde

The very first shot of the film sees Elle gently brushing her hair. However, a dinner date with her soon-to-be-ex Warner (Matthew Davis) leaves Elle crying on her way home – her hair painted as the villain of the piece, something she can’t shake off. In his pursuit of becoming a senator, Warner ditches Elle to find himself a “Jackie, not a Marilyn”. Elle’s hair is presented as an obstacle, not an asset. This is never more apparent than upon her arrival at Harvard. With her chihuahua Bruiser in tow, Elle sticks out like a sore thumb and, throughout her time there, her professors and fellow students punish her for it.

Elle’s not-so-feminist motivation for attending law school is so that she can become the “serious” woman Warner has always wanted. It’s here the film’s message is revealed. Elle is persecuted because of the way she looks, but rather than letting it define or defeat her, she instead gradually begins to thrive at Harvard after being told she is “not good enough” one too many times.

Elle reverses the dumb blonde stereotype by throwing herself into her studies, discovering her true worth amounts to more than her superficial beauty. Her determination to succeed in this hostile, male-dominated setting eventually overshadows her desire to win back her man. Notably for a film released in the early 2000s – a time when physical and behavioural makeovers were particularly prevalent in popular culture – Elle never sacrifices her identity or her signature blonde locks.

This era’s obsession with strong female characters has narrowed the path for the girly girls who do not possess necessarily masculine traits. Elle’s strength is derived from the things she loves and the heartfelt way she cares about people as a whole. Witherspoon’s performance, with all its infectious charm and beaming positivity, defies the shallow, vapid blonde trope, giving us a new kind of female protagonist to root for.

It’s telling that when Elle defends murder suspect Brooke Windham (Ali Larter) towards the end of the film, she reenters the courtroom head-to-toe in hot pink. Inspiring a generation of young girls, she dispels the idea that a woman can only be perceived as smart and strong if they reject outright femininity and embrace more masculine qualities. Her fierce determination is the driving force of Legally Blonde, and the film’s enduring legacy is a direct result of that. Twenty years on, one thing remains clear – Elle Woods is an icon for the ages.

How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde

They say a lot of things about blondes, especially that they’re somehow dumber than average women. Truth is, nobody really knows how this stereotype came to be, but this doesn’t stop people from perpetuating it even further. There are a few other stereotypes associated with blondes, stereotypes that we’ll go through over the next few minutes while trying to figure out to what extent do these stereotypes have any basis in real life.

Needless to say, there are also quite a few jokes out there about blondes as well, and they all revolve around the notion that blondes are either dumb, easy, self-centered. Without further ado, here are the ten most widespread stereotypes about blondes that for the most part, are completely untrue.

10 Blondes can’t drive

Some say that the myth according to which blondes can’t drive originates in the many jokes about how worse women are at driving than men. To some extent, this might actually be true given how popular are the jokes regarding women drivers. Combine that with the many other stereotypes about blondes and you have yourself a reason why people might consider blonde women to be bad drivers.

9 The get away with everything

People also say about blondes that they seem to be getting away with a lot more than other women, mostly due to them being seen as more attractive and outgoing. As you may imagine, this isn’t always true in real life where blondes have to put just as much effort into succeeding as women with differently colored hair. What’s worse about this stereotype is that it’s reinforced by various films and tv productions of our time.

8 Blondes are weak

Another interesting stereotype about blondes is that they’re weak and overly sensitive. Again, nobody really knows where this stereotype originated, although it seems to have everything to do with their rarity. You see, women with blonde hair, especially those with brightly colored eyes, will always stand out in a crowd. Because people see tham as a rare item to be stared at, they will also project many of their own insecurities upon them.

7 They’re only interested in how they look

For this particular stereotype, we have nothing but Hollywood to blame. For years, Hollywood productions have perpetuated the unjust stereotype that blondes are somehow more interested in their own good looks than other issues. Yet again, it would be hard to point out what exactly possessed them to do such a thing, but it seems that every single blonde actress in any Hollywood production released over the past twenty years has been pretty and that her role was one that involved using her looks to her advantage.

6 Blondes are popular

Yet another myth made popular by movies and TV shows is that of the popular blonde girl. Whether it’s about high school students or a supporting character in an action movie, blondes always seem to be extremely popular and social. For some reason, these stereotypes found their way outside the screen and into real life where even for reasons unknown to them, people consider blondes to be popular.

5 They are self-centered

We mentioned earlier how rare blondes are, especially those with brightly colored eyes. Well, it seems that because of their popularity, they are often perceived as self-centered and narcissistic, which isn’t really the case. Nevertheless, this stereotype has lead to people seeing blondes as conceited, which forces them to deal with holstility and anger without any fault of their own.

4 Blondes are privileged

Another interesting stereotype is that of the priviledged blonde. For some reason, people sometimes think that blondes have aristocratic backgrounds and that they have a different social status than most. Again, this is mostly because of the many big-screen productions depicting blondes as being rich and priviledged, with very little basis in real life. This also leads people to believe that because of their position, blondes wouldn’t be able to look after themselves properly.

3 They are promiscuous

People also consider blondes to be promiscuous based on nothing but their own insecurities. This might be because of how poorly blondes are represented in movies and TV productions where they only serve as eye-candy or as supporting roles for the male leads. Because of how attractive most of these actresses are, people will also presume that this is how most women are in real life, an issue that blondes have had to deal with since the days of Marilyn Monroe.

2 Blondes are attractive

Although there are plenty of unattractive blondes out there, the ones people seem to always focus are always more than average in the looks department. Be them singers, movie stars, or socialites, it seems that people have this preconceived notion that famous blondes are all attractive. Again, this myth is constantly being perpetuated by our society be it voluntarily or not, and the fact that women will sometimes dye their hair blonde to make themselves prettier certainly doesn’t help.

1 Blonde girls are stupid

This is perhaps the most widespread and popular stereotype that blondes have to deal with. For some reason, people have this preconceived belief that blondes are dumber than your average woman, a myth that has ancient origins actually. It is believed that this stereotype was started by ancient Romans who viewed their Germanic neighbors to the north as being savage and barbaric. Because most of these people had blond hair, it was just a matter of time until the stereotype of the dumb blonde person appeared, a stereotype that is alive and well to this day.

How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde

How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde

How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde

How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde

How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde

Blonde stereotypes are stereotypes of blond-haired women. Wikipedia

Blonde jokes are a joke cycle based on a stereotype of a dumb blonde woman. These jokes about people, generally women, who have blonde hair serve as a form of blonde versus brunette rivalry. Wikipedia

How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde

Rivalry—whether real, imagined, or fictional—between women with blond hair and those with brown hair. (The color of brown hair is often called brunette). Wikipedia

How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde

Hair color characterized by low levels of the dark pigment eumelanin. The resultant visible hue depends on various factors, but always has some yellowish color. Wikipedia

Stereotype that members of one group have about the way in which they are stereotypically viewed by members of another group. Stereotype about a stereotype. Wikipedia

How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde

Protagonist of Amanda Brown’s 2001 novel Legally Blonde and the 2001 film of the same name, as well as a sequel, Legally Blonde 2: Red, White and Blonde. Also portrayed in the Broadway adaptation of the same name. Wikipedia

How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde

Situational predicament in which people are or feel themselves to be at risk of conforming to stereotypes about their social group. Purportedly a contributing factor to long-standing racial and gender gaps in academic performance. Wikipedia

How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde

Dollar Bill Spencer’s wife must be the only person in town who does not understand how dastardly he is

How to become a stereotypical dumb blonde

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Lately on “The Bold and the Beautiful” the character of Brooke Logan seems to be no more than a trophy wife. Since marrying Dollar Bill Spencer, she no longer seems to have a valuable role and is mostly in the background of other members of the Forrester and Spencer families. If she does not get a good storyline soon, Brooke is going to look like the stereotypical Dumb Blonde .

Being Mrs. Bill Spencer has diminished Brooke to second class status

Ever since she married Dollar Bill, there has not been a strong storyline for Brooke. She is just around the periphery of her family and friends, showing up like a dutiful trophy wife to dote on her husband once in a while.

This is compounded by the fact that her spouse, stepson, and niece through marriage are in the middle of the biggest plot on “The Bold and the Beautiful” right now.

Deception is all around Ms. Logan/Spencer, but she is not picking up on any of it. Brooke has so much more to offer than appearing like the stereotypical dumb blonde. She does not know that Bill said that the fashion show in Monte Carlo was a tie, when “Spectra Fashions” actually won out over ‘Forrester Creations. Liam however just figured it all out. Dollar Bill lied to Thomas that Caroline is dying, which caused him to leave Sally and Spectra, and move to New York.

The biggest secret that her hubby is keeping from her is that he could be charged with arson.

Bill had Justin pay someone to burn the Spectra building and admitted it to Liam. Now his son wants him to take leave of absence or be turned in to the authorities. Brooke is unaware that her spouse is being blackmailed by his own son. He also lied to Thomas that Caroline was dying, in order to get him away from Sally and Spectra.

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Brooke is more than a dumb blonde and trophy wife

On Friday, Brooke showed up at “Spencer Publications” to pay her hubby a visit. She began giving him a massage as Dollar Bill began talking about how you cannot be successful by doing things the right way, adding that he had everything in the palm of his hand and lost it. Ms. Logan/Spencer tells him that whatever “it” is he can get it back.

Bill jumps up and moves away from her as he thinks about the situation he is in.