How to be an openly gay christian

The issue of homosexuality is very controversial, even among Christians. Many wonder if it is possible to be a gay Christian. What does the Bible teach?

First, we must be clear that there is a distinction between same sex attraction and same sex sexual activity. A person may have desires or attractions to someone of the same sex whether as a Christian or non-Christian. These desires do not automatically go away when a person becomes a Christian. However, the Bible is very clear that gay sexual activity is considered sinful and that a Christian is not to take part in such activities.

Same sex activity was called an “abomination” in the Old Testament (Leviticus 18:22), and the New Testament likewise addresses same sex activity as sinful. Romans 1:26-27 notes gay activity as “unnatural” while 1 Corinthians 6:9-10 lists same sex activity as something done by those who will “not inherit the kingdom of God.”

Interestingly, however, the verse that immediately follows this list of sins states, “And such were some of you. But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and by the Spirit of our God” (1 Corinthians 6:11). Clearly, some of the Corinthian Christians had previously been involved in same sex activity. However, once they trusted in Jesus Christ for salvation, they were given new life and were called to live differently.

While same sex activity is condemned as sinful throughout Scripture, it is also not listed as a “worse” sin than any other sin. In fact, Paul’s list includes, “the sexually immoral, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor men who practice homosexuality, nor thieves, nor the greedy, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor swindlers” (1 Corinthians 6:9-10).

In summary, a person with same sex attraction can be a Christian. In addition, a Christian may sometimes fall to temptations in the area of same sex activity. However, same sex activity is sinful in the Bible and is prohibited from a Christian’s lifestyle. Those who regularly practice and/or approve of same sex activity and claim to be a Christian may not actually be a Christian as noted in Paul’s statement to the Corinthian Christians. Regardless, same sex activity is no more or less sinful than any other sin. Ultimately, Christians are called to show love to all people while also standing firm regarding biblical convictions related to same sex activity.

1. The term “homosexual” didn’t exist until 1892. Some modern Bible translations say that “homosexuals” will not inherit the kingdom of God, but neither the concept nor the word for people with exclusive same-sex attraction existed before the late 19th century. While the Bible rejects lustful same-sex behavior, that’s very different from a condemnation of all gay people and relationships.

2. Sexual orientation is a new concept—one that the Christian tradition hasn’t addressed. Many Christians draw on their faith’s traditions to shape their beliefs, but the concept of sexual orientation is new. Until recent decades, same-sex behavior was placed in the same category with gluttony or drunkenness — as a vice of excess anyone might be prone to — not as the expression of a sexual orientation. The Christian tradition has never spoken to the modern issue of LGBT people and their relationships.

3. Celibacy is a gift, not a mandate. The Bible honors celibacy as a good way of living — Jesus was celibate, after all — but it also makes clear that celibacy must be a voluntary choice. Requiring that all gay people remain celibate is at odds with the Bible’s teachings on celibacy, which are grounded Scripture’s core affirmation that God’s physical creation is good.

4. Condemning same-sex relationships is harmful to the LGBT community. Jesus taught in the Sermon on the Mount that good trees bear good fruit, while bad trees bear bad fruit. The church’s rejection of same-sex relationships has caused tremendous, needless suffering to the LGBT community—bad fruit. Those harmful consequences should make Christians open to reconsidering the church’s traditional teaching.

5. Sodom and Gomorrah involved an attempted gang rape, not a loving relationship. It’s commonly assumed that God destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah out of his wrath against same-sex relations, but the only form of same-sex behavior described in the story is an attempted gang rape — nothing like a loving, committed relationship. The Bible explicitly condemns Sodom for its arrogance, inhospitality and apathy toward the poor — not for same-sex behavior.

6. The prohibitions in Leviticus don’t apply to Christians. Leviticus condemns male same-sex intercourse, but the entire Old Testament law code has never applied to Christians in light of Christ’s death. Leviticus also condemns eating pork, rabbit, or shellfish, cutting hair at the sides of one’s head, and having sex during a woman’s menstrual period — none of which Christians continue to observe.

7. Paul condemns same-sex lust, not love. Like other ancient writers, Paul described same-sex behavior as the result of excessive sexual desire on the part of people who could be content with opposite-sex relationships. He didn’t have long-term, loving same-sex relationships in view. And while he described same-sex behavior as “unnatural,” he also said men having long hair goes against nature, and most Christians read that as a reference to cultural conventions.

8. Marriage is about commitment. Marriage often involves procreation, but according to the New Testament, it’s based on something deeper: a lifelong commitment to a partner. Marriage is even compared to the relationship between Christ and the church, and while the language used is opposite-sex, the core principles apply just as well to same-sex couples.

9. Human beings are relational. From the beginning of Genesis, human beings are described as having a need for relationship, just as God himself is relational. Sexuality is a core part of what it means to be a relational person, and to condemn LGBT people’s sexuality outright damages their ability to be in relationship with all people — and with God.

10. Faithful Christians are already embracing LGBT brothers and sisters. Mainstream denominations like Presbyterians and Episcopalians now ordain openly gay clergy, and there are seeds of change in evangelical churches as well. This November, the Reformation Project will host a training conference for up to 900 LGBT-affirming Christians in Washington, D.C.—and the movement for change in conservative churches is just getting started.

Matthew Vines is the author of God and the Gay Christian and is the founder of The Reformation Project, a Bible-based non-profit organization that seeks to reform church teaching on sexual orientation and gender identity. Matthew lives in Wichita, Kansas.

“Believr,” a new app, seeks to provide a safe haven for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Christians who embrace their LGBTQ identity.

Adam Evers introduced Believr on Thursday, June 3. Their website states that the app intends to help LGBTQ Christians find “belonging, connection and love,” Religion News reported.

“The heartache of the LGBTQ+ Christian community has been accumulating for generations,” states their story section. “We have felt placeless – being too gay for the Christian spaces and too Christian for the LGBTQ+ spaces. After coming out, that heartache became real when Adam was removed from a fundamentalist church and when Brandon returned from an evangelical missions program without a spiritual home.”

How it started

Evers, who identifies as a “gay Christian,” was inspired to create the app while attending a conference put on by Q Christian Fellowship, an organization that serves LGBTQ Christians. Bothered that there was no app to connect with LGBTQ people who identify as Christians in his area, he and co-founder Brandon Flanery started working on Believr approximately two years ago.

Evers said that it began as a dating app in his quest to find a companion, but it soon evolved into a larger community when its early supporters convened for weekly Zoom meetings throughout the first year of pandemic.

What the app does in a nutshell

As a dating app for persons who identify as LGBTQ, the app features “values-based matching” where users will choose the 5 values that are most important to them from a list of 72 options, and are matched accordingly.

It also has “community spaces” where users may connect over a variety of themes, including faith, location, and gender identity.

Additionally, the group has launched a podcast featuring LGBTQ Christian leaders and has sponsored worship evenings on Facebook. “Spectrum,” a premium membership with extra features such as communal areas and premium memberships, is also available.

Evers said that Believr is all about making connections, whatever that may mean.

“If that means friendship, that means romantic relationship, that means something else, great. But ultimately, we want to connect people together,” he said.

The need for the app

“I believe the LGBTQ+ Christian space is much bigger than people realize or think,” Evers said. “It’s much bigger than myself. There’s a community, and there’s a need.”

He cited a 2020 survey from the UCLA School of Law’s Williams Institute, which indicated that over half of all LGBTQ individuals in the United States identify as religious. According to the survey, more over 4.1 million of those people claim to be Christians.

On a personal level, Evers told RNS that he’s “either too gay for Christian spaces or too Christian for gay spaces or queer spaces.”

He often felt torn between two worlds as a homosexual Christian. He shared that his faith profession was often an impediment in LGBTQ settings, since so many people in the community had been injured by churches who think same-sex relationships are incompatible with Scripture.

On the other hand, he has been ostracized from Christian settings. He said he was kicked out of John Piper’s Bethlehem Baptist Church in Minneapolis because of his sexuality while he was in college.

Being “Christian” and being “gay” at the same time

Evers’s new platform is different from other groups that refute Bible verses “condemning homosexuality.” It describes itself simply as a safe space for Christians who identify as part of the LGBTQ+ demographic to belong, where they can establish connections, friendships and even romantic relationships with fellow LGBTQ+ people.

It’s important to note that Believr was created to meet a “need” its founders personally had. Evers indicated that he himself was looking for a “partner” but couldn’t find one because there’s no “space” where that partner could be. “How am I supposed to find a husband if I don’t create this space?” he said.

That said, Believr is not for Christians who are struggling with same-sex attraction. It is very different from other groups or platforms such as Equipped to Love, which was found by a former gay man named Ken Williams.

Real intimacy that only Jesus can give

When he was eight years old, Williams noticed that he wasn’t like the other boys his age. He didn’t like sports or the typical rough activities boys liked. This often led to his being bullied and being called a “gay wad” or “shrimp.” His own father, responding to the bullying, enrolled him in activities such as soccer, karate, baseball, and Boy Scouts, but he still failed in them. Instead, he preferred “deep conversations” with his mom and her friends.

Eventually, Williams was exposed to pornography, which led to various feelings, such as being “so damaged” and “dirty” over something that had been “awakened.” Years later, he started acting on his feelings and became physically engaged with fellow boys in the hopes of getting “attention and connection.”

Eventually, Williams wrote a letter expressing his anguish over his struggles and shared it with his youth pastor who “lovingly committed” to help him, along with his parents. He received Christian counseling for five years and eventually realized that changing one’s sexual desires is actually possible.

Williams wrote a book detailing how Christ set him free and restored him to his true identity. In the book, titled “The Journey Out: How I Followed Jesus Away From Gay,” he shares how “God’s best plan for us is not to pursue homosexuality,” and how Jesus offers “real inner healing and intimate relationship,” which is something that gay “pride” can never give.

He also founded two ministries, Equipped to Love and the CHANGED Movement. The first aims to “show the truth of Biblically-defined sexuality to the LGBTQ community” and the second aims to provide support to those who left their LGBTQ identities to embrace who they are in Christ.

“Do you not know that the unrighteous will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived; neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor effeminate, nor homosexuals, nor thieves, nor the covetous, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor swindlers, will inherit the kingdom of God” (1 Corinthians 6:9-10). There is a tendency to declare homosexuality as the worst of all sins. While it is undeniable, biblically speaking, that homosexuality is immoral and unnatural (Romans 1:26-27), in no sense does the Bible describe homosexuality as an unforgivable sin. Nor does the Bible teach that homosexuality is a sin Christians will never struggle against.

Perhaps that is the key phrase in the question of whether it is possible to be a gay Christian: “struggle against.” It is possible for a Christian to struggle with homosexual temptations. Many homosexuals who become Christians have ongoing struggles with homosexual feelings and desires. Some strongly heterosexual men and women have experienced a “spark” of homosexual interest at some point in their lives. Whether or not these desires and temptations exist does not determine whether a person is a Christian. The Bible is clear that no Christian is sinless (1 John 1:8,10). While the specific sin / temptation varies from one Christian to another, all Christians have struggles with sin, and all Christians sometimes fail in those struggles (1 Corinthians 10:13).

What differentiates a Christian’s life from a non-Christian’s life is the struggle against sin. The Christian life is a progressive journey of overcoming the “acts of the flesh” (Galatians 5:19-21) and allowing God’s Spirit to produce the “fruit of the Spirit” (Galatians 5:22-23). Yes, Christians sin, sometimes horribly. Sadly, sometimes Christians are indistinguishable from non-Christians. However, a true Christian will always repent, will always eventually return to God, and will always resume the struggle against sin. But the Bible gives no support for the idea that a person who perpetually and unrepentantly engages in sin can indeed be a Christian. Notice 1 Corinthians 6:11, “And that is what some of you were. But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and by the Spirit of our God.”

First Corinthians 6:9-10 lists sins that, if indulged in continuously, identify a person as not being redeemed—not being a Christian. Often, homosexuality is singled out from this list. If a person struggles with homosexual temptations, that person is presumed to be unsaved. If a person actually engages in homosexual acts, that person is definitely thought to be unsaved. However, the same assumptions are not made, at least not with the same emphasis, regarding other sins in the list: fornication (pre-marital sex), idolatry, adultery, thievery, covetousness, alcoholism, slander, and deceit. It is inconsistent, for example, to declare those guilty of pre-marital sex as “disobedient Christians,” while declaring homosexuals definitively non-Christians.

Is it possible to be a gay Christian? If the phrase “gay Christian” refers to a person who struggles against homosexual desires and temptations – yes, a “gay Christian” is possible. However, the description “gay Christian” is not accurate for such a person, since he/she does not desire to be gay, and is struggling against the temptations. Such a person is not a “gay Christian,” but rather is simply a struggling Christian, just as there are Christians who struggle with fornication, lying, and stealing. If the phrase “gay Christian” refers to a person who actively, perpetually, and unrepentantly lives a homosexual lifestyle – no, it is not possible for such a person to truly be a Christian.

‘Torn’: Living As An Openly Gay Christian

How to be an openly gay christian

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Justin Lee was raised in a conservative Southern Baptist home. He had two loving parents, and was deeply committed to his faith. In school, classmates even referred to him as “God Boy” because of his devotion.

But, as he was entering high school, Lee’s whole world began to change, as he came face-to-face with feelings that he’d tried for many years to suppress.

“I didn’t know I was gay at first, because I was the kid who was preaching against folks accepting themselves as gay,” he tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered.

Lee formed the Gay Christian Network in 2001 to try and help other gay Christian kids and their families talk to one another, as well as with their respective churches. His new book is called Torn: Rescuing the Gospel from the Gays Vs. Christians Debate.

Interview Highlights

On coming out

“I absolutely believed it was a sinful choice to be gay. But I knew that I was attracted to guys and I kept thinking that was a phase I would grow out of. And as the years went by and I wasn’t growing out of this phase, I got to the point that I was just crying myself to sleep, night after night, begging God, ‘Please don’t let me feel this anymore.’ When I turned to the Christians I most respected in my life — my parents and my friends and my pastors — I found that they didn’t have a lot of answers for me, other than just don’t be gay. And I thought, well, I could not act on my feelings. I could not talk about my feelings. But I can’t make myself straight. So that really sent me on this journey trying to figure out how do we address this as a church.”

On being ‘too gay’ or ‘too Christian’

“I talk to people still every day who are just living in that constant feeling of being alone, and it’s very depressing when you feel like nobody understands you. You feel like you’ve been caught up in the midst of this culture war between the gay folks on one side and the Christians on the other side. And here you are, a gay Christian, and there’s no place for you.”

How to be an openly gay christian

Justin Lee is the founder and executive director of the Gay Christian Network. Amy Lee/Jericho Books hide caption

A gay guy gets up in the morning, does something, and nobody writes about it. Now that would be news.

Will we ever see that day when we as a culture do not stare slack-jawed and unblinking—so as not to miss a single thing—at all things gay?

There’s an old joke about how many lesbians it takes to screw in a light bulb. Five. One to screw it in and four to write about it. That’s pretty much where we are now and there’s no relief in sight. A society of 300,000,000 force-fed the nanosecond by nanosecond trials, tribulations, triumphs and television kisses of a comparatively scant few.

We are running out of “first woman this” and “first woman that” but we’ve only just started with the “first gay this, that and the other.”So, there will be decades of reading about the “first trans this and that.”And since there are 58 genders and counting presumably we will have the first gender-questioning county supervisor” and the “first cisgender-female mayor in a city with a population of 1 million at or near a major body of water.” I know I can’t wait.

A writer at something called “Letters to Christopher” explores a variant of this enforced obsession and that is the insistent obsession of “gay Christians”on, well, themselves, how we see them and deal with them and speak to them and minister to them and everything about them.

In “My Cross Isn’t Greater Than Yours, or, Enough with the Whining” this anonymous blogger says, “Show me a man who doesn’t suffer, and I’ll show you a dead man. One of the more irksome aspects in the current conversation of LGBT issues and Christianity is the remarkable amount of dreary and droopy writing I hear from folks like me who grew up in the Church and realized they had an attraction to men.” He calls it the “we’re gay and Christian and you should listen to us about how to minister to us blogosphere.”

He quotes one such blogger:

“It would be beneficial for Christians and Christian traditions as a whole to consider [the] question: are we imposing sexual abstinence as an unfunded mandate with dire consequences for LGBT people who do not succeed? Especially as more people are coming to awareness of their sexual orientations and gender identities at a younger age (emphasis mine), it is irresponsible and cruel for churches to repeat ‘You can’t have sex!’and refuse to offer any additional support.”He says there are only two options, forced abstinence and a life of suffering, or sex and excommunication from Church, and family. He says “numerous young LGBT Christians find themselves crushed by the pressure from priests, pastors, parents and faith communities.”

“Letters from Christopher” hates “that sort of portrayal of what my life must have been like back when I was a teenager in the eighties, or how that must be what the life is today for a 15 year old. How fatalistic. How could that ever inspire a teenager to fight the good fight of chastity if they were to ever read that?”

He says, “Sure, it’s hard. But we are made of the stuff of God. We are made in the image of a God who willingly went to the Cross. That’s the building block of our humanity. Boys and girls with same sex attraction aren’t witless victims of the vagaries of fate if they find themselves attracted to the same sex—they have a choice, and God has promised that He will always provide his children the grace to live out the most difficult of demands.”

One word describes this column from this anonymous blogger—manly—something quite distinct from the “oh woe is me” school of “gay Christians.” He calls them back to the “buck up” school. Get on with it. Stop whining, he says.

There are plenty of folks who have complaints about feeling isolated in the Church. The typical Catholic Church is not exactly a warm and welcoming place. If a greeter ever appeared at a Catholic parish, he might get slugged. Many can barely manage the sign of peace. Father George Rutler talks about how the Church allows for anonymity, that you can walk in, walk around, check things out, look at the statues, and no one bothers you.

And don’t we all know lots of single people struggling with the fact they have not found a mate, are basically alone and probably will be for life? Twenty turns to thirty turns to forty and beyond and they have to come to the same conclusions those with same-sex attraction have to come to: no sexual expression, perhaps no affection.

The same-sex attracted say the Church doesn’t do enough for them, does not recognize them, does not help them. And, let’s face it the teaching is rather paltry. But it is hard to believe the Church will conclude anything other than what it has already concluded; that the attraction is disordered and the act is intrinsically disordered and, well, evil.

So, what are they to do?

I think of a woman I will not name. She spent years as a chastity educator. She is beautiful and funny and never married. She is full of life, and humor, family and friends. She is not moping her life away, disgruntled, and as far as I can tell not boring folks with her unmarried plight.

I am quite sure this is not the life she envisioned. She no doubt envisioned marriage and children, probably lots of them. But that’s not what she’s been dealt. She has gotten on with a life rich in service to others. She bears their burdens and does not force her burden on others. And she knows this. Chastity is not a consolation prize.

Letters to Christopher says, “I don’t really care very much to hear about what the celibate ‘gay’ Christians have to say to me, or to the Church about how the Church should minister to people like us. Sometimes the sheep can help point out their needs to the shepherds in their care, but rarely. Most writing on the subject of same sex attraction and Christianity today seems to be the sheep shouting to the shepherds: ‘you’re idiots when it comes to this flock. Oh, and we’re the ones who can point your shepherds crooks in the right direction.’ ”

He’d rather assume your cross is heavier than his and offer to help you shoulder it.

Only one word for this guy. Manly. May his tribe increase.

Editor’s note: The image above titled “Christ Carrying the Cross” was painted by Titian in 1565.

I can face discrimination from both sides, but the church and the LGBT+ community have more in common than they think

This article has won the 2019 Hugo Young Award, which champions political opinion writing among UK postgraduate journalism students

‘Most LGBT+ Christians have unpleasant stories to tell, if not worse. So why do we bother going back to these places and people that have hurt us?’ Photograph: Desmond Boylan/AP

‘Most LGBT+ Christians have unpleasant stories to tell, if not worse. So why do we bother going back to these places and people that have hurt us?’ Photograph: Desmond Boylan/AP

Last modified on Thu 30 Jul 2020 10.54 BST

I was at a comedy show in Soho recently, when my slightly too loud cackle attracted attention from the comedian. One thing led to another, and I ended up being teased affably about my love life as the audience laughed on.

Once my excitement about having spoken to one of my favourite comedians – Mae Martin, if you’re curious – had died down, I realised something pretty significant had happened. I had said, “I have a girlfriend” in front of a room full of people without even thinking about it.

Granted, that doesn’t really sound like a stop-the-press moment. Mae Martin is a queer performer, after all. And in theory, I’m a strong, independent lesbian who doesn’t care what anyone thinks. But any gay person who has experienced that niggle of anxiety before announcing their queerness will understand.

A lowlight was confiding in a pastor when I was 18. He politely informed me my feelings were from the devil

I came out almost five years ago, and the majority of people I interact with couldn’t care less about the gender of the person I’m dating. My family and friends adore my girlfriend, and I no longer have personal qualms about my sexual identity. Yet even when I’m 90% sure the person I’m addressing will be accepting, I still get that little jerky stomach-knot right before I say the words “gay” or “girlfriend” to someone new.

Growing up in the church has played quite a big part in these insecurities. The ultimate lowlight was confiding in a pastor about my sexuality when I was 18. He politely informed me that my feelings were from the devil, and went on to share our conversation – which I had believed to be confidential – with the church the following Sunday as part of his sermon on “sexual immorality”.

There was also the church member who arranged to meet me for coffee in order to say I needed to repent; and the friend who bought me a book on “conversion therapy” for Christmas. I could go on.

Most LGBT+ Christians I’ve come across have similar stories to tell, if not worse. So why do we bother going back to these places and people that have hurt us? The simple answer is that I still believe in a loving God, and I still have faith that views will change, and things will get better.

I don’t necessarily expect non-Christians to understand that. Plenty of queer people have been hurt by the church. “Go to hell” placards at Pride parades, “conversion therapy” and politicians such as Tim Farron haven’t exactly given Christians a good reputation among the queer community. During my undergraduate degree, I basically gave up going to church altogether because it felt like all the Christian students were hardened anti-gay evangelicals.

There’s a time and a place for what I call “activist church-going”: going to a church where you know you won’t be accepted just to remind them that queer Christians do exist. I can work up the stamina to do this from time to time, but it can be incredibly draining to constantly place yourself in an environment where you’re not really welcome.

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Justin Lee was raised in a conservative Southern Baptist home. He had two loving parents, and was deeply committed to his faith. In school, classmates even referred to him as “God Boy” because of his devotion.

But, as he was entering high school, Lee’s whole world began to change, as he came face-to-face with feelings that he’d tried for many years to suppress.

“I didn’t know I was gay at first, because I was the kid who was preaching against folks accepting themselves as gay,” he tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered.

Lee formed the Gay Christian Network in 2001 to try and help other gay Christian kids and their families talk to one another, as well as with their respective churches. His new book is called Torn: Rescuing the Gospel from the Gays Vs. Christians Debate.

Interview Highlights

On coming out

“I absolutely believed it was a sinful choice to be gay. But I knew that I was attracted to guys and I kept thinking that was a phase I would grow out of. And as the years went by and I wasn’t growing out of this phase, I got to the point that I was just crying myself to sleep, night after night, begging God, ‘Please don’t let me feel this anymore.’ When I turned to the Christians I most respected in my life — my parents and my friends and my pastors — I found that they didn’t have a lot of answers for me, other than just don’t be gay. And I thought, well, I could not act on my feelings. I could not talk about my feelings. But I can’t make myself straight. So that really sent me on this journey trying to figure out how do we address this as a church.”

On being ‘too gay’ or ‘too Christian’

“I talk to people still every day who are just living in that constant feeling of being alone, and it’s very depressing when you feel like nobody understands you. You feel like you’ve been caught up in the midst of this culture war between the gay folks on one side and the Christians on the other side. And here you are, a gay Christian, and there’s no place for you.”

On reconciling with family who disagree with your choices

“I hear from so many folks who are just desperate for a way to sit down and be a family with their family members who don’t agree with them on this, or hold their church together … and I tell folks it’s all about continuing to express your love for each other and continuing to share stories.”

On his relationship with his parents since coming out

“I love my parents dearly and we have a wonderful relationship. And through the whole process they have been nothing but loving. We’ve disagreed; sometimes quite strongly. We’ve had a number of arguments over the years, and ultimately my position has changed on some things, and their positions have changed on some things. What I can say above all else is that I know that they love me and that they’re proud of me, and even when we disagree we do that in a way that’s loving and respectful of one another.”

How to be an openly gay christian

We’re Here. We’re Queer. We’re Fab.

How to be an openly gay christianThere never seems to be a shortage of right-wing Christian extremists spewing out vitriolic nonsense, but Pastor Logan Robertson (pictured left above) has risen to the top of the flock this week by tripling down on hate.

The story starts with Jim Marjoram (pictured right above), a self-proclaimed gay Christian who has written a book about his experience in the church and his faith. He sent an email out to around 400 churches about his project, and received a reply he could hardly believe.

Pastor Robertson of the Westcity Bible Baptist Church wrote: “We are not interested in your filthy lifestyle or book,” adding, “I pray that you will commit suicide, you filthy child molesting fag.”

Jim contacted the media with the outrageous email, and New Zealand’s ONE News took the story. Openly gay reporter Matt McLean called Pastor Robertson to request an interview, and on the phone the pastor told Matt that he hoped he too would commit suicide, and that he doesn’t give interviews to “filthy faggots.”

The Pastor did grant a straight journalist an interview, however, and said: “I think every single one of them should be put to death. Christians shouldn’t be doing it, I’m not going to do it, it’s the Government’s job to be doing it.”

Jim told ONE News he isn’t angry with the pastor, but he does hope people realize that what Logan is preaching “isn’t love.” He also wanted to give a special thanks to the homophobic pastor for helping him promote his book.