How to bathe a schnauzer

Grooming Airedale Terriers

Keeping your schnauzer clean not only improves his appearance, but helps prevent odor and remove potentially harmful bacteria. Bathing your schnauzer is like bathing almost any other pet, except he has a cute little beard that you must also wash and tend to.

Step 1

Wet your schnauzer with a cup or sprayer connected to the faucet. Use lukewarm water and make sure you never get water or shampoo in your pup’s eyes or ears.

Step 2

Dilute the shampoo of your choice with water. Generally, one part shampoo to three parts water is recommended. Schnauzers benefit from natural shampoos that do not strip the natural oils.

Step 3

Lather the shampoo over your four-legged friend, starting at the top of his head and working down his back towards his tail. Gently rub his skin and coat. Don’t use your finger nails or scrub him. It may cause discomfort and wash away his natural oils, making his skin dry. Also, rapid scrubbing may cause tangles in a schnauzer’s long coat.

Step 4

Scrub his signature beard, legs, chest and between his toes with shampoo. Dirt and debris in a schnauzer’s beard may cause an odor, so make sure you get all of the debris out.

Step 5

Rinse your furry friend with clean, fresh water from the tap. Start at the top of his head and work backwards. To rinse his beard, keep the water away from his face and pointed down toward his beard.

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Can i bathe my puppy every 2 weeks?

At a minimum, it’s advised to bathe your dog at least once every three months.

You can wash your dog as frequently as every other week (with gentle shampoo, it could be even more frequent).

When in doubt, use your judgment — if your dog starts to smell, it’s probably time for a bath.

How often can i clip my dog’s nails?

On average, most dogs will need to have their nails trimmed every 1-2 months.

You can also tell that your dog’s nails need to be trimmed if they are clicking on the floor when your dog walks.

How often do dogs need to be let out?

Typically, smaller breeds and younger dogs will need to urinate more frequently than larger breeds and older dog.

The average healthy dog will produce approximately 10 to 20 ml of urine for each pound of body weight per day.

Ideally adult dogs should be allowed outside to relieve themselves at least 3-5 times a day.

How often can i worm my dog?

Puppies should be wormed from two-three weeks of age at two weekly intervals until they are twelve weeks of age, then every month until they are six months of age.

Worming should continue at least three times a year with a recommended veterinary preparation for the rest of the dog’s life.

How often do dogs get shots?

States regulate the age at which it is first administered.

A second vaccination is recommended after 1 year, then boosters every 3 years.

Puppies need a booster 1 year after completing their initial series, then all dogs need a booster every 3 years or more often. Core dog vaccine.

Can i bathe my chihuahua puppy?

A good rule of thumb is that you should bathe your dog once a month.

Of course, if he rolls around in the mud, you can bathe him more often.

Or if your puppy is prone to dry skin, you can wait longer between baths.

Just be sure to choose a puppy shampoo that is gentle on his skin!

How often can a dog be bred?

Most dogs come into heat twice per year, or about every six months, although the interval can vary between breeds and from dog to dog.

Small breed dogs may cycle three times per year, while giant breed dogs may only cycle once every 12 months.

Miniature, Toy, and Teacup Schnauzer Puppies

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  • How to Bathe Your Mini Schnauzer Puppy

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    Bathing Your Puppy

    Bathing Your Toy, Teacup or Miniature Schnauzer Puppy Between Groomings

    Your miniature schnauzer puppy should be free of matts and tangles, so get those out before the bath. If you don’t, the matts will become tighter and more difficult to remove. You should be brushing your puppy at least two to three times per week.

    Bathing more than once a week can strip the coat of its natural oils that keep it shiny.

    If you have a teacup or toy sized schnauzer, you can bathe in the kitchen sink and just use your sink sprayer. There is a product you can use, like a short leash attached to a suction cup. This is helpful and will protect your dog/puppy from jumping out and possibly getting hurt.

    Never, ever turn your back – not for one second – if you have your puppy/dog in the sink. Have your shampoo/conditioner, towel and all necessary items to get the job done before you start . A non slip matt is good to have to keep slipping from occurring.

    There are special shampoos for dark colored schnauzers – like Black, black/silver, Liver, etc. There are also products that whiten the lighter colored Schnauzers – like parti, white and Salt/Pepper colors. For puppies, I prefer the oatmeal shampoos.

    At this point, you will have already chosen the products you’ll need to bathe your miniature schnauzer puppy.

    IMPORTANT NOTE – If you are using a topical flea product monthly, avoid dips or flea shampoos.

    You will want to place cotton balls in your dogs ears, to keep water from going down in the ear canal.

    To bathe your miniature schnauzer puppy, start at the head and soak the dog’s coat with warm water, not hot or cold, moving toward the tail. You will need a lot of water pressure to get down to the skin and thoroughly wet the coat, especially with supercoated schnauzer puppies .

    Once thoroughly soaked, start at the head with shampoo. Work up in a good lather, being certain to avoid ears and eyes.

    If your schnauzer puppy/dog has fleas, they will migrate to the head region once the coat is wet, so start at the head and work your way back to the puppies back and tail. Follow the directions on the bottle and add a little water if needed to work up a good lather. Flea medications will have to stay on longer, so again, follow what the product directions tell you to do.

    Once you’ve worked the lather all the way to the tails and back legs, starting at the head again , thoroughly rinse until no more shampoo washes out and the water runs clear. If you leave the shampoo in the coat, it will cause dullness and skin irritation. So it is important that you rinse thoroughly!

    When the shampoo is out of your dogs coat, take the cotton balls out of the ears and towel dry your puppies coat.

    Now you will need to blow dry your puppy’s coat. Be sure that the dryer is not too hot or too close to your puppy’s skin. Your Schnauzer puppy will most likely be used to the dryer already, from having previous groomings/baths.

    Now you can brush/comb through the coat once more and apply some doggie cologne.

    Most schnauzer puppies are just fine taking a bath and are usually exceptionally happy afterward. They feel good and they know that they are most beautiful puppy in the world.

    every 6 weeks

    Can i bathe my puppy every 2 weeks?

    At a minimum, it’s advised to bathe your dog at least once every three months.

    You can wash your dog as frequently as every other week (with gentle shampoo, it could be even more frequent).

    When in doubt, use your judgment — if your dog starts to smell, it’s probably time for a bath.

    How often can i clip my dog’s nails?

    On average, most dogs will need to have their nails trimmed every 1-2 months.

    You can also tell that your dog’s nails need to be trimmed if they are clicking on the floor when your dog walks.

    How often do dogs need to be let out?

    Typically, smaller breeds and younger dogs will need to urinate more frequently than larger breeds and older dog.

    The average healthy dog will produce approximately 10 to 20 ml of urine for each pound of body weight per day.

    Ideally adult dogs should be allowed outside to relieve themselves at least 3-5 times a day.

    How often can i worm my dog?

    Puppies should be wormed from two-three weeks of age at two weekly intervals until they are twelve weeks of age, then every month until they are six months of age.

    Worming should continue at least three times a year with a recommended veterinary preparation for the rest of the dog’s life.

    How often do dogs get shots?

    States regulate the age at which it is first administered.

    A second vaccination is recommended after 1 year, then boosters every 3 years.

    Puppies need a booster 1 year after completing their initial series, then all dogs need a booster every 3 years or more often. Core dog vaccine.

    Can i bathe my chihuahua puppy?

    A good rule of thumb is that you should bathe your dog once a month.

    Of course, if he rolls around in the mud, you can bathe him more often.

    Or if your puppy is prone to dry skin, you can wait longer between baths.

    Just be sure to choose a puppy shampoo that is gentle on his skin!

    How often can a dog be bred?

    Most dogs come into heat twice per year, or about every six months, although the interval can vary between breeds and from dog to dog.

    Small breed dogs may cycle three times per year, while giant breed dogs may only cycle once every 12 months.

    Can i bathe my puppy every 2 weeks?

    At a minimum, it’s advised to bathe your dog at least once every three months.

    You can wash your dog as frequently as every other week (with gentle shampoo, it could be even more frequent).

    When in doubt, use your judgment — if your dog starts to smell, it’s probably time for a bath.

    How late should i feed my puppy?

    By around eight weeks of age your puppy should be eating solid food.

    Puppies should be fed three to four times a day therefore if you are currently feeding ¾ a cup of puppy food twice a day you should consider spacing it out by feeding ½ cup three times a day.

    How far should a puppy walk?

    A good rule of thumb is a ratio of five minutes exercise per month of age (up to twice a day) until the puppy is fully grown, i.e.

    15 minutes (up to twice a day) when three months old, 20 minutes when four months old etc.

    Once they are fully grown, they can go out for much longer.

    How many times a day should a dog pee?

    Typically, smaller breeds and younger dogs will need to urinate more frequently than larger breeds and older dog.

    The average healthy dog will produce approximately 10 to 20 ml of urine for each pound of body weight per day.

    Ideally adult dogs should be allowed outside to relieve themselves at least 3-5 times a day.

    How many times should puppies be wormed?

    Puppies should be wormed from two-three weeks of age at two weekly intervals until they are twelve weeks of age, then every month until they are six months of age.

    Worming should continue at least three times a year with a recommended veterinary preparation for the rest of the dog’s life.

    How often can i clip my dog’s nails?

    On average, most dogs will need to have their nails trimmed every 1-2 months.

    You can also tell that your dog’s nails need to be trimmed if they are clicking on the floor when your dog walks.

    How long should it take my dog to eat?

    Most experts recommend feeding your dog twice a day — once in the morning and once in the evening — though puppies under five months of age should be fed three to four times a day, or as directed by your veterinarian.

    Does your Miniature Schnauzer like taking a dog bath? If so you’re one of the lucky ones but.

    “Anybody who doesn’t know what soap tastes like.
    never washed a dog.”

    Franklin P. Jones

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    If you spend half a day chasing your Schnauzer around the house to just get him in the tub, this article on how to bathe a dog is for you. By following these simple steps, giving your dog a bath will no longer be a chore but instead an enjoyable bonding experience between you and your Miniature Schnauzer.

    First you will need to decide on where to bathe your dog. If your Miniature Schnauzer is still a puppy, using the kitchen sink is probably the easiest place to bathe him. Once your Schnauzer gets to be bigger, bathing him in a tub or basin will probably be the best choice.

    Dog Bath Supplies to Have on Hand

    Now let’s gather together all the supplies we will need:

    Bathing a Dog Step by Step

    1. Prep Your Dog: Before you bathe your Schnauzer, brush your dog out thoroughly to remove any mats or tangles. If you don’t, they will only get worse once they are wet. Next, take a drop of mineral oil onto your index finger and dab a bit at the inner and outer corners of your Schnauzer’s eyes. This will help repel the soapy water from this area during his dog bath. If you like, place large cotton balls into your Schnauzer’s ears to help keep water from entering the ear canal. Now your Schnauzer is ready for the tub.
    2. Dog Bath Tip: One of the biggest mistakes people make when bathing their dogs is not having the water at a good temperature. Making this mistake will have your Schnauzer hating dog baths even more. Get the water warm enough to actually apply onto your Schnauzer. Be sure it’s not too hot or too cold by testing it on yourself first.
    3. Get Tub & Water Ready: Place the no slip bath mat in the tub. This will help keep your Schnauzer from slipping around and therefore making him feel more secure. If you will be using a pitcher, you will want to fill the tub up with about 5 inches of warm water first. If you will be using a water sprayer this is not necessary.
    4. Wash the Body: Now place your Schnauzer in the tub and pour or spray warm water all over your Schnauzer’s entire body, except for his face. Going totally against the norm, I prefer to leave the head dry. Most dogs hate to have their faces wet, so saving this area for last makes bath time a breeze.

    Once your Schnauzer’s body is wet apply a bit of dog shampoo into the palm of your hands and rub them together to warm it up a bit. Then apply it to your Schnauzer’s back. It’s probably better for your dog if you use a natural dog shampoo which will be more gentle on your Schnauzer’s coat.

    Now, using your hands, washcloth, or sponge distribute the soap all over your Schnauzer’s upper body and underbelly. I use a soft bristle brush to clean the legs and paws and in between the pads.

    Dog Bath Tip: During the entire process, be sure to praise your Miniature Schnauzer on how good he is being, using a soft sweet tone in your voice.

  • Rinse the Body: Now rinse your Schnauzer thoroughly. note: if you are using a pitcher and have a tub full of dirty soapy water, be sure to drain it first before rinsing your Schnauzer. If you are going to be using a dog conditioner now is the time to do so.
  • Wash the Face: During this first rinse, go ahead and get your Schnauzer’s head wet, too. Now, using a tearless shampoo, soap up a sponge or washcloth and gently stroke over your Schnauzer’s head, being careful to avoid the eyes. Rinse him thoroughly one more time from head to tail. You’ll want to be sure all the soap is off so it doesn’t irritate or dry out his skin. And if need be, you can try these at-home remedies for help in tackling those stubborn dog tear stains.
  • Rinse Thoroughly: When you are finished rinsing your Schnauzer, remove the cotton balls from his ears and let your Schnauzer give himself a good shake-off. Gently squeeze any excess water from his legs and wrap a good towel to soak up most of the remaining water from his body.
  • Dry Your Dog: You may use a blow dryer on cool or on the lowest setting possible to completely finish drying your Miniature Schnauzer. Once your Miniature Schnauzer is completely dry, offer him a really good treat and maybe even take him for a little stroll and show him off!
  • A Dog Bath to De-Skunk Your Dog

    So, your Miniature Schnauzer got a little too close to a skunk and now. Pee-yew. There’s no denying the smell of SKUNK! Woof! You need to get him clean and FAST! Forget using tomato juice. Use this de-skunk dog bath recipe instead before your precious pooch stinks up the whole house!

    The very first thing to do if your Schnauzer comes inside smelling like skunk is to get him back outside ASAP! He will surly want to get the smell off himself and in doing so roll around your carpet or rub himself all over your furniture. So keep him outside!

    Next prepare this de-skunk solution by combining the following ingredients into a plastic bottle or pitcher:

    De-Skunk Solution for Dogs

    • 2 cups of Hydrogen Peroxide (1 bottle)
    • 1/cup of Baking Soda
    • 1 teaspoon of Dawn dish soap

    Now, if you must bring your schnauzer inside to bathe him, put on a pair of rubber gloves and get a large bath towel to wrap around your dog, before picking him up and bringing him in. Take him directly to the the tub and shut the doors to prevent an escape. (note: IF weather permits, it’s always best to bathe your dog outside during a deskunking bath).

    Okay, now apply the soap mixture and begin dog washing. Be careful not to get any of the solution in areas that could cause harm or irritation like the eyes, nose, and mouth. Also be sure to avoid any open wounds as well.

    Use the entire soap mixture and continue washing your dog thoroughly all over for no less than 10 minutes. Now rinse your dog thoroughly and get a fresh towel to dry him off. Be sure to throw away the gloves and any other towels or items previously used away. This inexpensive solution works great for those curious pups that always seem to find themselves in a stinky situation.

    The Miniature Schnauzer grooming chart below shows the basic steps for grooming your Miniature Schnauzer pet. I want to emphasize the word pet because, although the cut may appear to be show quality, it is not.

    *** Show quality Schnauzers require hand stripping of the coat.

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    Click on the image above if you would like to download The Miniature Schnauzer Grooming Chart, by Schnauzers-Rule.com to use as a handy reference.

    How to Groom Your Mini Schnauzer

    1. Start by brushing your Miniature Schnauzer out thoroughly. You will want to make sure your dog is free of mats and tangles before beginning to clip or cut the hair.
    2. Using #8 or #10 blade begin moving clippers downward from the base of the skull to the tail.
    3. Follow the pattern in the diagram above, clipping downward on either sides of your Schnauzer’s body to just about an inch above the hocks.
    4. When clipping the top of the skull, cheeks, and throat, gently move the clippers against the grain being careful not to apply to much pressure.
    5. Continue clipping downward on the chest area stopping just at the shoulder blades.
    6. Using scissors, shape legs, underbody furnishings, and tail, as above.
    7. When trimming the Schnauzer eyebrows and shaping the beard, face your dog and comb hair forward. Cut a straight line to the outer corner of the eye. Don’t remove too much of the beard but do trim it up a bit also.
    8. Don’t forget to pluck out the excess ear hair (See Dog Ear Cleaning)
    9. And also Trim up those nails! (See Cutting Your Dog’s Nails)
    10. Follow our complete Miniature Schnauzer Grooming Series and you will learn how to groom your Miniature Schnauzer at home for those in between dog grooming visits or all the time!

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    Schnauzer Grooming Tips

    Here are just a few more points to keep in mind when grooming your Schnauzer:

    There was a lot to figure out about bathing once Fig grew too large for the kitchen sink. I can’t seem to get things perfect, so that Fig loves bathing, we are near perfect now. Bathing Fig is crucial at home because I have allergies. Most people with dog allergies are reacting to dog saliva that is dried on fur from licking or wrestling. After Fig plays with other dogs, he must be rinsed when brought indoors for my health. Today have bathed him in so many setups that I am probably a dog-bathing expert.

    HANDHELD SHOWER ARM

    The easiest way to get Fig done quickly and painlessly is with a handheld showerhead. I can wet him down, pause the water (which calms him unless he is cold), soap him, and then rinse all sides quickly. I use water that is the same temperature and pressure that I use personally when bathing. When I used lukewarm water, he shivers if the water is not actively running on him when he is wet. As a general rule, when I am wearing a sweater in the house I drag in a portable heater and preheat the bathroom, so he is not freezing when he is standing wet in the tub. Before I added the extra heater Fig was like a shaking leaf. Bathing was always a pitiful event. Now he tolerates bath time with mild displeasure. This is a major improvement.

    BATH

    I gave him a bath in a filled bathtub once, but Fig is on the tall side (14.5” tall) and the amount water required to get it deep enough is ridiculous. Far too water wasteful. Completely stupid idea. I guess you could reuse your own bathwater for a dog, but it will probably have soap in it that would make your dog itch.

    The second time I tried a deep Rubbermaid plastic tub filled with water in the tub, but the water was so heavy that the Rubbermaid container was not able to hold a lid afterwards due to permanent stretching under heavy water weight.

    Ultimately, I didn’t get enough soap out of his fur using bathwater. With my allergies, I easily noticed the difference in cleanliness. He still made me sneeze after an hour in the same room. I figure salvia allergens were evenly redistributed on his body and not rinsed entirely. When Fig is really clean, I have zero allergic response.

    On the upside, I definitely got more mud out of his feet and it was supper easy to free up clumps. I reserve the bucket method for flea shampooing only now. Mid-flea-season, even with his top spot flea treatment, Fig picked up too many adult fleas on an outing that were not dead and I didn’t want then hopping off in the house. The bucket method and flea shampoo (water down shampoo and put on dry, let dog stand 5 minute with soap on then rinse in bucket) works when you want to get all the adults off and dead in under 15 minutes.

    SHOWER

    I have also washed him under a normal running shower. I had to turn the water on high to get enough pressure for a rinse. I get rinsed myself in the process. When I use this method I plan to take a shower myself after washing him. I don’t wear much clothing and don’t worry about getting wet. Unfortunately Fig now panics if you take your pants off in front of him. We joke about dropping our pants at a party to get a rise out of friends. You can pull them up and he comes running back to you, drop them again and he bolts…it’s sickly hilarious.

    SPIGOT

    I used a running bathtub spout and nearly drowned Fig by shoving his head under the running water. Fig took in a nose full and choked because he struggled and looked up into the rushing water. It was traumatic and he tried to flee for his life the next few times.

    Why did I put his head under heavy gushing water? Because when shampoo is not completely rinsed, Fig itches uncontrollably once dried. This forces me to rinse him a 2nd and sometimes 3rd time. Heavy water pressure rinses soap completely in a couple seconds, while water from a cup or wet rag does not do the job as well. When you don’t get soap out completely, it is easy to confuse simple soap irritation with seasonal skin or food allergies.

    Today I can easily rinse Fig with a running spout holding his head down by the nose, I don’t get his underside soap-free easily, so I just give him a rinse with warm water this way. If soap is required, I only do his shoulders and back (where he is covered in dog saliva from wrestling). Fig has a hard time standing under the spigot because of the curved walls of the tub. WARNING: Dogs can scratch enamel and plastic coatings on tubs, so be forewarned. If they are slipping in a tub get a mat for them to stand on. Towels don’t stay put.

    A spigot is the #1 method in some situations. We have a shower stall with a foot spigot higher than the tub’s. Fig can stand straight and tall. He doesn’t have to curl around the the bathtub walls, fearful of slipping. This setup is my husband’s favorite because of the sheer speed. Water pours like a high pressure wash and you can get a miniature schnauzer washed in 1 minute: 3 seconds soaking Fig tail to head, water turned off, 30 seconds soaping and scrubbing from tail to head, 10 seconds rinsing from head to tail, water turned off, 5 seconds squeezing body to drain water, 2 second towel dry, WALA! You have to get in the shower stall and close the doors to use this method, so plan to shower yourself afterwards, because you will be truly soaked from the back splash.

    OUTDOOR HOSE

    It’s too cold for washing a little dog outside most of the year where I live. This is not true for large dogs. This is a surface area to body weight issue. Small dogs are like hummingbirds and they struggle to maintain internal body temperature when hit with cold water. With a longhaired dog (we keep him fuzzier than typical mini schnauzers) washing him outside is harder because if he escapes he dashes for grass and rolls. Untangling grass and seeds from wet longhaired legs is really hard. We can bring him inside to towel off and dry indoors, but the hassle of holding him in place with a leash while hosing is not worth it. The bathtub or shower stall holds him like a pen for the first bit of toweling off. Mini Schnauzers don’t really shed so it is easy enough to clean up a bathroom afterwards.

    CONCLUSION

    Fig is always a crazy happy dog afterwards – even when traumatized in the process. We love to let him run off this energy. Fig excitedly looks forward to Towel Time (swaddled like a baby to dry his longhaired legs and running like a wild bull into a dry towel repeatedly to get his back and head dry.

    So, if you are not a master bather yet – no worries, just work on doing things quickly and you will be fine. Your dog will love you again instantly once it is over.