How to avoid losing socks in the washing machine

How to avoid losing socks in the washing machine

Let’s get one thing clear: the best compression socks will help with many areas but they are not an athletic miracle.

Many people think these socks enhance stamina and endurance, helping you to run longer and push harder. Not so. Compression socks are intended to improve circulation, relieve fatigue, and prevent swelling in the legs.

The good news is:

The best compression socks for men can increase your anaerobic threshold, speed up lactic acid elimination, and promote muscle efficiency.

So why use compression socks?

If you’re a nurse on your feet all day, a cop who walks for hours, or you just spend a lot of time standing, compression socks can prevent blood pooling in your feet. They’re also recommended for varicose veins, pregnant mothers, deep vein thrombosis, and long-distance air travel.

Are they a good addition to your workout gear? They could be, but don’t expect miracles just by putting on a pair of socks.

Below, you’ll find our list of the best compression socks for you to wear whether you’re a nurse, athlete, or traveler. Each sock has its own pros and cons, so give them a read to find out which sock is right for you.

Our editors independently research, test, and recommend the best products; you can learn more about our review process here. We may receive commissions on purchases made from our chosen links.

Wintertime calls for a change in skincare to battle the cold, here are 10 ways to give your skin some extra TLC to avoid dryness and irritation.

When winter hits, your skin takes a toll. The cold and dry temperatures suck the hydration out of you, which is ironic considering that summertime is also dehydration season, there is no escape!

Now that winter has arrived, get ready for cold weather skincare and dryness prevention. If you are already experiencing the signs of dry winter skin, it isn’t too late but staying on top of your skin before it shows signs of dryness will make it easier to maintain.

Signs of dry skin include: redness, flakiness, scaly skin, irritation, burning sensations and rough patches.

Here are 10 tips for preventing dry skin in the winter and keeping your skin healthy all year long.

9 Moisturize After Washing Your

The biggest lie that the lotion industry tells you is that you can add moisture to your skin: sorry, lotions and creams trap moisture but they don’t rehydrate your skin. Hydrating your skin comes from within, by drinking lots of water year-round!

The best way to trap moisture is by moisturizing right after showering. Use a towel to dab your body dry (not wipe) leaving a little bit of water residue on the skin so the moisturizer will trap it.

The same goes for your hands! A big problem area in the winter, carry a hand cream in your purse to use after washing your hands throughout the day.

8 Keep Using Sunscreen

Suns out, UV rays are out too! No matter where you live, UV rays are a part of the daily environment. Keep using sunscreen, especially on your face, to prevent signs of early-onset aging and UV damage.

Plus, UV rays suck out the moisture in your skin, which you are trying to prolong throughout the day to prevent dryness during your busy schedule.

How to avoid losing socks in the washing machine

Here at American Golf we dedicate an entire section for a widespread collection of headwear available in all gender options of Male, Female, Junior and Unisex. Headwear can arguably act as one of the most important accessories to a player when on the golf course. Depending on the type of hat, cap or visors, these headwear accessories can prevent the glaring sun from hindering your vision, keep your head shielded from possibly getting sunstroke and also keep you cool in the colder weathers. Our impressive headwear lineup features accessories from some of the leading golf brands such as Titleist, adidas Golf, Under Armour, Ping, Benross, Calvin Klein, Cobra Golf, Ellesse, FootJoy, Galvin Green, GOLFINO, Lacoste, Oscar Jacobson, PUMA Golf and Röhnisch.

Colour – Our vast collection of hats, caps & visors are provided in various colours to complete a player’s stylish golfing outfit. We therefore provide head accessories in colours such as Black, Blue, Green, Grey, Davy, Red and White.

Size – Depending on the model, our hats, caps & visors are either provided in a one size fit or separated into Small / Medium, Medium / Large and Large / X Large. While most of the headwear accessories operate a one size fits all, this is becoming an increasingly popular sizing method because the adjustable fastener situated at the back of the piece of headwear will fit any golfer perfectly, no matter what size their head is.

Hats – Most golf hats are in the form of a beanie style design which is ultimately to provide warmth and wind protection. The beanie hat style normally includes a cotton exterior and sometimes a fleeced lined inner shell to provide a golfer the comfort of keeping their head as warm and as shielded from the wind as possible. Other hats such as the bucket hat are designed for different weathers and are usually more suited in damp and wet conditions. The bucket hat features a wool/cloth design which naturally provides waterproof protection in the rain.

Caps – Golf caps are now the most preferred choice of headwear for all weathers as these are the most stylish and beneficial. This is down to the fact that the golf cap provides players with two essential benefits when playing in the better weather conditions. Any golf cap delivers foremost protection to a person’s eyes in front of the glaring sun. This also allows the golfer to be able to fully track their ball after their golf shot instead of losing it mid-flight because of the beaming sunlight. Caps also provide key protection to a player’s head and cover up any entrance for a golfer to gain sunstroke. Along with their highly fashionable element, the golf cap is therefore an indispensable accessory for any player.

Visors – Golf visors are of similar pedigree to the golf cap. Visors similarly provide crucial protection to a player’s eyes in the glaring sun, allowing their vision to not hinder and therefore provide them with the ability to fully track their golf ball after their shot. However, the visor differs slightly because it’s top is open and doesn’t cover the top of a golfer’s head. It therefore enables the heat to escape and provides a cooler feel for a player’s upper head and hairline. This can be extremely beneficial on those hot summer days when it is necessary to provide eye and visual protection but at the courtesy of a more breathable approach. The coverless feature can also act in providing a more suited fit as it prevents a person’s hair from being restricted. This can be favourable to a golfer with longer hair as it therefore isn’t trapped within the headwear.

Golf Hats, Caps & Visors Frequently Asked Questions

How to wash golf caps

Your golf cap can naturally accumulate oil, sweat, and suncream from your skin, as you’re typically going to wear it on a bright or warm day. The sweat wicking fabric will be doing its job, however nobody likes to see that their golf hat has developed discolouration or sweat marks. Here are some tips on how to wash your golf cap.

First, check if the colour will transfer or run should you introduce it to water. This can happen with hats that have dark dye, like blue or black, and especially newer pieces as the fabric won’t be as ‘weathered’ as a well-worn hat. To test the colour, take a clean white cloth and dampen it a little before gently rubbing the fabric with it. If the hat’s colour transfers onto the cloth, then don’t submerge your hat in water when washing it. We’ll shortly cover how to remove stains from golf caps, so if you find the colour runs with this test then skip ahead.

If your colour doesn’t run, it’s safe to begin washing your golf hat. We wouldn’t recommend putting it through a washing cycle in your washing machine, as the high temperatures and the perfumed detergents could damage the fabric and stitching. Instead, hand wash your golf hat in a clean bowl or basin with a gentle soap.

Fill your bowl or basin with lukewarm water and a gentle fabric soap. Work the soap up into a lather so the water has bubbles and leave the hat to soak in it for an hour or so. Whilst it soaks, swirl and stir the water from time to time to keep it circulating through the fabric. With your thumb and forefinger, rub at the hat band to work away any sweat marks. When you’re happy with the outcome, take the hat out of the water and rinse it under clean water until the run-off is clear and free of bubbles. Then, pat it dry with a hand towel and leave it to dry in an open space.

How to remove sweat stains from golf caps

If the sweat marks didn’t come out of your hat when you were washing it using our detailed method above or you’re worried about the colour running, then you need these tips on how to remove sweat stains without submerging the hat.

To clean just the sweatband and without affecting the surrounding fabric, make a solution out of baking soda and vinegar. Take measurements of four tablespoons of baking soda and about 60ml of water (or one-quarter of a cup). Mix this into a paste in a bowl and apply it to the sweatband using a toothbrush or teaspoon. Using small circular motions, rub the paste into the area, then leave the hat to sit with the paste on the band. Don’t leave this for longer than an hour – we’d recommend checking a patch after 45 minutes to see whether it’s lifted enough for your liking.

Before the hour is up, spray the sweatband with white wine vinegar and scrub the band a few more times before rinsing it with cold water. You may want to either trickle the water from the tap or pour a little on from a cup to avoid the need to submerge it. Then, pat it dry and leave it to dry in an open, ventilated area. Follow this same method for the sweat band of golf visors, too.

Maximum PC is your reliable guide to building, optimizing, and getting the most from your PCs. We're here to help you, whether you've never built a system before, or if you're an old hand that has been building for years. Every issue is packed with easy to follow guides, in-depth reviews, and unique commentary from our panel of system building experts. Our goal is to tell you everything you need to know about PCs, system building, and the latest hardware releases, including the stuff you never thought you needed to know. All in a friendly package designed and written by PC users, for PC users. Subscriptions start from as little as $9 per year! You can subscribe to our print edition, our Android or iOS edition, or both for one great price! Read more about our subscription options here Buy the latest issue or a back issue here

Hard hitting concise reviews and kick ass recommendations

In every issue of Maximum PC we look at the latest hardware to give you the low-down on which components, systems, and software are actually worth dropping your cash on. Whether you're building from scratch, upgrading your own machine, or just looking for that perfect peripheral to complete you dream build, you'll find only the very best hardware gets the Maximum PC seal of approval. Backed up by our punishing benchmark suite, you can rely on our expertise.

How to avoid losing socks in the washing machine

In-depth system building and Windows 10 advice

Every issue we show you how to build PCs, with fully-costed component lists and insights on what to watch out for. We cover high-end system builds, where you'll want to turn to bespoke water-cooling solutions, through to budget rigs, and plenty in-between. We also show you how to get the most from Windows, with tweaking and optimization guides, along with showing you why sometimes you'll want to turn to Linux to get specific tasks done instead.

How to avoid losing socks in the washing machine

Easy to follow guides and original insight

Having an incredible PC is all well and good, but it's what you do with it that matters. We show you how to do more with your machine every issue, with simple tips and tricks to help with everyday tasks, and in-depth guides on doing something completely new with specific hardware and software. Whether that's setting up your own servers, putting a raspberry Pi to work or getting the most from the best apps.

Compression vests offer support to the abdomen and back, reduce muscle inflammation and can help boost blood circulation in the body.

Which compression vest is best?

Compression vests offer several benefits, including post-workout recovery, improved athletic performance and treatment of certain health conditions. They are designed to fit very close to the body, providing a stretchy feel and sleek appearance. Most of them feature lightweight and breathable fabric for comfort. If you are looking for outstanding fit and high-quality fabric, the Eleady Compression Vest is the top choice.

What to know before you buy a compression vest

Cold gear compression vests help keep the body cool during warm temperatures or while exercising. Hot gear compression vests increase the body temperature for maximum calorie burning or protection from cold. Both types are lightweight and made from moisture-wicking fabric. The cold gear vests might have a brushed interior or double layer of fabric for extra warmth. You can consider wearing compression socks or compression shorts along with the vests for maximum benefits.

Compression vests that are sized correctly should have a snug fit. They should not be too tight, otherwise they might restrict movement or blood circulation. They should not be too loose, otherwise you won’t get the benefits of the compression.

A good quality compression vest should apply even pressure throughout the entire garment. If the vest is excessively tight in one area, it is either not good quality or the wrong size for you. Keep in mind that most compression garments get slightly loose over time as they gradually lose their elasticity.

Material

Nylon, polyester, spandex and elastane are the most commonly used materials in compression vests. For thermal compression vests, you might also find neoprene in the fabric for extra warmth. If you want more elasticity, you should choose a vest with a higher percentage of spandex or elastane.

Some vests also have silicone to increase comfort. Silicone patches or dots also help provide a better fit and reduce slipping of the fabric. If you want a softer and more luxurious feel to the compression vest, look for garments that are made with cotton.

Design

Most compression vests are available in crew or V-neck designs. There are some variations that have a zippered front closure. The cold gear versions might feature a turtleneck for extra warmth.

What to look for in a quality compression vest

Durability

A high-quality compression vest offers the same supportive stretch after several months or years of use, provided you take care of the vest. It also does not easily lose its shape after washing or drying. Apart from the quality of the fabric, the stitching also plays a key role in the long-term durability of the compression vest.

Elasticity

Elasticity is important for the compression vest to be comfortable and to prevent the restriction of mobility. The pressure should be the same throughout the garment. High-quality spandex or elastane provides the best elasticity.

Moisture-wicking

Moisture-wicking fabric helps keep the sweat away from the body. It does this by moving sweat to the outer surface of the fabric to help quickly dry the moisture. This also helps keep the vest lightweight and comfortable.

How much you can expect to spend on a compression vest

You can expect to spend $15-$30 for a good quality compression vest. The high-end options can be more than $60.

Compression vest FAQ

How long does a compression vest last?

The elasticity of compression vests does weaken over time. The high-quality compression vests should last for a couple of years without losing too much elasticity. Regular washes or heavy-duty use can reduce the lifespan. If you have been prescribed a compression vest to wear for a medical condition or post-surgery, you might need to wear the vest for an extended time, which can significantly reduce its longevity.

What is the best way to clean a compression vest?

Most compression garments can be hand or machine-washed. If you are using a washer, it is best to use a gentle cycle and mild detergent, and you should avoid hot water. The extra heat might damage the elastic fibers of the vest. For drying, it is best to air dry them. Keep in mind that hanging a wet compression vest might over-stretch the garment. Use a drying rack or a dry towel to absorb the excess water before hanging.

What’s the best compression vest to buy?

Top compression vest

How to avoid losing socks in the washing machine

What you need to know: This lightweight compression vest is made from a strong weave of nylon and spandex for extra comfort and elasticity.

What you’ll love: This design helps make the body appear slimmer. The fabric is breathable, which helps with blood circulation and moisture-wicking. The compression is tight without restricting movement or circulation.

What you should consider: Some users have reported issues with this vest being too tight for the size they got.

Where to buy: Sold by Amazon

Top compression vest for the money

How to avoid losing socks in the washing machine

What you need to know: This thermal vest is made from neoprene to help increase body temperature and burn more calories during a workout.

What you’ll love: It has polyester in the fabric that helps offer a sleek appearance. The fabric is extremely lightweight to maximize mobility during a workout. It is extremely comfortable to wear underneath a shirt.

What you should consider: The compression is not very tight, so some users might find this vest lacking in lumbar and abdomen support.

Where to buy: Sold by Amazon

Worth checking out

How to avoid losing socks in the washing machine

What you need to know: This compression vest offers firm support for the back and abs without restricting circulation in the body.

What you’ll love: It is made from lightweight and highly elastic fiber to allow for a full range of motion. This vest feels firm on the outside while being comfortable to wear for an extended time.

What you should consider: Some users reported durability issues. The vest tends to easily lose its elasticity over time.

Where to buy: Sold by Amazon

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Ali Azhar writes for BestReviews. BestReviews has helped millions of consumers simplify their purchasing decisions, saving them time and money.

How to avoid losing socks in the washing machine

If you feel unwell when travelling by boat, you may be experiencing sea sickness. This form of travel sickness is similar to feeling unwell in a car, though sea travel is often more turbulent than on roads. Some people may find sea sickness tablets or bands can ease the symptoms when they travel by boat.

What is sea sickness?

Sea sickness often happens when you travel by boat, cruise ships or on other watercrafts. Motion sickness is caused by mixed messages to your brain, where your inner ear sends different signals to what your eyes see.

When you’re on a vessel which is moving up and down over water, you may experience feelings of nausea, sickness and vertigo. On larger cruise ships, the feeling of movement without your eyes seeing it may also make you feel unwell.

The symptoms of seasickness differ from person to person, but can include:

  • Pale skin
  • Loss of appetite
  • Dizziness
  • Increased saliva production
  • Nausea

How do sea sickness tablets work?

If you’re looking for relief when you travel by boat, sea sickness tablets may be recommended by your pharmacist. Over-the-counter medicines such as promethazine teoclate or cinnarizine are often suggested for those who feel nauseous when they travel.

Hyoscine is one of the common medicines for motion sickness and works by blocking the signals sent to your brain during motion that may cause confusion. It can also reduces saliva build up in the mouth (a symptom of nausea).

Antihistamines are also sometimes used to treat symptoms of seasickness. These are thought to work by blocking H1 receptors in the area of the brain responsible for nausea. Some sea sickness pills make people feel drowsy and interfere with other medications, so it’s important to talk to a helathcare professional before taking them. It’s also essential to get medical advice if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding.

Are there any other sea sickness remedies I could try?

Sea sickness bands are another option, which are a natural and drug-free choice. The bands have a small plastic stud which applies acupressure to the on the nei kuan P6 point between the two central tendons near your wrist. Most anti-sickness bands are suitable for pregnant women and children, so talk to a pharmacist to see if this option is best for you or your family.

Travel sickness patches are another available option, which can be prescribed by a GP. These patches are applied behind the ear and slowly release medication into your body to correct some of the chemical imbalances caused by motion sickness.

How to ease sea sickness symptoms

Although there isn’t a seasickness cure, there are a few ways to minimise the symptoms of sea sickness.

These include:

  • Sea sickness tablets or bands – sea sickness tablets should be taken 1-2 hours before a transport for optimum effect. They work by blocking the signal to the brain that causes nausea.
  • Ginger tea or tablets – ginger is known to soothe the stomach and help reduce bloating. It can be sipped as a fizzy drink or swallowed in tablet form, which some may find helpful in reducing motion sickness.
  • Keeping motion to a minimum by sitting in the centre of the boat – the side of the boat is where the most amount of swaying happens, so try to avoid being on the edge.
  • Closing your eyes and taking deep breaths – deep breaths can assist in feelings of calm, and breathing in fresh, cold air can help settle the dizziness often associated with seasickness.
  • Drinking water – sipping small amounts of water throughout the journey can help settle your stomach and prevent dehydration which may lead to unwanted headaches.

Why do people get seasick?

Seasickness occurs when repeated movements experienced on water send unusual signals to the balance sensors in your brain. Your sense of balance is operated by the vestibular system, a collection of nerves and fluids within your inner ear.

Your vestibular system and your eyes work together to send signals to your brain to let it know you’re in motion. Feelings of seasickness occur when your brain and inner ear are not in alignment, and your brain struggles to store this information correctly.

Who gets seasick?

It is not fully understood why some people experience symptoms of seasickness when others do not, although it may be connected to the different ways in which an individual’s vestibular system functions. Women, children and those who experience migraines are more likely to feel seasick than others. Certain medications can also contribute to increased motion sickness.

Those with more experience on boats may find themselves less likely to become seasick, although this is not always the case.

How do you prevent sea sickness?

We have listed some ways to help ease the symptoms of seasickness, but how can you prevent seasickness in the first place?

Prevent sea sickness by:

  • Not drinking alcohol or eating a large meal before your boat journey – whilst it is important to never skip a meal, be sure to avoid putting anything in your stomach that might lead to discomfort during turbulent weather.
  • If possible, stand by the helmsman (boat driver) – drivers are less likely to experience motion sickness as they are more in tune with the movements around them. Sitting near whoever is steering the boat can prevent the symptoms of seasickness before they begin.
  • Sleep – keeping your eyes closed for the duration of the journey is one of the best ways to reduce confusion between your brain signals. Listening to an audiobook with your eyes closed can also positively distract your brain.

How long does sea sickness last?

Symptoms of sea sickness usually go away soon after journey is over, though sometimes they can last a few hours after travelling. By following the instructions on your pharmacy recommend anti-sickness remedy, you can help avoid sea-sickness for the duration of your trip.

Can you get sea sick on a cruise ship?

Sea sickness can vary from person to person, and also depends on the weather conditions or sea you are travelling across. If you already know you experience travel sickness, it might be a good idea to prepare for your cruise.

"Kyle Dishman can’t afford to shop at the local grocery store anymore. Instead he goes to Dollar General, where he can make $40 stretch into a week’s worth of groceries and the occasional can of motor oil for his Chrysler 300."

EDIT: Of course not all things cost $1, but it's certainly weighted in that direction. You don't go to a dollar store for nice things; you do it because it's the only option for you. A lot of the responses seem to want to debate how poor people are making choices, and I think that misses the point.

Dollar stores very often aren’t cheaper than other sources for similar products especially for grocery items (which they tend to have very limited selections of.)

People that shop for groceries at dollar stores do it because:

1. They shop for other things at dollar stores (either for price, or for reason #2, or because its the only place close by that carries the type of thing involved) and getting groceries there saves a trip,

2. Reputation for price without actual comparison,

3. Lack of actual grocery stores conveniently located,

Your own second article notes the relatively high prices (as well as quality issues) of dollar store groceries.

Despite their limited ability, they ARE able to look at price tags in different stores and go "hey, wait a minute!"

If you're dollar store level poor, it's expensive and stressful, and you're constantly weighing spending money now versus keeping what little remains for whatever awful thing is going to leave you destitute. There's a fair amount of conflicting and complex psychology going on in that shopping decision beyond not just knowing that they should comparison shop.

I’ve been dirt poor; I’ve never been in a situation where “dollar store as regular grocery source” made sense (though I’ve shopped in dollar stores, and occasionally when I did found deals on grocery items that were worthwhile), and I am very much aware of why that was never the case for me and why it is and was sometimes for other people.

Also, not all people who shop at dollar stores are dirt poor.

> It may be tough to believe, but y'know what'd surprise literally none of the poors if you told them? That they pay more money for less product at the dollar store than elsewhere.

Actually, it would probably suprise some of them. Believe it or not, poorly informed poor people do exist. The idea that they don't is as misguided as the idea that all poor people are poorly informed.

> Despite their limited ability, they ARE able to look at price tags in different stores

Not really, when reason #3 (“Lack of actual grocery stores conveniently located”) applies. Comparison shopping takes time and effort that is something of a luxury in the best of cases, but it also takes having alternatives in the first place.

> If you're dollar store level poor, it's expensive and stressful, and you're constantly weighing spending money now versus keeping what little remains for whatever awful thing is going to leave you destitute.

That's true, but it doesn't contradict anything I said. It's like you have a canned rant about poor people that you arr trotting out independent of its actual relevance to the discussion.

> There's a fair amount of conflicting and complex psychology going on in that shopping decision beyond not just knowing that they should comparison shop.

Which would perhaps be an insightful counterargument if I had said something even approximately like “poor people who shop at dollar stores do it because they don't realize they should comparison shop”. Of the three reasons I gave for people shopping at dollar stores, only one relates to a failure to understand the price realities, and I never suggested that one was particularly common among the poor.

> Despite their limited ability, they ARE able to look at price tags in different stores and go "hey, wait a minute!"

Not really. Dollar stores have become so ubiquitous precisely because of their market dominance in areas without options–retail deserts, if you will. If you've really been dirt poor–and dirt poor outside the major cities and suburbs–you would know that driving 20-30 miles to the Wal-Mart two towns over, presuming they even have lower prices, can be cost prohibitive (especially when considering wear-and-tear and the risk of breaking down) when you're living day-to-day, even though in the long-term you end up paying more at the dollar store. Drive across the vast areas of rural and poor America and you'll see dollar stores in the most random and remotest of places; places that 10, 20, or 30 years ago had more options–you may even see their long shuttered remains somewhere nearby.

This is the classic dilemma the impoverished face, and have always faced–it takes money to make (or save) money. Yes, increases in prices at dollar stores will negatively impact alot of people. But when decrying the state of the nation you have to understand why that is and what it means. For example, before someone blames inflation, maybe they should look at profit margins. AFAICT, they've rose relatively sharply since COVID-19: https://www.macrotrends.net/stocks/charts/DG/dollar-general/. Indeed, the "narrowing" of Dollar Tree's earnings forecast mentioned in the article, from $5.40-$5.60 to $5.48-$5.58, is maybe better described as an upward adjustment. I suspect the price increase will help margins even further.

Kind of, but only because of the brief interregnum of the

1970s-1990s height of suburban shopping malls. Dollar stores are a revival of the general variety discount stores — “five-and-dime” or “dime stores” — that largely either fell to suburbanization and shopping malls or morphed out of the model into mega-retailers (Walton’s Five-and-Dime, for instance, is now known as WalMart) or did the latter but still ended up doing the fomer (e..g, Kmart); the new dollar stores were rising just as many of the earlier giants of the same model were taking their last breaths in the late 1990s and 2000s; at least one of the early dollar store chains (Dollar Zone) was a rebranding of a classic general variety discount store chain that had started as a literal dime store chain (McCrory’s).

The rise of dollar stores tracks pretty well with the decline of the malls that had marginalized the original variety discount stores. They weren’t so much a new phenomenon as something that went through about a generation of marginalization.

"Kyle Dishman can’t afford to shop at the local grocery store anymore. Instead he goes to Dollar General, where he can make $40 stretch into a week’s worth of groceries and the occasional can of motor oil for his Chrysler 300."

EDIT: Of course not all things cost $1, but it's certainly weighted in that direction. You don't go to a dollar store for nice things; you do it because it's the only option for you. A lot of the responses seem to want to debate how poor people are making choices, and I think that misses the point.

Dollar stores very often aren’t cheaper than other sources for similar products especially for grocery items (which they tend to have very limited selections of.)

People that shop for groceries at dollar stores do it because:

1. They shop for other things at dollar stores (either for price, or for reason #2, or because its the only place close by that carries the type of thing involved) and getting groceries there saves a trip,

2. Reputation for price without actual comparison,

3. Lack of actual grocery stores conveniently located,

Your own second article notes the relatively high prices (as well as quality issues) of dollar store groceries.

Despite their limited ability, they ARE able to look at price tags in different stores and go "hey, wait a minute!"

If you're dollar store level poor, it's expensive and stressful, and you're constantly weighing spending money now versus keeping what little remains for whatever awful thing is going to leave you destitute. There's a fair amount of conflicting and complex psychology going on in that shopping decision beyond not just knowing that they should comparison shop.

I’ve been dirt poor; I’ve never been in a situation where “dollar store as regular grocery source” made sense (though I’ve shopped in dollar stores, and occasionally when I did found deals on grocery items that were worthwhile), and I am very much aware of why that was never the case for me and why it is and was sometimes for other people.

Also, not all people who shop at dollar stores are dirt poor.

> It may be tough to believe, but y'know what'd surprise literally none of the poors if you told them? That they pay more money for less product at the dollar store than elsewhere.

Actually, it would probably suprise some of them. Believe it or not, poorly informed poor people do exist. The idea that they don't is as misguided as the idea that all poor people are poorly informed.

> Despite their limited ability, they ARE able to look at price tags in different stores

Not really, when reason #3 (“Lack of actual grocery stores conveniently located”) applies. Comparison shopping takes time and effort that is something of a luxury in the best of cases, but it also takes having alternatives in the first place.

> If you're dollar store level poor, it's expensive and stressful, and you're constantly weighing spending money now versus keeping what little remains for whatever awful thing is going to leave you destitute.

That's true, but it doesn't contradict anything I said. It's like you have a canned rant about poor people that you arr trotting out independent of its actual relevance to the discussion.

> There's a fair amount of conflicting and complex psychology going on in that shopping decision beyond not just knowing that they should comparison shop.

Which would perhaps be an insightful counterargument if I had said something even approximately like “poor people who shop at dollar stores do it because they don't realize they should comparison shop”. Of the three reasons I gave for people shopping at dollar stores, only one relates to a failure to understand the price realities, and I never suggested that one was particularly common among the poor.

> Despite their limited ability, they ARE able to look at price tags in different stores and go "hey, wait a minute!"

Not really. Dollar stores have become so ubiquitous precisely because of their market dominance in areas without options–retail deserts, if you will. If you've really been dirt poor–and dirt poor outside the major cities and suburbs–you would know that driving 20-30 miles to the Wal-Mart two towns over, presuming they even have lower prices, can be cost prohibitive (especially when considering wear-and-tear and the risk of breaking down) when you're living day-to-day, even though in the long-term you end up paying more at the dollar store. Drive across the vast areas of rural and poor America and you'll see dollar stores in the most random and remotest of places; places that 10, 20, or 30 years ago had more options–you may even see their long shuttered remains somewhere nearby.

This is the classic dilemma the impoverished face, and have always faced–it takes money to make (or save) money. Yes, increases in prices at dollar stores will negatively impact alot of people. But when decrying the state of the nation you have to understand why that is and what it means. For example, before someone blames inflation, maybe they should look at profit margins. AFAICT, they've rose relatively sharply since COVID-19: https://www.macrotrends.net/stocks/charts/DG/dollar-general/. Indeed, the "narrowing" of Dollar Tree's earnings forecast mentioned in the article, from $5.40-$5.60 to $5.48-$5.58, is maybe better described as an upward adjustment. I suspect the price increase will help margins even further.

Kind of, but only because of the brief interregnum of the

1970s-1990s height of suburban shopping malls. Dollar stores are a revival of the general variety discount stores — “five-and-dime” or “dime stores” — that largely either fell to suburbanization and shopping malls or morphed out of the model into mega-retailers (Walton’s Five-and-Dime, for instance, is now known as WalMart) or did the latter but still ended up doing the fomer (e..g, Kmart); the new dollar stores were rising just as many of the earlier giants of the same model were taking their last breaths in the late 1990s and 2000s; at least one of the early dollar store chains (Dollar Zone) was a rebranding of a classic general variety discount store chain that had started as a literal dime store chain (McCrory’s).

The rise of dollar stores tracks pretty well with the decline of the malls that had marginalized the original variety discount stores. They weren’t so much a new phenomenon as something that went through about a generation of marginalization.