How to act at an audition

Today’s world is definitely one of opportunity, especially when it comes to art and entertainment. The world of high profile acting was never as open to those who don’t come from a high profile background or study at expensive New York or Los Angeles acting schools. Getting your acting career on the roll is probably as much about training as it is about grabbing the right opportunities at the right moments.

Open casting calls are the most useful tools for those who are feeling capable that they can make an immediate impact upon their acting careers, but aren’t well-enough known to get invited to usual castings. They might also prove to be an opportunity to score your name into onto a big production even with an almost insignificant role – it’s still a thing to boast over and usually gets you good pay when compared to the amount of work you have to do. And even if you don’t manage to grab the jobs, you’ll at least get acquainted with directors and get to know what they appreciate – making you have better chances of success with every casting you attend.

How to act at an audition

Example of an open casting call poster, looking for young boys to star in a family movie.

Firstly, to make sure we’re on the same terms – open casting calls are the types of casting which can be attended by anyone. That’s right, it doesn’t matter if you’re a physics teacher from a town in Michigan or a ski instructor from Philadelphia; everyone can give it a try and hope for the best. This seems like more competition at a first glance, but think of it this way: the overall quality of casting attendants will be lower, and this means that you have more chances of sticking out from the crowd if you have the talent.

Finding such auditions used to be quite a niche process back in the day, but the rise of the online streamlined to just a couple of clicks. Sites like ActorsAccess or Backstage display a wide array of such auditions, ranging from indie movies to multimillion dollar budget blockbusters all over the country – be it Dallas, San Francisco, Boston or other locations (though in some cases the more important casting calls are hidden behind a pay wall – meaning you need special types of membership on those sites).

But before noting yourself the time and date of the audition, be sure to take a look at the role’s breakdown, which normally should be posted in the announcement. This is basically a summary of the available roles within the picture, and the most important thing is to at least resemble one of them by physical aspect – you can’t really hope to get a female role as a male, now. There might also be slight details posted about the character, giving you a hint towards the mindset you should approach the audition with.

If you’re really looking to see how professional open casting calls are held, then you should try attending a Disney one. It’s not really as complicated as it sounds; Disney actually holds several large open casting calls at multiple points throughout the year, all over the country. If there’s some kind of opportunity in your area, you’ll surely get wind of it; they don’t downplay it as they want as many people to show up for them as possible. It doesn’t hurt checking their site periodically though.

One of the most famous recent examples happened throughout 2013 and 2014, when a season of massive casting calls involving tens of thousands were held for the very anticipated next Star Wars movie, with two mostly unknown actors ending up being cast in what appears to be as key roles. This was also manner in which the most beloved original cast for the 70’s series was also found.

So, how do you go about a Disney open casting call to maximize your chances of being noticed? Well, if you don’t really manage to fit in, you can’t do much to convince them of your real talent. However, there are certain aspects which you could be sure to do to stick out of the crowd. The most essential thing is to make sure that you get there about a quarter of an hour before the time your audition was scheduled for; being late might not only cost you the chance of proving yourself, but might even give you a bad reputation for it.

Also, don’t forget to bring an actor resume and the best headshots you can afford. You’ll hand them over to Disney employees, who are required to keep them and, who knows, might even call you up for other auditions that fit your profile. The audition itself is done in an enclosed area, so you’re pretty much going to be there on your own. Don’t worry though, Disney employees present there will make it so that the whole thing will be less intimidating than it appears.

Now the specifics of what you’ll be required to do depends on the nature of the role; but generally, Disney requires auditioned actors to come prepared with a comedic monologue lasting no more than a minute. Timing there is essential, as you’ll be stopped if you pass that minute mark; making a complete monologue will leave a better impression than a cut-off one.

How to act at an audition

Example of a color version of a casting call flyer.

Another type of popular open auditions are those for entertainment shows. Channels like MTV, CBS or NBC hold them nationwide on a regular basis; even Nickeloden holds them for teens, kids and babies. In these open casting calls, it’ll probably be less about your acting skills and more about your overall charisma; particularly if you’re auditioning for reality shows.

Shows like The Amazing Race or Big Brother do massive cast periods in a multitude of locations and they require less an actor and more a believable, interesting and fun-to-watch human being. Other shows have other requirements, depending on their target: America’s Got Talent is self-explanatory, The X-Factor will look for competent singers and so forth.

This might not really be what you had in mind when you picked acting as the main focus of your career, but the truth is this type of shows grant two things which are extremely appreciated in any form of entertainment today: image and exposure. They will fit great onto your resume are also good places to be observed; you’d be surprised on how major production companies also keep tabs on the TV entertainment industry for their next star. They also pay decently, and might even end up with a big prize if you manage to win their respective competitions.

How to act at an audition

There’s a ton of ways to stand out at an audition: acting like a diva, wearing a crazy costume, or being just plain crazy. Stand out you will, but for all the wrong reasons. Here are some positive ways to be more memorable at your next audition.

Being prepared in every possible way is sure to make you stand out as a true professional. i.e.: Be warmed up, physically and vocally, have your headshot and résumé (plus extra copies), carry your sides, know the character, understand the project and the tone of the script, and be aware of who’s in the room. As the saying goes, “Success happens when preparedness meets opportunity.”

Being on time is super important. Perhaps you won’t stand out for being on time, but you’ll definitely stand out for being late- and not in a good way. Being on time shows that you are a professional and you value both your time and the casting director’s time.

Having proper audition technique is a must. Slate accordingly and don’t do any ‘green’ actor ticks that make you look like a newbie or a hack. No last minute tongue twisters in front of casting or strange turns into character. Say your name, take a beat, and begin.

No matter what the character, dress in a way that shows a hint of them. If you’re auditioning for a Queen don’t wear a ballgown, but simply something that shows you have class and poise. Most importantly, always dress with respect for yourself.

Go in and do the best you can do and be happy with that. Don’t seek validation, it’s needy and casts doubt over your entire performance.

Be kind to the other actors in the waiting room, to the monitor, to the receptionist, to the security guard- to everyone. First of all, you never know who’s watching, and secondly, you should be kind regardless because it generates positive energy, which is good for everyone.

Be pliable. Even if you disagree with the direction given just go with the flow.

When you go in front of casting, try to connect with them on a human level instead of putting them on a pedestal. Ask them how they are doing and try to strike up a quick convo on something you can both connect on. Be aware of time and your surroundings; don’t be overly chatty if you sense they are rushed.

This is one of the most important things you can do. A hundred other actors just read the same copy as you did with basically the same instincts. Find a moment in the script where you can add something surprising and unexpected, while remaining true to the scene. This is your chance to let your creativity shine.

If you’ve been doing the same tired monologue over and over again- mix it up. Try something that scares you. Taking a risk is always noticeable.

If you connected with the script or the character let the casting director know. It never hurts to mention that you really loved the story, or that you found the character eerily similar to you.

Find a way to allow what makes you unique, shine through the copy.

If an opportunity to mix up the material arises- take it. If they aren’t specific that your monologue/scene comes from a play, take one from a lesser known movie or television series. As long as it fits the needs of what they may be looking for and it’s okay to do so- it’s a great chance to do something they’ve probably never seen before instead of the same tired Heidi Chronicle monologue.

Try doing a scene or a monologue written for the opposite sex. It adds a fun twist and when done correctly it can really turn heads.

It’s impressive when an actor knows how to properly pronounce the strange word in the script, or understands the odd historic reference. It also makes you look super smart- which never hurts.

If you have a genuine question about the script or character, ask it. But don’t waste time by asking arbitrary questions just to stand in front of casting for a few moments longer.

Whether it’s commercial copy or a comedic scene look for a button. Find it, then end strong with it. When actors don’t hit the button it’s equivalent to never receiving the sweet satisfaction of hearing the other shoe drop.

The most important thing above all else is to make a choice, a strong choice, and then stick with it. Don’t change your mind in the middle of the scene- for better or for worse, ride that choice to the end.

How to act at an audition

Emmanuel Faure/The Image Bank/Getty Images

  • M.A. in Literature, California State University – Northridge
  • B.A. in Creative Writing, California State University – Northridge

A queasy feeling settles into your stomach. You are surrounded by a group of gossiping men and women who sip cafe mochas while complimenting each other’s headshots. Suddenly, the casting director calls your number. “What monologue will you be reading for us today?” she asks.

“Oh, sorry,” you reply. “I didn’t know I was supposed to bring one.” Her annoyed expression tells you everything. You won’t be getting a callback.

This scenario can be easily avoided by following these simple audition tips.

Read the Audition Notice Carefully

Actors should arrive at auditions fully prepared, not just ready to perform, but also to present any requested material. Examine the audition notice. Should you prepare one monologue? Two? Make certain you match the material to the play. For example, if you are auditioning for Oedipus Rex, prepare a scene from Greek drama, not The Odd Couple.

Finally, based on the audition notice, make certain you are trying out for an appropriate part. If the casting director is looking for a tall, bald man in his 60s, don’t show up hoping that they will change the script for your short, frizzy-haired, thirty-year-old self. Follow whatever guidelines are offered to ensure that you arrive at the audition as organized as possible.

Be Professional

Show the casting director how reliable you are by showing up at least fifteen minutes before the audition. Be courteous, but don’t be too talkative. Don’t pester crew members or fellow actors with idle conversation. Spend your time privately readying yourself.

Most casting directors expect you to bring a headshot and resume. This might not hold true for community theatre productions. However, if you are committed to a career in theater, you may want to bring these along just to make a favorable impression.

In general, think of an audition as a job interview. Avoid inappropriate behavior, whether its chewing gum, using profanity, behaving too shyly or brashly, or making long-winded speeches as to why you are perfect for the role.

Dress Appropriately

Usually, it is best to wear “business casual” attire. You want to exhibit charm and professionalism, but you don’t want to look like a stock-broker or a banker. Remember, many new actors make the mistake of wearing costumes to audition. Perhaps they say to themselves: “Hey, I’ve got a great pirate outfit from last Halloween! I’ll wear that!” Sadly, this is bound to cause casting directors to chuckle under their breath. They might be amused, but they will definitely not take the actor seriously.

If you are auditioning for a dancing part in a musical, wear dance attire. It should not be anything flashy or expensive. Any choreographer worth her salt will focus on your dancing ability, not your sequins.

Perfect Your Monologue

If you are asked to bring a monologue, make certain that you have rehearsed it completely. Do not just know the lines, know the character you are becoming. Let the directors see a striking difference between the person that just said hello to them and the character that is now coming to life on the stage.

At the same time, be flexible with the audition material. They might have you read the lines over, asking you to take on a different personality. Sure, you may do great when you perform the monologue with tears in your eyes, but be prepared if they ask you to do the same lines in a calm, icy voice or a whimsical British dialect. If given the chance, show them that you can interpret the role in many different ways.

Get to Know the Play

Many auditions involve reading “sides.” Sides are small, hand-picked portions of a script. Sometimes they are a brief monologue. Sometimes they are short scenes involving two or more characters. Most of the time, you won’t know exactly what scene you’ll be reading. In that case, you’ll want to familiarize yourself with the play in general.

If you are auditioning for a popular play feel free to buy a copy of the script online or at your local bookstore. Better yet, visit your local library. Watching a film version of the play might help as well. Don’t simply mimic the movie actor’s performance, though; casting directors want to see what you can create, not what you can imitate.

Practice Cold Reading

If the play is rather obscure or brand new, it may be difficult to purchase a copy. In that case, you’ll want to polish up your cold reading skills. Cold reading is the act of performing lines as you read them for the very first time. It can be a nerve-wracking experience, but with practice, most actors can become quite adept at it.

The best way to become a fluent cold reader is to read aloud as often as you can. When you cold read during your audition, do not worry if you stumble over a word or two. The important thing to remember is to stay in character. Create chemistry between you and your fellow actor. Make the casting director, and anyone else watching, believe that you are thinking and feeling the words on the page.

Don’t Apologize

After an audition, an actor becomes his own worst critic. Often times, hopeful thespians are tempted to explain themselves to the directors. They provide excuses or even apologies in hopes of gaining sympathy. Avoid this as much as you can. Thank the casting director and leave the stage knowing that if you are right for the part, they will contact you. If not, know that you did your best. And remember: there are many other wonderful roles out there just waiting to be filled.

How to act at an audition

There’s a ton of ways to stand out at an audition: acting like a diva, wearing a crazy costume, or being just plain crazy. Stand out you will, but for all the wrong reasons. Here are some positive ways to be more memorable at your next audition.

Being prepared in every possible way is sure to make you stand out as a true professional. i.e.: Be warmed up, physically and vocally, have your headshot and résumé (plus extra copies), carry your sides, know the character, understand the project and the tone of the script, and be aware of who’s in the room. As the saying goes, “Success happens when preparedness meets opportunity.”

Being on time is super important. Perhaps you won’t stand out for being on time, but you’ll definitely stand out for being late- and not in a good way. Being on time shows that you are a professional and you value both your time and the casting director’s time.

Having proper audition technique is a must. Slate accordingly and don’t do any ‘green’ actor ticks that make you look like a newbie or a hack. No last minute tongue twisters in front of casting or strange turns into character. Say your name, take a beat, and begin.

No matter what the character, dress in a way that shows a hint of them. If you’re auditioning for a Queen don’t wear a ballgown, but simply something that shows you have class and poise. Most importantly, always dress with respect for yourself.

Go in and do the best you can do and be happy with that. Don’t seek validation, it’s needy and casts doubt over your entire performance.

Be kind to the other actors in the waiting room, to the monitor, to the receptionist, to the security guard- to everyone. First of all, you never know who’s watching, and secondly, you should be kind regardless because it generates positive energy, which is good for everyone.

Be pliable. Even if you disagree with the direction given just go with the flow.

When you go in front of casting, try to connect with them on a human level instead of putting them on a pedestal. Ask them how they are doing and try to strike up a quick convo on something you can both connect on. Be aware of time and your surroundings; don’t be overly chatty if you sense they are rushed.

This is one of the most important things you can do. A hundred other actors just read the same copy as you did with basically the same instincts. Find a moment in the script where you can add something surprising and unexpected, while remaining true to the scene. This is your chance to let your creativity shine.

If you’ve been doing the same tired monologue over and over again- mix it up. Try something that scares you. Taking a risk is always noticeable.

If you connected with the script or the character let the casting director know. It never hurts to mention that you really loved the story, or that you found the character eerily similar to you.

Find a way to allow what makes you unique, shine through the copy.

If an opportunity to mix up the material arises- take it. If they aren’t specific that your monologue/scene comes from a play, take one from a lesser known movie or television series. As long as it fits the needs of what they may be looking for and it’s okay to do so- it’s a great chance to do something they’ve probably never seen before instead of the same tired Heidi Chronicle monologue.

Try doing a scene or a monologue written for the opposite sex. It adds a fun twist and when done correctly it can really turn heads.

It’s impressive when an actor knows how to properly pronounce the strange word in the script, or understands the odd historic reference. It also makes you look super smart- which never hurts.

If you have a genuine question about the script or character, ask it. But don’t waste time by asking arbitrary questions just to stand in front of casting for a few moments longer.

Whether it’s commercial copy or a comedic scene look for a button. Find it, then end strong with it. When actors don’t hit the button it’s equivalent to never receiving the sweet satisfaction of hearing the other shoe drop.

The most important thing above all else is to make a choice, a strong choice, and then stick with it. Don’t change your mind in the middle of the scene- for better or for worse, ride that choice to the end.

The Casting room: the scariest few minutes of an actors job.

With all castings I think actors always think of the worst case scenarios before entering the room. do I know my lines, what if I don’t look right, I’m too old etc.

For a start if your being called in to be seen you are what there looking for and want you to be great so they can cast you in the role and stop the hunt.

These top casting directors are not looking for the “perfect” performance they want to see HOW you say the words and your own interpretation of the role. most cases its to meet you in person and get a feel for your personality and looks on camera.

From personal experience I’ve seen people hired by being a nice human being, working hard and being a good actor. other cases I have seen people cast by looks alone or people they know.

Don’t expect anything at auditions, each casting will be different. some people could be in there for ages while being director while others are in and out before you even finished filling the forms in. this is not a bad thing, some people interpret the role well and others need a little guidance. The casting director wants to send your tape with your best performance. if you are good this makes the casting director look good.

You don’t normally get asked many questions, its walk in say your lines with possible direction and back out. If you get recalled this will feel more pressurized as more people will be there to watch you, possibly the director or producer. you will be asked to stay longer and play many different scenarios to see how well you take direction. you may or may not have another actor to work with, if the other role has been filled they will be doing “chemistry” reads, this is just to see how well the actors act together.

just forget about everyone else in the room and focus on you, do this and you’ll be fine!

How to act at an auditionWondering how to audition for a movie and make it to the big screen? Here, we’ll share six important tips for success.

Many major movies are filmed in big cities such as Los Angeles and New York. Whatever big city you are closest to, you should start by looking up the local film office. For example, if you search online for “Massachusetts State Film Office,” you should see a website like this.

Every state also has its own film office, which will have all the information you need about what is being filmed in that state, local auditions, etc. Keep reading for more helpful tips to nail your next audition.

How to Audition for a Movie: 6 Steps

1) Find Your Role

This is a necessary step for those interested in how to audition for movies.

For most films, it may sound superficial but looks really are everything. You will need to try to assess which characters you could play on film. For example, do you look like a high school student? Could you portray a daughter, or a sister? Or could you play the dreamy boyfriend?

Think of all the different character possibilities you could portray, and start looking for the most appropriate auditions.

2) Find Smaller Productions

If you’re diving into film for the first time, you don’t necessarily have to shoot for the major, commercial films.

You might not realize it, but whatever city you are in there are many independent and student films being created and filmed all the time! This is a great way to start out, and see what it’s like being on a film set.

If you’re a college student, you should also get involved in your school’s film department. Many students will need to make films for their majors. These won’t pay well, but it’s a great way to start learning about film and how to act on film.

Also, low-budget independent films and short films are a great way to get a speaking part!

3) Find Background Work

If you’re wondering how to audition for a movie, you’ve probably already done some acting training or taken acting lessons. If so, don’t be be afraid to go for the big budget films! But films are being made every day, and they usually need tons of extras.

Extra or background work is fun – you will learn so much about film, get a decent paycheck, and perhaps even be featured on film. The part may be small, but you never know – depending on your look and how you act on the film set, you could get bumped up into a featured or speaking role.

If you want a speaking role, or a main role in a film, doing extra work is essential before you can hit these goals. Extra work will help you become comfortable on camera, get used to the terminology, and learn how a movie is made.

You may or may not need to audition for extra work. I encourage you to research online for local casting directors – try searching for something like “Background Casting Directors” and a list should come up near your city.

You then can register to have your headshot and resume on file, and if they have a role open for your character type they will get in touch with you.

4) Keep an Eye Out for Audition Notices

Many audition notices are posted online on sites like Playbill, Backstage, Actors Access, and Casting Networks. Some of these trade websites require a monthly fee to subscribe, and some of them even allow you to “audition” by submitting your materials online.

Your materials should include a headshot and acting resume, and perhaps a reel of video footage. With the industry changing so much, it’s easy to get headshots taken and get some film footage with YouTube, Vimeo, Vine, and so on.

5) Expect Competition at Auditions

At a film audition, you should expect a lot of other people auditioning for the same role as you. Sometimes the writer or director may be present in the room. Other times it will be interns from a local film office who will film a quick take and send it to LA for more consideration.

No matter who is in the room, you should always remain professional and courteous at all times. A film audition will usually consist of you reading lines from the actual movie, say with another actor, who they are also considering for a role.

Sometimes you will have seen the script before, and other times they’ll give it to you on the spot. The casting team has many people to see, and are usually tired from auditions. If you’re wondering how to audition for movies in the best way: be prepared and don’t ask them many questions.

6) Work Your Way Up to the Union

Working in film and TV, you will eventually need to be part of the union, which is called SAG/AFTRA (Screen Actors Guild, and American Federation of TV and Recording Arts).

The union will make sure you are paid fairly, have health insurance, and are not working under unethical circumstances. Many of the main roles and speaking parts in major films are cast with actors represented in the union, and usually only actors in the union can audition for that role.

If you are not in that union, you are then considered non-union. Non-union actors are paid less, so you’re probably wondering, how can I get in that union? The answer is: it will take some time, work, and dedication!

You will need to do extra work for a few years before getting into the union. If you audition for a film as a non-union actor, and are offered a union role right away, the production will grant you the opportunity to join the union. No one can just join, you have to earn your way up!

Also by doing extra work, sometimes you can earn “waivers,” which are given when the role is meant for a union person, but they cannot possibly find a union person to fulfill it. Once you earn three waivers (three days on set), you become eligible to join.

However, there is a pricey initiation fee to join, and once you join you can’t do work that is not covered by a SAG/AFTRA contract (meaning you can’t do non-union work).

Knowing these tips for how to audition for a movie is your first step, but keep in mind that working your way through the film industry will take time. With hard work, patience, and persistence it will all pay off, and you will have fun doing so!

How to act at an auditionLiz T. teaches online singing, acting, and music lessons. She is a graduate of the Berklee College of Music with a B.M in Vocal performance and currently performs/teaches all styles of music, including Musical Theater, Classical, Jazz, Rock, Pop, R&B, and Country. Learn more about Liz here!

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This article was co-authored by Lesly Kahn, MFA. Lesly Kahn is an acting teacher and coach based in Los Angeles, California. She is the founder and owner of Lesly Kahn & Company, Actor Training, which focuses on preparing actors for employment in film, television and theatre. With well over 30 years of experience, Ms. Kahn has coached hundreds of actors who have become household names. She also ran the BFA Program in Acting at Marymount Manhattan College, and worked in television as well as New York and regional theatre. Lesly holds a BFA from New York University and an MFA from The Yale School of Drama.

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Actors of all ages, looks, shapes and sizes are necessary to help brands and companies sell and promote their products. Doing television commercials can be lucrative for actors and open doors to bigger roles. You do not have to be a professional actor or model to audition for a TV commercial, but having a little experience in front of the camera is a plus. Start by preparing properly for the audition. Then, give the casting director energy, excitement, and variety so you book the job.

Auditions for kids and teens are plentiful. But you have to know where to look. (And who to talk to. ) So let’s get started!

What do stars like Natalie Portman, Drew Barrymore, and Leonardo DiCaprio have in common? They were all children when they got their start. And they all had an agent.

Agents and Managers

For adult actors, representation is not as important. It’s better to focus on finding auditions and mastering their technique. Getting an agent happens when they’re working consistently. It happens when they’re ready.

But when finding auditions for kids, they must have an agent first. Why?

Ever been to an open casting call for the Disney Channel? It’s a zoo. Everyone and their mother is there. Literally.

(And speaking of Disney, read this article about how to become a Disney Channel actress.)

Agents and managers can save you from that stressful experience by getting you a private audience with the powers that be.

Here’s how to find an agent/manager for kids:

1. Do your research. Search for acting studios in major cities near you. Call and ask if they teach a class for kids (or teens). If they say yes, it almost always means that they’re looking for local talent to sign.

2. Take a class. The studio might offer kids’ courses from 6 to 9 weeks long. (This is another good signal that the studio is poaching kids to sign contracts.)

3. Snoop around. Ask questions, seek answers. Someone connected to that studio is an agent or manager. Make sure they know who you are.

4. Be talented. They won’t sign just anyone. From a class of 30 kids, maybe 1 will be approached about working with an agent. Make sure it’s you.

The strategy is simple: Find the right community and become an indispensable part of it. This is how success works.

If it doesn’t work the first time, try again with a different class. Or even a different acting studio. Keep your eyes and ears open. It’s easy to become a child actor, you just have to be in the right place at the right time.

Be Careful

Some agents and managers can get you into private acting auditions for teens and kids. Absolutely. But others are just liars and charlatans. Here’s how to tell the difference:

They ask for money. If an agent or manager tells you there’s a fee for signing his contract, run the other way. Why?

Because agents and managers get a percentage of what you earn as an actor. If they ask for money up front, it means they might take it and disappear.

And the same goes for organizations like ProScout, which promise to set you up with agents and managers.

Hide your checkbook. Period.

Acting Training for Kids & Teens

Kids have a wonderful capacity for imagination. Much better than us adults. And imagination is one of the key components of acting talent.

In my experience, acting classes stifle a kid’s ability to imagine. Too much structure and not enough creativity.

“But you just told me to sign up for an acting class!”

True. But stick to classes like voiceover or commercial technique. Anything that doesn’t directly involve acting methods. Plenty of time for that later. Make auditions for kids your first priority.

Stage Mothers

The musical fable Gypsy is about Mama Rose pushing her daughters to be vaudeville performers. But along the way, she exposes them to adult situations, and destitution.

Mama Rose is the ultimate stage mother: Agressive, domineering, and downright pushy. So what happens to her? She ends up alone, desperate, and abandoned by her family.

A simple word of caution for parents: Make sure you’re not confusing your kids’ dreams with your own. Don’t push them.

The Bottom Line

Auditions for kids are out there. But it’s a wild world, and you should only do business with people you can trust. If you follow this advice, you’ll be a real working (child) actor!

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Post a Casting Call

Are you a producer or director? Seeking talent for your next project? Post your casting notice on Ace Your Audition.

Simply send an email to [email protected] with the subject New Casting Call and include the following information.

  • Basics: Title of project, type of project (film, TV, theater, commercial, voiceover, print), casting agency, production company, a short description or synopsis, the genre, union or non-union, etc.
  • Dates: Audition dates, shooting dates, etc.
  • Locations: Audition location, shooting location, etc.
  • Compensation: What is the pay? Any other perks?
  • Character Breakdown: Including age, gender, race, personality traits, and any other relevant info.
  • Image(s): Whether it’s your production company’s logo, your headshot, or promotional material for the project, including an image is always a good idea.
  • Call to Action: How should actors submit? Is there an open call? What should they prepare?

If approved, you may expect your casting notice to be displayed within 72 hours. You will receive email notification with a link.

Feel free to post your casting call on our Facebook page as well.