How to age beef

join the community

How to age beef

Ripe beef is more delicate and aromatic than beef that has not undergone the curing process. Without aging, meat wouldn’t be good for most people. Some have even described beef that has not been aged as a metal. Overall, the meat is seasoned commercially with strictly controlled and monitored temperature and humidity levels. The aging process is defined and regulated by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Although beef can be cured at home, it is not recommended.

Ripe beef takes about 11 days to develop the beef flavor that most people are used to; however, in some cases the aging process can take 10 to 45 days. The longer the meat ages, the better the meat will taste for those who eat it. Also, as mentioned above, seasoned beef has increased tenderness, as the muscle and collagen in the meat begins to change under the action of certain enzymes. Maximum tenderness can be achieved about 11 days after the cow is slaughtered.

Interestingly, cured beef has a shorter shelf life. Ground beef made from ripe meat won’t last long in a home refrigerator due to the increase in bacteria from the aging process. Therefore, aged meat should be eaten immediately after purchase or frozen.

The meat can be dry or wet cured. Dried meat is usually refrigerated for several weeks. It is used in gourmet restaurants and gourmet butchers, and is preferred by some people because the humidity level is lowered to give the meat a more “meaty” taste and more tenderness. Some people prefer the rich taste of dry aging; however, others believe that the meat has a musty taste.

Alternatively, stewed aged meat is cured in a vacuum-sealed bag and sealed. It is a faster ripening method and maintains a high level of moisture in the meat. Since the weight of the meat is preserved, it is cheaper than dry aging. Wet aging was not available to consumers until the 1960s. Therefore, it is not yet to be considered a traditional aging process; in fact, many people find the taste of stewed aged meat to be bland at best.

The USDA has strict laws regarding the aging process. They also require consumers to know the aging process of each piece of meat. Dzięki temu konsumenci mogą łatwo sprawdzić, jak długo ich wołowina była leżakowana i w jakim procesie – na mokro czy na sucho.

Dee is a Colorado-based freelance writer. She has a B. A. in English Literature, as well as a law degree. Dee is particularly interested in topics related to medicine, legal affairs and DIY, which she specializes in.

Dee is a Colorado-based freelance writer. She has a B. A. in English Literature, as well as a law degree. Dee is particularly interested in topics related to medicine, legal affairs and DIY, which she specializes in.

You may also like

Recommended

Readers love too

Related articles

  • What is seasoned beef?
  • What is a Tafel Spitz?
  • What is Burgundy beef?
  • What are the types of ground beef?
  • What is Wellington Beef?
  • What does the United States Department of Agriculture do?
  • What is Lomo Saltado?

Comments for discussion

@ Babalaas – Grass-fed beef is much healthier than grain-fed beef. A recent study by Cal State-Chico looked at thirty years of research on grass-fed beef versus grain-fed beef. For an overview of the research, see last year’s New York Times article.

Grass-fed cattle have less cholesterol, fewer bad fats, more good fatty acids, and far more antioxidants than grain-fed cattle. The increase in omega-3 fatty acids is the greatest benefit, besides reducing cholesterol-rich fats in cattle. Research has shown that Omega-3 fatty acids promote cardiovascular health and lower the level of bad cholesterol. Elevated CLA in grass-fed cattle has anticancer properties and reduces the risk of certain cancers, such as colon cancer. CLA has also been shown to support healthy weight.

Consider all of these things, that doesn’t mean grass-fed beef is as healthy as fish, but nearly as healthy as skinless chicken breast. Moderation is key, but you should be able to enjoy grass-fed beef more than grain-fed beef. Baba yesterday

Anyone know if cured beef and grass-fed steak are healthier than corn-fed steak? I love burgers and steaks, but my bad cholesterol is slightly above average. I know I need to limit the amount of meat I eat, but will I lower the cholesterol in my diet by eating high-quality grass-fed meat? Anfibia54 January 31, 2011

Personally I prefer the taste of cured beef, even if it’s not always affordable. The stew aged beef flavor, so common in cheaper restaurants and the average grocery store, leaves behind a steak or ground beef that doesn’t stand out in taste.

My local grocery store occasionally sells dry-cured, grass-fed, organic New Zealand beef. Il sapore della carne è più complesso e i pezzi cuociono meglio. When it comes to selling, I usually stock up on my freezer. If you use a vacuum bag, the meat remains as fresh and tasty as it was the day it was purchased.

How to age beef

Principal. Choice. To choose. USDA approved. foodie. Supercalifragile exploration…. Okay, so maybe we did the latter, but each of the other words and phrases are used regularly by butchers and beef suppliers, both online and in the local market, to describe the various selections and cuts available. We’ve gone into detail regarding some of these mysterious terms, but there’s one we’ve yet to delve into. It would be dry-aged steak or beef.

While at Steak University we tend to consider this more of a preparation than a type, there’s no denying that dry-aged is a label that’s here to stay in the premium meat market, and rightly so. We may be biased, but it’s our opinion that there’s few things that can top a fine meal of dry-aged, premium, USDA prime beef. Now that we’ve piqued your culinary interest sit back, we’ve got all the what’s, why’s, how’s and even a couple of scientific facts, behind the gourmet delicacy that is dry-aged steak.

What is a cured steak: the science behind the hype

Before we get into the details of cooking a cured steak at home, first a few definitions. Dry seasoning of steaks involves storing the uncovered meat in a refrigerated environment for a long time. While this seems awfully simplistic, there’s a number of highly complicated process that take place in the meat as a result of this treatment.

To begin with, by letting the steak open and dry, the liquids in the meat begin to evaporate, condensing both the remaining moisture and the desired flavor. But wait, you can tell. Doesn’t the tenderness of a steak depend on the moisture content and therefore, shouldn’t a dry-aged steak be tougher? While the logic may seem reasonable at first glance, dry aging causes many other enzymatic and bacterial processes in the meat, breaking down the protein and naturally softening the steak. What we’re left with is a cut of steak that, as a result of the dry-aging process, is more flavorful and tender at the same time.

How to dry a steak in a dry age at home?

Now that we’ve hyped this most excellent method for preparing steak, we need to get down to the nitty gritty of just how to dry age steak. Large specialty butchers, luxury steaks, and online gourmet steakhouses typically have dedicated curing rooms that control factors such as temperature, humidity, and air circulation.

These dedicated extreme setups won’t be practical for most home chefs looking to impress at their next meat-based dinner. The good news is that, while handy, high tech equipment isn’t required and you can dry age meat in your own home refrigerator or spare mini-fridge with a little bit of prep work.

You’ll need to start with a larger, multi-steak cut of meat, preferably with a large amount of fat coating still remaining. You need the size and fat to protect the meat and leave you some substance to work with when you trim off the desiccated or wasted portions of your dry-aged meat when it’s done prepping.

Simply place the roast or similar piece of beef in the refrigerator, uncovered, for a minimum of 7 days and up to two weeks. Remove the meat from the refrigerator when ready to eat, cut the inedible and hardened parts (this is where the fat cap comes in to save the day and the meat under it) and cook according to your preferred method. Some people recommend wrapping dried meat in cheese, while others create elaborate methods of circulating the air using small fans placed in the refrigerator. While we wouldn’t discourage good old fashioned experimentation, the truth is you simply don’t need to complicate things to get the benefits of dry aged steak at home.

Dry Age Tips

  • The ideal temperature for dry-aged beef is 34–38 ° F
  • Using a vacuum bag will protect the meat from contamination with other food products
  • Air flow is important to ensure proper dry maturation of the meat
  • For the optimal flavor of beef that has been cured for 28-40 days

More seasoned steak options

At this point, you might say that dry curing a steak at home may be pretty good, but it still sounds a little too strenuous for my taste. In that case, you’re in luck. At Chicago Steak Company we dry age our premium USDA Prime steaks in a special dry aging room, trimming and then individually wrapping steaks after they’ve been aged to tasty, flavorful perfection. Our steaks are then delivered directly to your home, carefully seasoned and ready to eat. Whether you purchase your dry aged steak online or do it yourself at home, you can’t go wrong with giving your high quality, premium meat a chance to mature and age prior to delving in.

Published byJake EllerMay 28, 2019

How to age beef

Meat can generally be seasoned dry or wet. The two techniques produce very different results on the same cuts of meat. It’s hard to say one tastes better than the other — they’re simply different. Dry aging tends to produce a very aggressive and pungent flavor, while wet aging produces a more delicate and versatile flavor. We steak lovers can enjoy an intense, deep-flavored dry cured piece, but some people have certainly pointed out that this seasoned flavor is too strong or spicy. For this crowd, wet aging could be the answer.

In contrast to the centuries-old dry aging technique, wet aging is a relatively recent invention. During dry curing, the meat is left in the open air. Due to this oxygen exposure, some bacterial growth is promoted and possible. This creates an intense and aromatic flavor that is reminiscent of aged cheese. Unfortunately, the dry aging process is extremely resource-intensive and not very realistic for a home cook. Wet refining, on the other hand, is perfectly available as it requires very little dedicated equipment.

With a few tips and tricks, you can try getting wet in your home.

The first and perhaps most important step is to determine when the meat was originally killed and packaged. Based on the packing date, you can determine how long your window needs to be wet aged. If you skip this step, chances are you’ll end up with a rotten piece of meat. Typically, the packing date will be printed on the crate where the meat arrived. Ask your butcher — chances are, he’ll be happy to provide that information. Or, if you’re feeling particularly hungry, feel free to buy the whole case!

As you probably know, the fillets are vacuum packed in bags. It’s important to double check the bag for leaks before going any further with this process. It’s possible (and easy) during transport for the seal to be punctured slightly, so make sure the meat is 100% air-tight.

One of the great things about wet-aging is how simple the process is — once you’ve got these aforementioned ducks in a row, the hard part is done! Put the pork loin in the fridge and wait! We recommend anywhere from 30-60 days. As long as the fillet is well sealed, mold and rot do not build up.

Once your aging has passed, open it up! You will notice a distinct smell, but it shouldn’t smell rotten or spoiled. Trust us — you’ll know if it is. Rinse the fillet in cold water, then remove any discolored or unwanted pieces. From there, you’re good to go! It can be butchered and cooked like any other piece you can buy, aged or otherwise.

As you can see, wet aging is within the reach of a home cook. It just takes a little knowledge and a good piece of beef to get started!

DO YOU WANT A 10% DISCOUNT ON YOUR ORDER?

Ready for the barbecue? Check out our line of barbecue accessories! If you sign up for our email newsletter, you will also receive a 10% discount on your first order!

How to age beef

You may have seen dried cured meat for sale in upscale restaurants and grocery stores. It is an expensive delicacy, much in demand for its rich flavor profile and delicate texture. The dry aging process breaks down part of the muscle tissue, making the final product tastier and more delicate. In the world of gastronomy, this method is considered better than wet curing, which can saturate the meat with unwanted additives.

Because cured meat is more popular than cured meat or not, and because the process involves cutting a larger piece of meat into what will eventually become an edible end product, these tasty products cost quite well. Fortunately, you can dry aging at home at almost no extra cost! If you are a meat lover, you should understand the process. It might be easier than you think.

Step 1: Choose high quality meat for dry seasoning

If you find it difficult to dry-ripen your meat, you want it to be good enough to be worth an investment. The highest quality beef in the United States is USDA “prime” certified.

Other types of meat, such as pork, poultry, game, and even fish, can also age. One limiting factor is size – since you’ll eventually be cutting pieces of meat, you’ll want to start with a fairly large piece. A little bird or a fish might not be worth it, but a large ribbed roast is a great starting ingredient. If you try to dry-age a single steak, you will be disappointed with how much it shrinks and how much you have to cut.

How to age beef

Step 2: Cut the fat

Don’t chop the meat into steaks just yet, but cut the outer fat as much as possible. Slice slowly and carefully to remove only the fat, not the meat.

Step 3: Install the refrigerator

It’s a good idea to choose a dedicated refrigerator for this task, such as a small to medium sized refrigerator you have in your garage or basement. You don’t want your meat to age in your main refrigerator as it may pick up flavors from other foods and this will affect the flavor. Attempting to dry meat in a standard refrigerator can also unbalance the humidity level.

Put a small electric fan inside to ensure constant airflow inside the refrigerator. Pull the cable from the front door along the bottom insert, keeping it as flat as possible.

The refrigerator temperature should be between 29 and 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

Step 4: Prepare the tray

Place the grill on the large, flat baking sheet. The tray will collect the slurry that falls through the rack. The bottom of the rack must move away from the tray to facilitate this process. Otherwise, your meat will end up in its own hoods and that will spoil the drying.

Step 5: prepare the meat

Place the meat in the center of the grill. Make sure it is firmly in place and that the rack and tray fully support it.

How to age beef

Step 6: start aging

Put the meat, the grater and the pan in the refrigerator. That’s right, and you started drying your meat. You will be celebrating in a few weeks.

How long should I keep the meat dry in the refrigerator? It all depends on the desired result. The meat will be noticeably more tender after two to four weeks. You can try a small piece after the first few weeks to see how the flavor develops. After about four to six weeks, the meat will develop a distinct seasoning flavor.

If you really want the flavor profile to develop, wait six to eight weeks. You can nibble every now and then for the taste test, but remember that every time you open the door it will affect the humidity level of the refrigerator. Try to avoid too many taste tests or you will affect the final result. Remove the meat when it has the rich flavor you are looking for.

Other types of meat age faster. Fish, turkeys and ducks can dry out in three to four days, chicken can dry out for a week or two (brine first for best results), pork and game need to dry for three to four weeks. Some kitchens cook particularly delicate meats, such as duck, before dry seasoning to reduce the risk of bacteria. Another approach, especially useful with fish, is to remove and clean the meat daily to discourage the growth of bacteria.

Step 7: cut

When the meat is ready to cook, drain it and remove any moldy or hard parts. A little mold is very normal and relatively harmless. Just remove – the rest of the meat is safe to eat. When you trim the mold, you can also remove any remaining fat on the meat.

Step 8: Cut the portions

Cut the meat into slices of the thickness and shape you prefer: ready!

How to age beef

Only the best restaurants in the United States serve flavor-optimized steaks through special aging processes. There are several aging processes used to age dry aged meat, sometimes referred to as “Old World Style”, used by more parent restaurants. Cured beef is usually not sold in supermarkets due to the time and cost involved in the curing process. The meat curing process dates back to around the 1950s, when butchers discovered that curing the meat produced a more tender and flavorful steak. The flavor of the meat matures as it ages to give it a richer flavor, which intensifies as the meat matures until it reaches the optimal ripening period. Only high quality cuts of beef are used in the dry curing process. Beef chunks need to be cut to the correct thickness and marbling to handle the rigorous aging process and maintain sufficient body weight for a thick, juicy steak.

Dry storage temperature

Once a piece of beef has been selected as suitable for dry aging, the beef is hung in a refrigerated room where the temperature is maintained between 32 and 39 degrees Fahrenheit or between 0 and 4 degrees Celsius and the humidity is controlled to keep it fresh. The preferred humidity setting ranges from 50 to 85% based on individual preferences, but is usually closer to 60%. Il flusso d’aria consigliato è 0,5 – 2 m/s o 1,6 – 6,6 piedi/s. to ensure optimal weight loss and trimming during the aging process. Once you learn how to properly age a steak, you will know how much you need to control the temperature, humidity, and airflow.

The process must allow the meat to mature naturally to enhance the flavor and texture of the meat. During the dry aging process, normal chemical processes in the body break down muscles and connective tissue, which helps crush the meat. The temperature is regulated to allow for dehydration which causes the meat to shrink. Dehydration allows the outside of the meat to dry out, while the inside loses water much more slowly, resulting in increased tenderness. Weight loss should be 10-15%. To achieve optimal weight loss, the whole process takes about 20-40 days.

The resulting cured steaks are popular in upscale restaurants by avid steak lovers and even the occasional steak tasters for the hearty, tender and juicy steaks served every time. Whenever a restaurant advertises a cured steak, customers automatically know that it comes only from high quality beef that has undergone rigorous processing to ensure a delicious steak.

At the Chicago Steak Company, we hand-select only the best steaks for our customers. Dry Aging Steaks are always packed with marbles to deliver the delicious flavor our customers have come to expect. The rich taste guaranteed by our seasoned Ribeye, Strip Steak, Filet Mignon, T-Bone and Porterhouse steaks will satisfy even the most discerning steak connoisseur.

How to age beef

How to age beef

Aging meat isn’t really optional when it comes to wild game. For the lean, hard cuts that hunters are familiar with, creating a high-quality end product is critical.

There are two types of aging, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. Dry aging is considered the traditional form of aging. For those who aren’t set up with the right equipment to hang a critter, wet aging is a great alternative. This process is really simple, but when it comes to venison, there isn’t much info available on the wet aging process. So I decided to test the different maturation times of venison loin and compare if the difference in tenderness was worth the time invested.

Before I get into the details, let’s be clear on what aging is and why we want to do it. Animals are athletes, which means their muscles are highly developed. Enzymes in the body continually accumulate and break down proteins, and the degradation process continues even after death. Rigor Mortis takes over shortly after killing him, so calpain, the main enzyme responsible for this action, begins to break down muscle fibers. Hence, aging is sometimes referred to as the decomposition process, but remember that it is not the same as spoiling meat.

Wet aging is relatively new. Basically all you need to do is vacuum pack the meat and leave it in the refrigerator for 7-28 days. The enzymes still work to break down the tissues and the bag seals the air to prevent contamination. This is a much simpler process that can be done with frozen meat. In fact, many times I take meat from the freezer a week before I plan to cook and allow it to age if I didn’t do it prior to freezing.

This technique is best for lean cuts that don’t have a protective fat barrier as it eliminates water loss. The downside to wet aging is that the meat does not concentrate and develop the depth of flavor the way dry aging can because there’s no water loss or mold growth. However, it remains in a pouch of its own juices and blood, adding what most consider “deer”.

How to age beef

For this I let the unpacked meat rest in the refrigerator on a wire rack placed in the pan for 24 hours before sealing it. This gives the meat time to dry and excess blood drips onto the tray before the bag is closed. For example, if you shoot a deer or antelope that’s been eating a bunch of sage, I would recommend this. After every 7 days of curing, pour the blood, dry it and close it again, repeating until the end of maturation.

In my research, I came across several standard time frames; 7 to 14 days appeared to be the typical duration. That didn’t seem quite long enough for venison. To test the different aging times, I took the 6-inch portion of the strip and let it dry in the refrigerator (set at 35 degrees) for 24 hours to drain the blood. Then I vacuum the pork loin and leave it in the refrigerator for another 7 days. After a week, I opened the pouch, drained the blood that had been washed off, cut a 2-inch fillet, labeled it, and froze it. I vacuum sealed the remains of the fillet and left it to mature for another week. I cut the 2-inch fillet back, scored it, and froze it. Finally, I closed the last 2 inch fillet and left it for another week. When I finished I had to test three 2 inch fillets: ages 7, 14 and 21 days.

When I was ready to taste, I defrosted the other two steaks and seasoned them with some salt, pepper, garlic and thyme. I decided to cook to the dashboard frying them in a cast iron skillet on the grill. I tried to cook each of them to exactly the same consistency as medium rare. You can see by the pictures that there isn’t much of a difference in appearance between the aged filets. In fact, there wasn’t a huge difference in flavor either; none of the pieces had a bad taste. I didn’t find a big difference in tenderness between the 7-day and 14-day filets, but the 21-day age was melt-in-your mouth tender.

So what have I learned? I’d recommend a 14-day minimum age for venison, but will occasionally do 21 or 28 days. While this has been tested using a backstrap, I think it will have a dramatic effect on other primary cuts as well. My only regret with the test was that I didn’t have more loin to wet age and experiment with. It was fucking good.

  • "Precedente
  • 1
  • Następny "

Butcher on the grill
Administrator

Post by Butcher on the grillon Jun 8, 2005 16:10:52 GMT -5

The meat can be seasoned to enhance its flavor and tenderness. As meat ages, enzymes are released from the meat that help soften the hard connective tissue. Ripe beef is not to be confused with old beef, which refers to expired beef.

Purchase whole roast beef, entrecote, or sirloin and make sure the kriovac is still tight. Ask the meat department for the “packing date” on the box it arrived in. This is very important! You don’t want to know the date on the price sticker or the date they received it. you want the packing date to be on the box it arrived in. If the date cannot be determined, find another place to get the meat, or wait for the next order and ask to save the packaging. Knowing the packaging date, you can put the meat in an additional refrigerator at about 35-36 ° and let it rest until it is six weeks in all. Not six weeks from purchase, but six weeks from packaging. Check every few days to make sure the package is still intact and that there are no air or fluid leaks.

If you notice a fluid leak or the cryovac starts to swell, it is a leak and immediately slice the meat and freeze or use it.

At the end or “your” curing time, place the meat in the sink and open it, being careful not to cut the meat with the knife. Most likely, the fragrance will greet your nose. This is normal because the enzymes I mentioned earlier react with the bacteria inside the cryovac. Rinse the meat with COLD water and dry it. All, most or part of the smell will disappear. Even for a short time, 30 minutes, air drying in the refrigerator should help dissipate the odor. You may or may not still have a slight odor, but don’t worry. Dried meat has a musty smell that is also difficult to get rid of.

Cut the steaks and enjoy your meal! Remember. You can ONLY ripen the whole base pieces, NOT the individual steaks. Attempting to age a steak will end up with an OLD STEAK.

How to age beef

How to age beef

Aging meat isn’t really optional when it comes to wild game. For the lean, hard cuts that hunters are familiar with, creating a high-quality end product is critical.

There are two types of aging, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. Dry aging is considered the traditional form of aging. For those who aren’t set up with the right equipment to hang a critter, wet aging is a great alternative. This process is really simple, but when it comes to venison, there isn’t much info available on the wet aging process. So I decided to test the different maturation times of venison loin and compare if the difference in tenderness was worth the time invested.

Before I get into the details, let’s be clear on what aging is and why we want to do it. Animals are athletes, which means their muscles are highly developed. Enzymes in the body continually accumulate and break down proteins, and the degradation process continues even after death. Rigor Mortis takes over shortly after killing him, so calpain, the main enzyme responsible for this action, begins to break down muscle fibers. Hence, aging is sometimes referred to as the decomposition process, but remember that it is not the same as spoiling meat.

Wet aging is relatively new. Basically all you need to do is vacuum pack the meat and leave it in the refrigerator for 7-28 days. The enzymes still work to break down the tissues and the bag seals the air to prevent contamination. This is a much simpler process that can be done with frozen meat. In fact, many times I take meat from the freezer a week before I plan to cook and allow it to age if I didn’t do it prior to freezing.

This technique is best for lean cuts that don’t have a protective fat barrier as it eliminates water loss. The downside to wet aging is that the meat does not concentrate and develop the depth of flavor the way dry aging can because there’s no water loss or mold growth. However, it remains in a pouch of its own juices and blood, adding what most consider “deer”.

How to age beef

For this I let the unpacked meat rest in the refrigerator on a wire rack placed in the pan for 24 hours before sealing it. This gives the meat time to dry and excess blood drips onto the tray before the bag is closed. For example, if you shoot a deer or antelope that’s been eating a bunch of sage, I would recommend this. After every 7 days of curing, pour the blood, dry it and close it again, repeating until the end of maturation.

In my research, I came across several standard time frames; 7 to 14 days appeared to be the typical duration. That didn’t seem quite long enough for venison. To test the different aging times, I took the 6-inch portion of the strip and let it dry in the refrigerator (set at 35 degrees) for 24 hours to drain the blood. Then I vacuum the pork loin and leave it in the refrigerator for another 7 days. After a week, I opened the pouch, drained the blood that had been washed off, cut a 2-inch fillet, labeled it, and froze it. I vacuum sealed the remains of the fillet and left it to mature for another week. I cut the 2-inch fillet back, scored it, and froze it. Finally, I closed the last 2 inch fillet and left it for another week. When I finished I had to test three 2 inch fillets: ages 7, 14 and 21 days.

When I was ready to taste, I defrosted the other two steaks and seasoned them with some salt, pepper, garlic and thyme. I decided to cook to the dashboard frying them in a cast iron skillet on the grill. I tried to cook each of them to exactly the same consistency as medium rare. You can see by the pictures that there isn’t much of a difference in appearance between the aged filets. In fact, there wasn’t a huge difference in flavor either; none of the pieces had a bad taste. I didn’t find a big difference in tenderness between the 7-day and 14-day filets, but the 21-day age was melt-in-your mouth tender.

So what have I learned? I’d recommend a 14-day minimum age for venison, but will occasionally do 21 or 28 days. While this has been tested using a backstrap, I think it will have a dramatic effect on other primary cuts as well. My only regret with the test was that I didn’t have more loin to wet age and experiment with. It was fucking good.

Published
Categorized as IT