How to audition at julliard

How to audition at julliard

March is audition month for dancers and musicians and callback month for actors, so the Journal has compiled some of the Admissions bloggers’ audition tips and cautionary tales.

How to audition at julliard

Know your material
Choose material that you gravitate toward and love— and know your text very well! Now’s a good time to make sure you’ve been preparing the correct works—you’re not going to want to realize that you’ve been playing the Bach E Major Sonata instead of the E-flat Major Sonata the day before (I may have learned this the hard way). The most essential aspect to auditioning is being so prepared that you could do the audition in your sleep. I try to spend weeks practicing my audition pieces over and over again until I know they are exactly where I want them, so even if something does go wrong, I will still have the ability and confidence to easily get back on course.

Get organized
Before you leave home or arrive at your audition, double- and triple-check that you have everything that you need with you, whether it’s music, rosin, pointe shoes, notes, snacks (very important), water, your phone charger, some form of identification (sometimes just a school ID won’t suffice, especially when flying), and a backup plan or two in case something goes wrong. And if you have to run to a CVS for ChapStick right before your audition, don’t sweat it!

How to audition at julliard

Don’t stress about your outfit, but…
As for your audition outfit, don’t stress too much about it—as if you don’t have enough to think about!—but choose something that looks professional, makes you feel confident, and will enable you to perform comfortably.

Arrive with time to spare
I once miscalculated the amount of time transportation would take for an audition. I arrived late and was overexcited and out of breath and all the chaos made my head fuzzy. And then at one point, the words completely slipped from my mind. Though I managed to fake it ’til I made it and was lucky enough to be accepted, I could have lost my chance completely. Moral of the story: always show up early.

How to audition at julliard

Be flexible
Make sure to allow yourself ample time to get there (early!), but don’t be surprised if auditions are running late. If you need to eat before performing, make sure you can do so as well. Treat this like any other performance—if you think it’s unwise to try something new, don’t.

How to audition at julliard

Do it for you
Audition for you, not your parents, your mentor, whoever—do it because you want it. Enjoy it! I learned more about acting during my three-day callback audition process than I did during my two years working as an actor before training at Juilliard.

How to audition at julliard

A word to the parents
Parents: we know this process is nerve-wracking for you too—go to Starbucks, go to the student cafeteria, ask questions of the current Juilliard students with nametags (they’re here to help)—and know that Juilliard has been running these auditions for many, many years and is still finding ways to make the audition process better every year. Be yourself In the interview, your best bet is to just be yourself. They don’t expect you to know everything; you are here to learn.

Be yourself
In the interview, your best bet is to just be yourself. They don’t expect you to know everything; you are here to learn. Be humble Accepting and recognizing that you still have a lot to learn shows a certain type of maturity that many people forget about: humility. Don’t be pretentious!

Enjoy the process
Once you’ve navigated the hurdles of wintertime travel, pre-audition hunger (or lack of appetite), and finding your way to the proper floor in the Juilliard building, everything will fall into place—you’re in your element. You know what you are doing. Your audition is meant to show your enthusiasm and dedication to your art—so even if everything doesn’t go perfectly, remember to enjoy the process!

Recalibrate
Think of the panel as an audience rather than as judges—I try to change my mindset from Will they like me? to I will offer whatever I can to touch their hearts and brighten their days.

How to audition at julliard

You’re supposed to be here
Early in my freshman year I told a faculty member that [non-Juilliard] people had said I was not supposed to be chosen for this school. The teacher responded, “You are supposed to be here. We don’t make mistakes.” Those words freed me to begin my true journey. Good luck! To all the auditioners out there, a very enthusiastic good luck! You’ll end up wherever you are meant to be, so above all, enjoy this exhilarating and memorable time.

How to audition at julliard

Welcome to Juilliard

For over a century, students have enrolled in The Juilliard School and graduated to fulfill their dreams in the performing arts. Dancers, actors, playwrights, classical and jazz musicians—all have come here to hone their craft and deepen their artistry.

A career in the arts is challenging, but the only way to make it happen is to risk: To risk taking that audition, creating that work of art, exposing who you are.

We invite you to take the step of applying to Juilliard, and we look forward to supporting you on your artistic journey.

Kathleen Tesar
Associate Dean for Enrollment Management

Getting Started

Whether you are just starting your research into Juilliard or are in the middle of submitting your application, we look forward to connecting with you. We encourage you to reach out to us, ask us questions, attend our events, and talk with your counselors and teachers. Wherever you decide to start, we’ll be here for you along the way.

Application Deadlines and Auditions

Applications for college-level degrees and programs at The Juilliard School and The Tianjin Juilliard School opened on September 1. If you are applying as an undergraduate or graduate student, please note your application deadline:

The Juilliard School (New York, USA)

  • BFA or MFA in Acting—apply by November 1
  • AD in Opera Studies—apply by November 1
  • AD in Playwriting—apply by November 15
  • BFA in Dance—apply by December 1
  • All other Music degrees—apply by December 1

The Tianjin Juilliard School (Tianjin, China)

  • MM in Chamber Music, Collaborative Piano, or Orchestral Studies – apply by the final deadline of January 15, 2021

NEW: Check your audition requirements, as the format has changed to accommodate pandemic restrictions

Juilliard is every young actors wet dream. It is the Alpha and the Omega. It is a wasp among flies, a spark among mist, a god among men. Someone from Juilliard saying “yes” to you, is someone confirming your life: Yes, you are great. Yes, you are talented. Yes, I see you are gifted.

If you don’t get a callback at Juilliard does it mean the opposite? That you are not talented? Not gifted? Not great?

Juilliard sees thousands of students, and like most of the best Theatre schools in the nation, they are looking for a certain type. They may not know what that type is, so don’t try to fit in, or be like him/her, or try to act like the person that moves you the most. Just be you. No one can be you, as well as you can. Not getting a callback means you’re normal and probably very talented. Honestly, having the courage to stand up and audition at Juilliard qualifies you as bold, and strident.

There are a number of articles in and around the web, on what it’s like to audition at Juilliard—I’ll let you in on what is like for me….

Very friendly. From the person at the door, the monitors in the hall, the woman who went around and let us know approximately what will be happening. Every one was sweet and friendly. Big smiles, big handshakes. Really nice people. Except this one kid. He was awkward. I think he was a fourth year student—it’s not easy to remember as I was pretty focused and didn’t talk to anyone, but he sat down in the holding area and chatted up some of the younger aspiring actresses and asked when they were going back home, and his energy was creepy, he seemed pompous, and arrogant. These women were like seventeen years old and he was asking what they were doing that night. And not in a way of being friendly. It was really slimy, and a little upsetting. I wanted to tap the kid on the shoulder and say you’re being inappropriate, but I figured it wasn’t my business, and anyway these girls have their parents waiting for them downstairs.

The holding room is horrible. It is Auschwitz, except everyone is nervous-chatty with the blah, blah, blah, about nothing. It made me ill. It made me hate actors. I kept going for walks and using different warm up rooms. They have them upstairs. I used them about three times. They say you can only use them once, but there were so many of us, the Juilliard students had no idea I continued to use the rooms. Also, and I don’t think I recommend doing this: I snuck into a room that was empty and just did some vocal warm ups and physical warm ups which was very helpful in giving me an idea of how my voice would sound in the room. The third time I used the room wasn’t for warm ups is was just to get out of Sobibor the holding pen. It really made me sick. So I sat in the warm up room and breathed. Just me and the grand piano.

I get called into ‘on deck,’ position. I’m waiting in the hall. I’m sitting down on a bench very focused. The person who is in the room comes out and the monitor says to him “give me a second.” The monitor enters the room, where the audition is taking place, comes back out a moment later and either says “they’d like to see you again,” or, “great, thanks so much.”

I felt very calm when I entered the room and saw three people sitting behind a desk. One of them was named Richard (I think), he was the one who spoke to the auditionees (in an assembly sort of way), when we first arrived. (An orientation, of sorts, prior to being led through a vocal group exercise. I thought the whole speech was a little unnecessary, but I appreciated it. I think it’s important to mention I’m thirty-five years old and no longer have that cultish devotion to people who speak in truths about art. I simply register it; it warms my insides, and I move on.) I remember feeling powerful. Not in a ‘fuck you’ get ready for me,’ but in a ‘you are all masters of your craft, and I take this craft very seriously.” I really wanted to share my monologues with these guys. I performed my Shakespeare and my contemporary (I had four more, and a song, in reserve). They said thank you. They called me back in the room. They asked why I chose my particular Shakespeare monologue. I told them. They said drop your character, just be you, and let me see the reason you chose this monologue. I did that, and felt very connected. I remember thinking, fuck, why didn’t my coach tell me that? They said thank you and I left the room. They called me back into the room and asked me to sit in the chair. I did. They asked me to perform my contemporary monologue, but sitting in the chair. They asked me who I was speaking to and I told them, and they told me to take myself out of the circumstances of that play and just simply sit in the chair, drop my character, my accent, my movements, and go for what I want. I did. I felt chills all around my neck and eyes as I performed the monologue with their adjustments (it’s important to note that during my rehearsing of these monologues, I had imagined what they would say to me after performing. I imagined what adjustments they would give me and how I would incorporate them. What I am saying is, I was surprised only by the feelings their adjustments elicited, not by the actual adjustments). They sent me out of the room. They called me back in the room and asked me to sing. But sing to myself, as if I was the only person in the room. I did. They said ‘thank you,’ and the moment they said it—I knew I was getting a call back.

The Office of Admissions has several policies that apply broadly to all applicants to our programs, in addition to the more specific application requirements.

Additional Links

Auditions & Selection

Selection Policy

The Juilliard School seeks students whose talent and commitment to excellence promise future achievement in their chosen areas of major study.

The Committee on Admissions selects students on the basis of their performance at competitive auditions held at The Juilliard School and in selected cities outside of New York. All auditions are evaluated by members of the faculty.

Applicants who are admitted must begin their studies in the fall semester. New students normally may not enroll at mid-year. Applicants who have earned a post-secondary degree are eligible to apply only for a higher degree, not to duplicate the same level.

Age Limits

The School does not set a minimum or maximum age limit (with the exception of Dance and the Artist Diploma in Opera Studies; please see those sections below for more information). In general, the faculty and the Committee on Admissions will give preference to students in the formative stages of their performance careers who will benefit most from the type of training available at Juilliard.

Dance

All applicants must be a minimum of 16 years of age upon matriculation to Juilliard. The school does not set a maximum age limit for BFA applicants to the Dance Division. In general, however, the faculty and the Committee on Admissions will give preference to students in the formative stages of their performance careers who will benefit most from the type of training available at Juilliard. If you feel you have the training necessary for the Dance program, you are welcome to apply.

Artist Diploma in Opera Studies

Applicants must be at least 21 years old.

Equal Opportunity and Anti-Discrimination

The Juilliard School is committed to a policy of equal treatment and opportunity in every aspect of its relations with its faculty, staff, students and other member of the Juilliard community, and does not discriminate on the basis of actual or perceived race, color, religion, creed, age, sex, national origin, alienage, ancestry, citizenship, sexual orientation or preference, gender identity, physical or mental disability, medical condition, predisposing genetic characteristics, marital status, partnership status, or any other basis prohibited by applicable local, state, or federal law. This non-discrimination policy covers, but is not limited to, recruitment, hiring, training, benefits, rates of pay and other forms of compensation, as well as student admission, access, and treatment in School programs and activities.

Affirmative Action

The Juilliard School admits students of any race, color, national, or ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the School. It does not discriminate on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, religion, age, disability, race, color, national, or ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and other School-administered programs.

Admissions decisions are not related to financial aid applications or decisions.

Late Applications

Dance

In general, The Juilliard School does not accept late applications for Dance majors. To be assured of consideration for admission, applicants must meet the stated application deadline.

After all on-time Dance applicants have been scheduled for auditions, if there are still audition spaces available, the Office of Admissions will consider accepting late applications.

The availability of audition spaces cannot be assessed until early January, and it is not likely that spaces will be available.

It is the prospective applicant’s responsibility to check this website for updated information on the possibility of submitting a late application.

The Office of Admissions anticipates that an update regarding the acceptance of late applications will be posted here in early January.

In the event that late applications will be accepted, all application requirements (including submission of a prescreening recording for applicants who reside outside of the U.S. and Canada) will apply.

Additionally, if late applications are accepted, applicants should be aware that the choice of audition dates will be extremely limited. Therefore, it is in the applicant’s best interest to meet the application deadline.

Questions should be directed to [email protected] .

Acting

In general, The Juilliard School does not accept late applications. To be assured of consideration for admission, applicants must meet the application deadline.

After all on-time applicants have been scheduled for auditions, if there are still audition spaces available the Office of Admissions will consider accepting late applications.

The availability of audition spaces cannot be assessed until early January, and it is not likely that spaces will be available.

It is the prospective applicant’s responsibility to check this website for updated information on the possibility of submitting a late application.

The Office of Admissions anticipates that an update regarding the acceptance of late applications will be posted here in early January.

In the event that late applications will be accepted, all application requirements (including submission of a prescreening recording for applicants who reside outside of the U.S. and Canada) will apply.

Additionally, if late applications are accepted, applicants should be aware that the choice of audition dates will be extremely limited. Therefore, it is in the applicant’s best interest to meet the application deadline.

Questions may be directed to [email protected] .

Music

In general, The Juilliard School does not accept late applications or late prescreening materials for Music majors. To be assured of consideration for admission, applicants must meet the stated application deadline.

Following the December 1 deadline for Music applications, the Office of Admissions will assess whether late applications will be accepted, by major (for example, violin, composition, jazz, etc.).

In general, the determination and posting of majors open for late applications is done within 48 hours of the December 1 deadline. The list of majors will be posted here, with a short timeframe for submission (generally four to five days).

It is the prospective applicant’s responsibility to check this website for updated information on the possibility of submitting a late application.

In the event that late applications will be accepted, all application requirements (including submission of a prescreening recording) will apply.

Additionally, if late applications are accepted, applicants should be aware that the choice of audition dates will be extremely limited; applicants will not have the opportunity to request preferred audition dates, but will be scheduled in whichever appropriate audition slots remain. (“Appropriate” slots are those in which applicants would be auditioning among candidates applying to the same major and degree level.) Therefore, it is in the applicant’s best interest to meet the application deadline.

Questions should be directed to [email protected] .

Last December, I submitted my application to Juilliard. Before I can audition, I have to pass Juilliard’s prescreen. Per the website, two recommendation letters, a resume, essay, video introduction, and forty five minutes of memorized music are required.

Most applicants prepare their prescreening videos at a professional recording studio. One of mine was shot at a friend’s house on a smartphone, propped up against a couch.

Juilliard receives approximately four hundred and fifty applications for piano performance, out of which about a hundred are invited to audition. I was one of them.

I knew I had better start practicing. I would be playing the same program as I did for my prescreening, but without the possibility of pressing delete if something went wrong.

Even worse, I won’t get to play most of my audition program.

As I walk onto the brightly lit stage and look at the rows of chairs from which my musical potential will be judged, I know that the next four years of my life will be determined by seventeen minutes of music.

If I only knew which seventeen minutes!

I choose what I start with: a relatively unknown work by the composer Grazyna Bacewicz. The piece accentuates what makes me the pianist I am, showcasing my intensity of emotion and musical color palate. The piano has a delicate, rich sound which I capitalize on, bringing out the fury and pain Bacewicz conveys through this piece. They stop me and ask for my Beethoven Tempest Sonata. The piano’s sound is now detrimental; the bass notes are to quiet. I try to compensate by making my right hand quieter, but it’s not working! I lose focus, known to science as the “flow state”, and am no longer fully committed.

Of the 100 applicants invited to audition, Juilliard will pick close to 10. Mediocre playing won’t cut it, so I anticipate a rejection.

A couple weeks after my unfortunate performance, I receive an email from Juilliard informing me that a status update was posted to my applicant portal. I open the page and am startled by falling blue confetti.

I got into Juilliard. I was one of the ten.

But here’s the thing. Two days later I learned that Juilliard rejected me. My family isn’t dirt poor, but it certainly isn’t rich. Even with a barrage of loans, Juilliard financial aid award failed to meet my need.

By over thirty thousand dollars a year.

This is the real college scandal . Not that people who pay enough go to the Juilliard’s, Harvards and MIT’s of modern society but rather that those who do get in, can’t go because they can’t pay enough.

The problem starts well before college. It starts before first grade. I like most people who have a sliver of a chance of getting into Juilliard start playing piano around age four or five. Playing is only part of the equation-the most important factor of all is the teaching. The best teachers (and if you want to go to a top conservatory, you need the best) charge between a hundred and two hundred and fifty dollars per hour. You need lessons at least twice a week. If we take a relatively low rate of a hundred and fifty an hour, that’s over fourteen thousand a year, not counting costs of travel to and from your lesson, as well as that of competitions, concerts, and auditions, which you need to build up your resume.

If my mom didn’t teach piano, I wouldn’t be a pianist. My parents can’t pay thousands of dollars for piano lessons, and neither can other lower income families. Classical music has a reputation for being elitist. It doesn’t help that education systems in the United States and elsewhere have long been pushing out music as irrelevant and not necessary and neither do modern trends toward distraction and shorter term fulfillment.

But the reality is, from a financial perspective, classical music really is.

And it’s a shame.

Classical music is soothing and relaxing. It possesses a depth of emotion and expression that popular music simply lacks. It is deeply rooted in western culture. Its potential to have a positive effect on modern society is immense. Just read what it did for me:

This is the go-to guide for getting into The Juilliard School. We suggest you read until the end. Not only will we layout the exact GPA and test scores you should aim for when applying to The Juilliard School, but we’ll also offer creative ways to help your application stand out from the pack. We breakdown The Juilliard School statistics better than any article out there and show you how these have changed over time. Also, make sure to check out The Juilliard School on CampusReel to see what it’s really like here. If you’re interesting in transferring to The Juilliard School, the read our transfer guide. You can also use the below calculator to help determine your likelihood of acceptance at The Juilliard School

What GPA do you need to get into The Juilliard School?

The Juilliard School’s average GPA is 3.15. The Juilliard School does require GPA. The Juilliard School is currently selective. However, be aware that oftentimes schools in this GPA range are increasing their selectivity in hope of increasing “prestige”. We can’t read the minds of The Juilliard School application readers, but they likely want to increase the average GPA from 3.15 to 3.31 this year – to play it safe, we recommend striving for the 3.31 GPA.

*BEFORE CONTINUING PLEASE NOTE: GPA and “prestige” DO NOT mean a college is right for you. The Juilliard School may seem amazing on paper, but you may hate it. That’s why 700,000 students transfer colleges every year – they end up going to the wrong school. It’s crucial to watch the videos on CampusReel and make sure you can envision yourself on The Juilliard School’s campus. These The Juilliard School admission statistics do not sufficiently tell you what a college or university is like.

What is The Juilliard School’s acceptance rate?

Last year The Juilliard School’s acceptance rate was 6.43. However, check out how the acceptance rate has changed over time.

2016 2017 2018
Acceptance Rate N/A N/A 6.43 %

As you can see, The Juilliard School is a little easier to get into than last year.

Acceptance rate alone does not indicate your likelihood for getting into The Juilliard School – it’s a very high level understanding of the true competition. Use the acceptance rate as a general guide for curating a list of 10-15 schools that fall into different ranges of competitiveness. Then, use the below data to get a deeper understanding of how your application will compare to the rest of the pool.

Does The Juilliard School Require Test Scores?

The Juilliard School requires that you either take the SAT or ACT. See the table below for how The Juilliard School’s accepted students have performed on both tests. You may be wondering how many test scores should you submit. Generally, don’t freak out about taking the test too often. Industry consensus is that you can submit up to 6 tests as a reasonable limit.

The Juilliard School SAT Requirements

The Juilliard School’s average SAT score is 0 – this is the sum of the math and reading portions of the SAT (the 1600 scale). Check out the below table for a deeper look into how students performed – it’s also very interesting to look at the average test score over time. The trend over time helps give insight into whether The Juilliard School is getting more or less competitive.

25th Percentile 75th Percentile Average
Math 0 0 0
Reading 0 0 0
2019 Total 0 0 0
2018 Total
2017 Total

The Juilliard School’s average SAT score is 0. To be a competitive applicant for The Juilliard School your SAT score should come close to the average. If you’re closer to the 0, you’re likely going to have a tougher time getting accepted. To consider The Juilliard School a “target” school (one that you are likely to get into) you should aim for a score of 0.

The Juilliard School ACT Requirements

The Juilliard School’s average ACT score is 0. To be a competitive applicant for The Juilliard School your ACT score should come close to the average. If you’re closer to the 0, you’re likely going to have a tougher time getting accepted. To consider The Juilliard School a “target” school (one that you have a good chance of getting into) you should aim for a score of 0.

25th Percentile 75th Percentile Average
Math 0 0 0
Reading 0 0 0
Writing
2019 Total 0 0 0
2018 Total
2017 Total

How hard is it to get into The Juilliard School?

As you can see from the data above, The Juilliard School is exceptionally difficult to get into. Not only should you be aiming for a 3.15 but also SAT scores around 0. Getting into The Juilliard School is no easy feat and you will need to set yourself apart with more than just numbers and data. Read on to learn how.

The Juilliard School Requirements

Now you know where you need to be for getting into The Juilliard School from a grade and test score perspective. Let’s quickly outline what else you’ll need to provide for your application to get reviewed, and then we’ll move onto the most important section: differentiating your app.

Recommendations Status
School Rank Neither required nor recommended
GPA Neither required nor recommended
School Record Required

Follow these steps to maximize your chances of getting into The Juilliard School. Everything you read above will help prepare you for what you need to achieve to have a shot at The Juilliard School, but these steps will take you even further in applying that knowledge and differentiating your application.

Create Your Account

All applicants to The Juilliard School in New York and The Tianjin Juilliard School in China must create an admissions account before beginning an application for a specific program. To get started, select whether you are a returning or first-time user and follow the instructions given. Please note: The email address you provide will be the primary method of communication used throughout the application process.

Program Requirements

Detailed program requirements for The Juilliard School in New York can be found by using our Application Requirements Wizard. Simply follow the prompts to arrive at the specific requirements for your program.

Detailed program requirements for The Tianjin Juilliard School in China can be found by visiting our website. Please be sure to review the requirements specific to your major.

Start Your Application

Once you have created and logged into your account, you may begin a new application by clicking on the “Start a New Application” link located near the bottom of your screen.

Applicants to The Juilliard School (New York)

Select “Application for Fall 2021” if you are applying to:

  • College-level programs with The Juilliard School (BFA, BM, Barnard-Columbia-Juilliard Exchange, MFA, MM, GD, DMA, AD) (Applications for Fall 2021 are now closed. The application for Fall 2022 will open September 1, 2021)

Select “Summer 2021 Programs” if you are applying to:

  • String Quartet Seminar (Application will open Spring 2021)
  • Summer Dance Intensive (Applications are now closed)
  • Percussion Seminar
  • Percussion Master Class Series (Cancelled for Summer 2021)
  • Starling-DeLay Symposium on Violin Studies (Currently accepting applications)
  • Juilliard Summer Winds (Currently accepting applications)

Select “Preparatory Education Applications Fall 2021” if you are applying to:

  • Juilliard Pre-College in New York (Application opens October 2020)
  • Music Advancement Program (MAP) (Application opens January 2021)

Applicants to The Tianjin Juilliard School (China)

Select “Tianjin Juilliard Applications Fall 2021” if you are applying to:

  • Tianjin Juilliard Pre-College program (Application opens October 15, 2020)
  • Tianjin Graduate Studies (Application deadline has passed. Contact Admissions Office at [email protected] for permission to still apply).

Status Page

If you have already submitted an application, you can check your application status page for more information and to submit additional materials.

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How to audition at julliard

Composition alumna Cynthia Lee Wong’s illustrations are now for sale in the Juilliard Store.

(Photo by Cynthia Lee Wong )

Since March is auditions month for dancers and musicians, The Journal has condensed some of the Admissions bloggers’ audition tips and photos to show you, prospective students, a slice of Juilliard life. We’d like to join the bloggers—and all of Juilliard—in welcoming you and wishing you the very best of luck! (Photos by Riley O’FLynn, Philip Stoddard, and Gregory Costanza)

How to audition at julliard1. Get enough sleep. It’s pretty much the best way to relax your body and prepare for the increased stress and demand for concentration during audition season. And check out a bulletproof method for destressing by Juilliard faculty member and alum Noa Kageyama.

2. Arrive early. You can check out a video of the audition space on the Juilliard Facebook page, but you’ll still want to get here early enough on the big day to familiarize yourself with the space. Plus you should allow for street, subway, and sidewalk traffic, especially if there’s inclement weather.

3. Pack snacks. It’s always a good idea to have a water bottle, and even though you might not feel hungry, your body will definitely appreciate a few healthy snacks while you’re waiting. Try coconut water, apples, nuts—and glucose tablets can do real magic, too.

4. Bring distractions. Juilliard works hard to try to keep the audition process smooth and enjoyable, but it will be a long day, so bring a book or a score or headphones—anything that will help you while away the time.How to audition at julliard

5. Warm up. Musicians should secure a practice room, and if you’ll be needing a piano accompanist, contact him or her early so you’re both fully prepared—the accompanists play dozens of auditions in a very short period of time; a longer heads-up will save both of you a lot of headaches. Dancers, prior to the ballet portion of the audition, you’ll be able to warm up in Room 321.

6. Mingle. Go on a Juilliard tour, meet current students, meet your fellow auditioners. It will help pass the time—and you never know, you might be spending a lot of time with these people.

7. Embrace your nerves and channel that energy into your audition. Remember that you love playing music/dancing/acting and that’s why you’re here.

8. Everyone is on your side. Know that the jury members are rooting for you and are here to help you succeed. Smile at them and then pretend they’re not even there.

9. Be flexible. We try to stay on schedule and keep everything running smoothly, but it’s good to come with a flexible attitude and patience.

10. Have fun. You got this! We’re so proud of you and we don’t even know you!

How to audition at julliardAnother place to read about Juilliard life and students is the new international student blog. Here’s a little bit of what third-year South African actor Hannes Otto had to say in the first one.

I knew I wanted to be an actor when I saw The Sound of Music when I was 6 years old and fell in love with the character of Liesl. After two days of my being “lovesick” and refusing to eat, my grandmother, trying to help, called up the producer of the play, who she happened to know, and organized for me to meet the actress who played Liesl for tea, hoping that this would cure my condition. When finally meeting Liesl, I was so overwhelmed by her presence and beauty that I wet my pants. That’s when I knew—I want to have what she has: the ability to change people’s lives (and make them wet their pants).